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Colorectal Cancer- Eat Plenty of Fiber-Reduce Your Risk of Reccurrence

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Eating a diet high in fiber can reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. For every 10 grams of fiber consumed daily – slightly less than a cup of beans – the risk of colorectal cancer is reduced by 10 percent.

Image result for image of colorectal cancer

From: John 
Subject: Colorectal Cancer

Dear Cancer Coach-

Quick question- Is roasted peanut good or bad for colorectal cancer?

John


Hi John-
To answer your question “Is roasted peanut good or bad for colorectal cancer?”, according to the AICR article linked below, Rule # 3 for reducing your risk of colorectal cancer is to eat plenty of fiber. Peanuts are listed as a good source of fiber. Further, exercise frequently but moderately, eat a diet of fruits, veggies, and whole foods, consume a modest amount of alcohol and try not to get stressd.
To learn more about the nutritional protocols you can follow to remain cancer-free, watch the video below:

I am both a cancer survivor and cancer coach. If you would like to learn more about either lowering your risk of colorectal cancer or lowering your risk of colorectal cancer relapse please scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.
Thanks
David Emerson
  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach 
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


Preventing Colon Cancer: Six Steps to Reduce Your Risk

1. Fit activity into your day

From housecleaning to running, the latest report finds that moderate physical activity – of all types – reduces the risk of colon cancer. (There was insufficient evidence to make a similar conclusion regarding rectal cancer.)

Starting Step: Find 10 minutes today to move. Whether taking a break at work or while watching TV, you can jog in place, walk the stairs, do push-ups or chair exercises. Build on that over time by taking more activity breaks or extending the 10 minutes to 30 minutes.

2. Stay a healthy weight and watch out for belly fat

One of the key findings from the CUP report is that excess body fat is linked to increased risk of colorectal cancer. The report also concludes that carrying excess belly fat – regardless of your weight – is a risk factor for colorectal cancer.

Starting Step: Become portion-size savvy. Choose smaller servings of calorie-packed foods like meats, cheese, juice and nuts. Limit desserts and sweets to two or three times a week in small portions.

3. Eat plenty of fiber

Today, the evidence is clearer than ever: eating a diet high in fiber can reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. For every 10 grams of fiber consumed daily – slightly less than a cup of beans – the risk of colorectal cancer is reduced by 10 percent.

Starting Step: Move to the AICR New American Plate way of eating: fill two-thirds of your plate with vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans and nuts and no more than one-third with animal protein such as poultry or lean red meat.4. Cut the red meat; avoid the processed

The latest CUP finding reaffirms earlier evidence: eating too much red meat and processed meat increases colorectal cancer risk. The report shows that ounce for ounce, consuming processed meat increases the risk twice as much as consuming red meat. Processed meats include hot dogs, bacon, sausage and deli meats.

Starting Step: Limit red meat consumption to 18 ounces per week – roughly the equivalent of five or six small cooked portions of beef, lamb or pork – and avoid processed meat. Try fresh roasted chicken breast, hummus or peanut butter for sandwiches.

4. Cut the red meat; avoid the processed

The latest CUP finding reaffirms earlier evidence: eating too much red meat and processed meat increases colorectal cancer risk. The report shows that ounce for ounce, consuming processed meat increases the risk twice as much as consuming red meat. Processed meats include hot dogs, bacon, sausage and deli meats.

5. Go moderate on the alcohol

The CUP report finds convincing evidence that drinking alcohol increases colorectal cancer risk in men and it probably increases the risk in women. When it comes to cancer risk, the best advice is: If you don’t drink, don’t start. For people who already drink, AICR recommends limiting alcohol to no more than two standard drinks daily for men; one for women.

Starting Step: Become aware of how much a standard drink is by measuring the following amounts and pouring it into your glassware: 5 ounces of wine, 12 oz. beer and 1.5 ounces of liquor.

6. Enjoy plenty of garlic

The CUP report judgment of the evidence suggests that a diet filled with relatively high amounts of garlic reduces the risk of colorectal cancer.

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