fbpx

Brain Cancer Surgery- Diagnostic Testing Can Insure Success

Share Button

Scientists at Stanford University’s School of Medicine have created nanoparticles that are able to precisely highlight brain cancer

In addition to an MRI (pictured), gold nanoparticles allow a brain tumor to be imaged phot...

 Reducing tumor burden through surgical removal of a tumor is often the first and most important step for almost all cancer cases. Brain surgery, however, is a challenge, to say the least.
As the article linked and excerpted below discusses the differences between brain cancer diagnostic methods as well as differences between brain surgeons can make an important difference in the patients overall survival.
It is important for the newly diagnosed cancer patient to understand the capabilities of not only his/her oncologist but also the resources that support his/her oncologist. Meaning, the cancer patient must research the hospital’s resources such as diagnostic testing.
I am both a cancer survivor and cancer coach. My experience and research has taught me that there is a lot more to managing a complicated diagnosis such as brain cancer than what an oncologist has to offer.

For more information about both conventional and non-conventional brain cancer therapies, scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply ASAP.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


Gold nanoparticles paint a precise picture of brain tumors before and during surgery

“Scientists at Stanford University’s School of Medicine have created nanoparticles that are able to precisely highlight brain tumors. Because the nanoparticles can be imaged in three different ways, they can be used to delineate the boundaries of tumors before and during brain surgery to ease the complete removal of tumors. The scientists have already used the nanoparticles to remove brain tumors from mice with unprecedented accuracy and hope the technique could be used on humans in the future…

 8

In addition to an MRI (pictured), gold nanoparticles allow a brain tumor to be imaged photoacoustically and using Raman imaging to better delineate the boundaries of tumors before and during brain surgery.

However, removing the entire tumor while sparing normal brain tissue is nigh on impossible for even the most skillful surgeons. This is particularly true for glioblastomas, the most aggressive form of brain tumor that features rough-edges and tiny, fingerlike projections that commonly follow the paths of blood vessels and nerve tracts to infiltrate healthy tissue.

Miniscule tumor patches, called micrometastases, which are caused by the migration and replication of cells from the primary tumor, can dot otherwise healthy nearby tissue and be invisible to a surgeon’s naked eye before sprouting into new tumors.”

 

Leave a Comment: