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Gene therapy and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

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“The immunotherapy, known as anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy, puts a patient’s own immune cells through a laboratory process that results in the number of T-cells being greatly expanded

Image result for image of car-t cell therapy

This post cites three different studies that employ the same therapy-“modifying a patient’s T-cells to attack their cancer” in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) patients. The first study focuses on adult patients and the second study focuses on pediatric ALL.

While the two trials involve small numbers of ALL survivors, I thought the information was important enough and interesting enough, especially to leukemia patients, to post on PBC. In addition I don’t consider  a remission of five months as a cure. Most importantly, this therapy is being applied to other blood cancers with positive results.

Gene therapy cures three of leukemia

Tuesday 2 April, 2013

Gene therapy cures three of leukemia

Tuesday 2 April, 2013

Gene therapy cures three of leukemia


I am both a cancer survivor and cancer coach. Have you been diagnosed with Leukemia? Please scroll down the page, post question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Gene therapy cures three of leukemia

“The cured trio, who were all previously diagnosed with usually fatal relapses of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, have now been in remission for between 5 months and 2 years. Michel Sadelain of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, co-leader of the group that designed the trial, says that a second trial of 50 patients is being readied, and the team is looking into using the technique to treat other cancers…

“The stunning finding was that in all five patients, tumours were undetectable after the treatment,” says Sadelain…

Although it’s early days for these trials, the approach of modifying a patient’s T-cells to attack their cancer is looking increasingly like one that will, in time, have a place alongside more traditional treatments,” says Paul Moss of Cancer Research UK.”

More Promise With Immunotherapy in Pediatric Leukemia

“The immunotherapy, known as anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy, puts a patient’s own immune cells through a laboratory process that results in the number of T-cells being greatly expanded, “fully activated,” and then reinfused, explained Daniel W. Lee, MD, from the Pediatric Oncology Branch of the National Cancer Institute…

In a phase 1 trial, the experimental therapy demonstrated antileukemia activity in 3 of 3 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL)…”

Even More Success With Immunotherapy in Pediatric Leukemia

“Five of the first 7 children with leukemia treated with a new immunotherapy approach at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) in Pennsylvania achieved a complete response, according to a news report today…

All 7 of the children have been treated with chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells. In effect, T cells, which are one of the centerpieces of the immune system, are genetically engineered to attack leukemia…

The news about the 7 cases at CHOP follows another recent report about immunotherapy for pediatric leukemia from the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) in early April. The AACR presentation was covered by Medscape Medical News at the time.

In a phase 1 trial, another experimental therapy demonstrated antileukemia activity in 3 of 3 children with ALL, who were also treatment refractory and were treated by doctors at the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

This immunotherapy, which is also a type of anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy, is different from the CHOP approach in many ways, suggested Daniel W. Lee, MD, from the Pediatric Oncology Branch of the NCI…

Cell Therapy Shows Promise For Advanced Leukemia In Adults

“Similar immune-system therapy has proven effective in children with this cancer as well as in adults with a similar type of leukemia, however, this is the first time this specific therapy has worked in adults…

The authors point out that when the cancer returns, it is often immune to many chemotherapy drugs. Therefore, Dr. Renier Brentjens, an oncologist at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, and his colleagues set out to test a different approach.

The five participating patients received infusions of their altered T cells after undergoing standard chemotherapy. All five patients saw a total remission – for one patient this occured within just eight days, according to the researchers…

This is the first study of its kind to test the T cell therapy against adult ALL, but researchers have already explored it in some patients with advanced chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).”

 

 

 

The patients had acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a particularly aggressive form of cancer, and had all relapsed after a course of chemotherapy. Doctors then tried the experimental treatment, which involved engineering T-cells with a virus that would attack B-cells, some of which were cancerous. Researchers are as of yet unable to targe
t the virus at the cancerous cells only, and so the patients who underwent the treatment experienced severe immune reactions. However, four out of the five patients that had the gene therapy went into remission.

The patients had acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a particularly aggressive form of cancer, and had all relapsed after a course of chemotherapy. Doctors then tried the experimental treatment, which involved engineering T-cells with a virus that would attack B-cells, some of which were cancerous. Researchers are as of yet unable to target the virus at the cancerous cells only, and so the patients who underwent the treatment experienced severe immune reactions. However, four out of the five patients that had the gene therapy went into remission.
The patients had acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a particularly aggressive form of cancer, and had all relapsed after a course of chemotherapy. Doctors then tried the experimental treatment, which involved engineering T-cells with a virus that would attack B-cells, some of which were cancerous. Researchers are as of yet unable to target the virus at the cancerous cells only, and so the patients who underwent the treatment experienced severe immune reactions. However, four out of the five patients that had the gene therapy went into remission.

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