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Treating Skin Cancer-Stage I is Much Different than Stage IV

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Skin Cancer can be Aggressive, Complicated and Expensive to Treat. Learn About Integrative Therapies to Enhance The Efficacy of Conventional Chemotherapy

Diagnoses of both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers are increasing annually at five times as fast as other cancer therapies in the ’07-’11 time period studied. Just as important is that the conventional therapy for these cancers is also increasing…faster than the increases of other conventional chemotherapies.

Click the image below to learn more about skin cancer-

Skin Cancer Mind Map

The impact on you the cancer patient? According to the article linked below, insurance and medicare pays, on average, about 80-85% which means that the patient has to pay for the other 15%.

The prices for conventional  melanoma cancer therapies can total hundreds of thousands of dollars. The patient can expect to live for 18-24 months depending on your stage, age, etc.

The solution is to combine integrative evidence-based, non-conventional therapies. Therapies that can add both quality and quantity of life to the cancer patient suffering from advance melanoma.

To learn more about therapies for early stage or advanced stage skin cancers, scroll down the page, post a question or a comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Thanks

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Costs for Skin Cancer Increasing Faster Than for Other Cancers

“The costs associated with skin cancer are “substantial,” and in fact have increased five times as fast as treatments for other cancers from 2002 to 2011, say the authors of a new study…

During the period 2007-2011, private health insurance paid for 43.4% of all skin cancer treatment costs, and Medicare paid for 41.1%. For cancers at other sites, private health insurance was responsible for roughly the same percentage of cost (45.2%), and Medicare paid for 36.1%.”

Cost-effectivness of Opdivo/nivolumab for melanoma-

“Based on the Wall Street Journal article linked below, a chemotherapy called “Opdivo (generic name nivolumab) will cost more than $143,000 annually per patient. If your health insurance policy requires that you make a 20% co-pay for this chemotherapy, you will have to pay about $28,600.That’s in addition to all the other charges you have or will incur as a cancer patient now and in the future…

The comparison of previous melanoma therapies to Opdivo/nivolumab is the key here- mean overall survival for Opdivo? 17 months. Mean overall survival for older melanoma chemotherapies? Less than a year. Your $29k will buy you an increase in overall survival of about six months…”

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