Despite Toxicity Breast Cancer Patients Can Preserve Heart Health

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“We believe that breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy should be offered a tailored exercise program based on pretreatment levels of physical function,”

If you are about to undergo breast cancer (BC) treatment or if you have recently completed BC treatment, there is a good chance that you will develop short, long-term and late stage side effects. According to the study linked and excerpted below, regular exercise can help your heart recover from the damage done by chemotherapy and or radiation toxicity.

 

I was diagnosed with chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy yesterday (1/2/19). My cancer is completely different from BC and I underwent cardiotoxic chemotherapy back in 1995 so my experiences are very different from the study below. My point is that certain chemo regimens are damaging to our hearts aka cardiotoxic…damage that can develop 20 plus years after the fact. Especially the chemo regimen anthracycline (doxorubicin). I underwent five cycles of a chemo cocktail called VAD (adriamycin is the A in VAD).

I didn’t know it at the time but there are evidence-based therapies that can protect the heart from cardio toxic chemotherapy. In addition to regular exercise, consider nutritional supplementation like CoQ10.

To learn more about DCIS and the evidence-based therapies that can help you prevent its spread into invasive breast cancer, please watch the video below:

To download the DCIS Guide, click here.
Three great reasons to exercise after a breast cancer diagnosis:

  1. Exercise Reduces Risk of Breast Cancer Relapse
  2. Exercise and Radiation for Breast Cancer
  3. Strength Training Post Mastectomy

Have you been diagnosed with breast cancer? Are you considering chemotherapy as a part of your treatment? Scroll down the page, write a comment or question and I will reply to you ASAP.

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


Exercise Preserves CV Function in Breast Cancer Patients

” A year-long structured exercise program initiated 3 weeks after surgery for breast cancer significantly attenuated expected declines in cardiovascular (CV) function as patients continued through treatment, a Norwegian randomized, placebo-controlled study found…

“You’d be surprised how little activity patients get after their diagnosis, and this is partly related to their families telling them, ‘You need to rest because you are on this chemotherapy,..’

“But patients need to be as active as they can. They will tolerate chemotherapy better and have better outcomes, so we have to convince the family not to treat the patient as if they are sick,” emphasized Osborne, who moderated the press event…

Study Details-The Energy Balance and Breast Cancer Aspect (EBBA-II) trial enrolled 545 women with stage I or II breast cancer following surgical excision of their tumor.

The mean age of patients was 55 years, and the mean body mass index was approximately 25 kg/m2. More than 70% of both groups had invasive breast cancer.

Approximately 22% of both groups also had lymph node metastases, and about 70% of women in both groups underwent breast-conserving surgery.

Slightly more than half of both groups underwent chemotherapy. About half of these patients received an anthracycline-based regimen, and some 40% received a taxane

Of both groups, 80% also underwent radiotherapy, and almost 60% were treated with some form of endocrine therapy…

“It is striking that for all these groups — whether they received chemotherapy or not — there was a really good effect of being in the physical activity program,” Thune noted.

“We believe that BC patients receiving chemotherapy should be offered a tailored exercise program based on pretreatment levels of physical function,” she concluded.”

 

 

 

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