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Chemo Brain Therapies in Breast Cancer

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“Cognitive function affects a variety of adults with certain diseases or neurological problems. In particular, women who previously underwent chemotherapy for their breast cancer diagnosis have an increased reporting of fogginess or forgetfulness (chemo brain).

Whether memory problems/cognitive disfunction/chemo brain/chemo fog, etc.  stems from the stress of dealing with cancer or from the toxicity of conventional therapies, or even from the cancer itself,  the fact is that breast cancer patients and survivors experience problems with their cognitive function.

The important thing for chemo brain suffers is to understand that they can heal brain function. How? While my cancer was not breast cancer, I underwent a great deal of chemotherapy (autologous stem cell transplant) and let me assure you, chemo brain is real. While my brain function will never be like it was when I was in my 20’s, the therapies listed below have improved and continue to improve my memory, facial recognition, attention, and many other brain deficiencies.

  • Exercise
  • Nutrition
  • Brain Games

I am am both a long-term cancer survivor and cancer coach. If you would like to learn specific therapies for your specific situation, scroll down the page and post a question or comment. I will reply to you ASAP.

Click now to go to the Complete Cancer Coaching Products Store-

Thanks and hang in there,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director-PeopleBeatingCancer

Articles of Interest-


Exercise improves memory in breast cancer survivors

“…In the study, more physical activity was associated with higher levels of self-confidence, lower distress and less fatigue, which in turn is associated with lower levels of perceived memory impairment.

“We found moderate to vigorous physical activity actually benefits women psychologically and that, in turn, helps their memory,” Phillips said.

Breast cancer survivors who had higher levels of moderate and vigorous physical activity — brisk walking, biking, jogging or an exercise class — had fewer subjective memory problems. Subjective memory is an individual’s perception of her memory….”

Brain Training in Breast Cancer Survivors Combats Chemobrain

“Cognitive function affects a variety of adults with certain diseases or neurological problems. In particular, women who previously underwent chemotherapy for their breast cancer diagnosis have an increased reporting of fogginess or forgetfulness. But now, there is a website that can help with just that.

In a recent pilot study, published in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham found that a brain training program – Brain HQ – helps breast cancer survivors improve their cognitive function.

Changes in cognitive function are common among patients who survive breast cancer. However, limited efforts have been put in to understanding or managing these cognitive changes in patients.

“Cognitive changes are distressing occurrence during and after treatment. Many cancer survivors who wish to return to work have difficulty with these changes and are not generally aware that there are ways to help improve cognition,” Karen Meneses Ph.D., RN, FAAN, Professor, Associate Dean for Research and co-Director of the Nursing Program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, said in an interview with CURE

Brain HQ training

However, as more research was done in this field, many started to realize the brain is, in fact, not fixed in its wiring, but rather, is constantly reorganizing and rewiring itself in response to what is asked of it.

“So, Brain HQ, what it does is it builds on the scientific understanding of brain plasticity, on how the brain changes, and implements those principles in a set of specific brain exercises, in which, quite literally doing them rewires the brain to make information processing faster and more accurate, and in doing so, improves cognitive function,” explained Mahncke…”

 

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