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Can Pediatric/AYA Cancer Late-Stage Side-Effects be prevented?

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“”Cure is no longer a sufficient goal in pediatric cancer care,” the researchers wrote. “As the vast majority of these patients survive, attention must be paid to their long-term quality of life and health challenges….””

If you read the study below you might think “gee, I don’t think a 3.6% risk of an autoimmune disease is that bad…”  But add an increased risk of heart disease, a lower I.Q., an increased risk of mental problems including depression and other possible side long-term or late-stage side effects and the chances of a pediatric cancer survivor having real health problems after 10,20,30 years really add up.

I should know. After 16 years post cancer diagnosis of multiple myeloma, I developed chronic atrial fibrillation.

But this post is not about the risks cancer survivors run after aggressive, toxic therapies. This blog post is about taking steps to prevent long-term and late-stage side effects from happening.

To learn more about identifying and preventing long-term and late-stage side effects scroll down the page, post a question and I will reply ASAP.

thank you,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:

Breakthrough in Battle Against Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)


Childhood Cancer Tied to Raised Risk for Other Ills in Adult Life

“”Cure is no longer a sufficient goal in childhood cancer care,” the researchers wrote. “As the vast majority of these patients survive, attention must be paid to their long-term quality of life and health challenges….””

Over an average follow-up of 15 to 19 years, 3.6 percent of childhood cancer survivors were treated in a hospital at least once for an autoimmune disease. That rate is 40 percent higher than among the adults who did not have childhood cancer, according to Dr. Anna Sallfors Holmqvist, of pediatric oncology and hematology at Skane University Hospital in Lund, Sweden, and colleagues…

The greatest risk of developing an autoimmune disorder was seen among adult survivors of childhood leukemia, Hodgkin’s lymphoma, kidney cancer and central nervous system tumors. Their risk was up to 60 percent higher than those who did not have childhood cancer, according to the report published online Nov. 10 in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases….”

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