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Black Raspberries Slow Esophageal Cancer

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“Researchers examined the effect of freeze-dried black raspberries on genes altered by a chemical carcinogen in an animal model of esophageal cancer…”

It may be low-tech but it works. Consuming black raspberries changes how your genes express themselves. The study linked below cites black raspberries as being an esophageal cancer fighter. Who would have thunk it?
 The preventative agent found in black raspberries may be a supplement such as resveratrol. This supplement has been shown to be apoptotic to many types of cancer including esophageal cancer. The study below points to the idea that the way to cure cancer is to change the way that a cancer patient’s genes express themselves. That killing a bunch of good and bad cells may be a short-term solution but not a curative one.
 I’m not saying that raspberries will cure your EC. I’m saying that nutrition, supplementation, and lifestyle therapies are evidence-based cancer therapies.
Thank you,
David Emerson
  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer 

Black Raspberries Slow Cancer By Altering Hundreds Of Genes

“New research strongly suggests that a mix of preventative agents, such as those found in concentrated black raspberries, may more effectively inhibit cancer development than single agents aimed at shutting down a particular gene. Researchers examined the effect of freeze-dried black raspberries on genes altered by a chemical carcinogen in an animal model of esophageal cancer…

New research strongly suggests that a mix of preventative agents, such as those found in concentrated black raspberries, may more effectively inhibit cancer development than single agents aimed at shutting down a particular gene…

“We have clearly shown that berries, which contain a variety of anticancer compounds, have a genome-wide effect on the expression of genes involved in cancer development…”

Stoner notes that black raspberries have vitamins, minerals, phenols and phytosterols, many of which individually are known to prevent cancer in animals.

“This suggests to us that a mixture of preventative agents, which berries provide, may more effectively prevent cancer than a single agent that targets only one or a few genes…

“What’s emerging from studies in cancer chemoprevention is that using single compounds alone is not enough,” Stoner says. “And berries are not enough. We never get 100 percent tumor inhibition with berries. So we need to think about another food that we can add to them that will boost the chemopreventive activities of berries alone.”

 

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