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Atrial Fibrillation Increases Risk of Dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment

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Our findings underscore the importance of considering cognitive function in the management of patients with Atrial Fibrillation and the urgent need to develop evidence‐based strategies

Diagram Of Atrial Fibrillation

Insult to injury. Not only did chemotherapy cause my atrial fibrillation (AF) but the study linked and excerpted below says that I have an increased risk of dementia and MCI.

You know what I say to that? Nonsense. Just because I have an increased risk of cognitive impairment doesn’t mean that dementia is in my future.

The study concludes by saying:

“Our findings underscore the importance of considering cognitive function in the management of patients with AF and the urgent need to develop evidence‐based strategies aimed to prevent cognitive decline and improve cognitive outcomes among this patient population.”

Mental Activity, Brain Plasticity, and Cognitive Reserve

I already do consider cognitive functioning and I know of evidence-based strategies to prevent cognitive decline. By any metric I have improved my cognitive outcome over the past dozen years.

However my “evidence-based strategies” are non-toxic and non-conventional. Nutrition, supplementation, frequent but moderate exercise, brain games are only a few of the evidence-based strategies that I use daily/weekly to prevent cognitive decline.

I am both a cancer survivor and cancer coach. Do you have AF? If you would like to learn more about the evidence-bases strategies to prevent cognitive decline, please scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:

Chemobrain Coping- my list of 8 after 25 years-


Correlates of Dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Neurocognitive Study (ARIC‐NCS)

Background -Atrial fibrillation (AF) has been associated with faster cognitive decline and increased dementia risk…

In conclusion, we corroborated the association of AF with higher prevalence of MCI and dementia, found that elderly patients with AF

  • experience a high burden of MCI and dementia,
  • and identified correlates of MCI/dementia in this population.

Our findings underscore the importance of considering cognitive function in the management of patients with AF and the urgent need to develop evidence‐based strategies aimed to prevent cognitive decline and improve cognitive outcomes among this patient population.

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