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Dementia, Alzheimer’s Therapy-

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All outcome measures revealed improvement: statistically significant improvement in MoCA scores, CNS Vital Signs Neurocognitive Index, and Alzheimer’s Questionnaire Change score were documented. No serious adverse events were recorded. MRI volumetrics also improved.

According to the research linked and excerpted below, a host of non-toxic therapies can dramatically improve your brain function. Improving your brain function, in this case, means that you can improve any dementia you have or prevent any dementia you may get in the future.

No, you will not take a silver bullet dementia pill to improve your brain health. You will eat, supplement, exercise, sleep, sauna, etc. your way to a better brain.

I am the proof-of-concept in most ways. I developed chemo brain after I underwent aggressive, high-dose chemotherapy (autologous stem cell transplant) in the 1990’s. Let’s call chemo brain what it is. Brain damage. I’ve spent the last twenty plus years healing my chemotherapy-induced brain damage.

I will give you a sample of my many daily/weekly brain therapies.

Stop looking for a silver bullet cure for dementia. If you would like some help getting started scroll down the page, post a question or a comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Good luck,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


Precision Medicine Approach to Alzheimer’s Disease: Successful Pilot Project

“Effective therapeutics for Alzheimer’s disease are needed. However, previous clinical trials have pre-determined a single treatment modality, such as a drug candidate or therapeutic procedure, which may be unrelated to the primary drivers of the neurodegenerative process. Therefore, increasing data set size to include the potential contributors to cognitive decline for each patient, and addressing the identified potential contributors, may represent a more effective strategy…

Results: All outcome measures revealed improvement: statistically significant improvement in MoCA scores, CNS Vital Signs Neurocognitive Index, and Alzheimer’s Questionnaire Change score were documented. No serious adverse events were recorded. MRI volumetrics also improved.

Conclusion: Based on the cognitive improvements observed in this study, a larger, randomized, controlled trial of the precision medicine therapeutic approach described herein is warranted…

Inclusion criteria were the following: age 45–76 years; cognitive impairment, as demonstrated by a combination of Alzheimer’s Questionnaire (AQ-21)>5 and either Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) of 19–26 or CNS Vital Signs <50th percentile in at least two subtests or <70th percentile for the Neurocognitive Index (NCI). Thus all patients had multiple areas of impairment as judged by their significant others or study partners, as well as cognitive testing indicative of MCI or dementia.

Exclusion criteria were the following: MoCA score <19; uncontrolled major medical illness such as seizures, cardiovascular disease, or cancer; a major psychiatric diagnosis that affected activities of daily living; ongoing psychoactive medications known to impact cognition; ongoing statin use, unless eligible to discontinue; ongoing anticoagulant therapy or history of deep vein thrombosis; MRI findings of hydrocephalus, cerebral infarct, extensive white matter disease, or intracranial neoplasm; symptomatic traumatic brain injury; lack of study partner (family member or caregiver); history of breast cancer; inability to exercise; lack of computer access; potential for pregnancy; diagnosis of a neurodegenerative disease other than Alzheimer’s disease (e.g., frontotemporal dementia); previous or ongoing treatment for MCI or dementia with the protocol used here or a very similar approach…

Treatment- Patients were treated for nine months with a personalized, precision medicine protocol that addressed each patient’s identified potentially contributory factors, and cognition was assessed at t = 0, 3, 6, and 9 months. The goal was to identify and address the factors associated theoretically and epidemiologically (though in some cases yet to be proven causally) with Alzheimer’s disease-related cognitive decline…

DISCUSSION-The proof-of-concept study reported here compares the effects of a precision medicine approach to historical controls in patients with mild cognitive impairment or early dementia (MoCA scores of 19 and higher). The magnitudes of effects, proportion of patients improved, and combinations of improvements observed here—in metabolic parameters, MoCA scores, CNS Vital Signs scores, AQ-C, BrainHQ, and MRI volumetrics—have not been reported previously. Thus the overall results support the notion that a precision medicine approach to the cognitive decline of Alzheimer’s disease and MCI may be an effective strategy, especially with continued optimization over time…

 

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