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Is GERD Due to Immune Reaction, Not Acute Acid Burn?!

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Contrary to current thinking, a condition called gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) might not develop as a direct result of acidic digestive juices burning the esophagus…

Let’s say that you have heart burn. And that your heart burn causesĀ  gastroesophageal reflux disease aka GERD. And lets suppose that you have been taking PPI’s in order to slow or stop your GERD. You have learned over the years that GERD can lead to esophageal cancer. And you don’t want to be diagnosed with cancer…
But long-term PPI use can lead to all sorts of side effects. And to add insult to injury, the study below explains that you don’t need to take PPI’s for your GERD anyhow.
So what’s the solution? The article below mentions inflammation as the reason for GERD. Maybe you should consider evidence-based, non-toxic therapies to reduce inflammation?
Curcumin has been shown to treat acid reflux. Curcumin is also anti-inflammatory. The challenge with curcumin is that it is difficult for your body to absorb. Consider one of the formulas that has enhanced bioavailability. I take Life Extension Super Bio-Curcumin. According to research, this formula is seven times more bioavailable.
Scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.
Thank you,
David Emerson
  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer
“Contrary to current thinking, a condition called gastroesophageal reflux disease might not develop as a direct result of acidic digestive juices burning the esophagus, researchers have found in an animal study…
Rather, gastroesophageal reflux spurs the esophageal cells to release chemicals called cytokines, which attract inflammatory cells to the esophagus. It is those inflammatory cells, drawn to the esophagus by cytokines, that cause the esophageal damage that is characteristic of GERD. The condition is manifested by symptoms such as heartburn and chest pain…
“Currently, we treat GERD by giving medications to prevent the stomach from making acid,” said Dr. Rhonda Souza, associate professor of internal medicine at UT Southwestern and lead author of the study appearing the November issue of Gastroenterology. “But if GERD is really an immune-mediated injury, maybe we should create medications that would prevent these cytokines from attracting inflammatory cells to the esophagus and starting the injury in the first place…”

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