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Recently Diagnosed or Relapsed? Stop Looking For a Miracle Cure, and Use Evidence-Based Therapies To Enhance Your Treatment and Prolong Your Remission

Multiple Myeloma an incurable disease, but I have spent the last 25 years in remission using a blend of conventional oncology and evidence-based nutrition, supplementation, and lifestyle therapies from peer-reviewed studies that your oncologist probably hasn't told you about.

Click the orange button to the right to learn more about what you can start doing today.

End-stage Multiple Myeloma- Burzynski and Antineoplaston Therapy

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Yes, I underwent antineoplaston therapy (ANP) from the Burzynski Research Institute (BRI) from 11/97-4/99.  Going from end-stage Multiple Myeloma  to MM-free is a good feeling.

Hello David- I read your story on your website. I’d like to say congratulations and I wish I could shake your hand and hug you on your story and your victory over multiple myeloma.

From your story, I understand you visited the Burzynski Clinic in Houston, Texas. I am interested in your experience. I’m interested in purchasing the book, too.
My mother has multiple myeloma and her diagnosis is not…  the best, to say. She has waited around a year trying to figure out alternative therapies. I was doing research and ran across Burzynski, then did some more researching, and found your website and your story.
I am doing everything I can in my power to show my mother and father the story and facts of Stanislaw Burzynksi. Right now my mother has been given the final “verdict” of chemotherapy and radiation.
She and I deep down desperately know there is another way. I am a 17 year old girl about to turn 18 this Thursday. I live in Fort Worth, Texas, with my mother and father.
I look forward to getting into contact with you.
Thank you for your time, Mr. Emerson, and may God bless you,
– Catherine 

Hi Catherine-
While I have been in complete remission since ’99 I don’t consider myself to be cured of MM. It is an attitude or coping mechanism on my part. Since all MMers relapse I live as anti-cancer a lifestyle as I can.
Yes, I underwent antineoplaston therapy (ANP) from the Burzynski Research Institute (BRI) from 11/97-4/99.  Going from terminal to MM free is a good feeling.
I am sorry to learn of your mom’s MM diagnosis.  Alternative therapy (exclusively) for MM is/are difficult. I cancer coach MM patients, from pre-MM through late stage MM, and believe me when I say that MMers need every weapon they can use to manage their MM.

The spectrum of therapies I recommend for MMers is encapsulated in 1-7 below.

  1. Understand the FDA approved chemotherapies for MM- Velcade, Revlimid, Melphalan,Doxorubicin, etc. All have strengths and weaknesses. All cause short, long-term and possibly late stage side effects. Understanding the possible side effects will enable you to take therapies to either reduce or prevent the collateral damage caused by a specific chemotherapy. An example would be the cardiotoxicity of Doxorubicin. Supplementing with omega 3 fatty acids reduces or eliminates the damaging affects of doxorubicin.
  2. Understand those therapies that are “integrative” to those FDA approved anti-MM chemo therapies. An example would be omega 3 fatty acids enhancing Velcade- 
  3. Understand those non-conventional therapies that studies have shown are cytotoxic (kill) multiple myeloma. An example would be resveritrol.
  4. Understand anti-myeloma nutritional therapies– again evidence-based.
  5. Understanding those lifestyle based therapies that are cytotoxic to MM.
  6. Understand those therapies, both conventional and non-conventional, that are shown to strengthen bones, enhance bone health. 
  7. Understanding evidence-based mind-body therapies that are anti-cancer. These therapies may seem a bit touchy-feely to some people but my role as cancer coach is to do the research, present the information to you and let you decide.

Please watch the video below to learn more about the evidence-based, integrative therapies to combat treatment side effects and enhance your chemotherapy.

Let me know if you have any questions.

thanks and give your mom my best.
David Emerson
  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:

Burzynski Clinic

“The Burzynski Clinic is a controversial clinic offering an unproven cancer treatment. It was founded in 1976 and is located in Texas, United States. It is best known for the controversial “antineoplaston therapy” devised by the clinic’s founder Stanislaw Burzynski in the 1970s. Antineoplaston is Burzynski’s term for a group of urine-derived peptides, peptide derivatives, and mixtures that Burzynski named to use in his “cancer treatment”. There is no accepted scientific evidence of benefit from antineoplaston combinations for various diseases…

Stanislaw Burzynski

Burzynski graduated from the Medical Academy in Lublin[1][2] earning a Ph.D. in biochemistry.[3]

Burzynski moved to the United States in 1970, working at Baylor College until 1977, when he established the Burzynski Research Laboratory where he administered antineoplaston therapy, initially to 21 patients but then more widely as “experimental” treatment. This opened him up to “charges of unethical conduct and to the suspicion he had become a merchant of false hope”, which led to several instances of media controversy.[1]:138

Burzynski founded the Burzynski Research Institute in 1984.[4] His scientific papers have caused academic controversy, with reviewers disputing the design of the trials and scientific validity of the published results.[5][6][7]

In February 2017 following lengthy hearings the Texas Medical Board recommended Burzynski’s medical license be revoked, with the revocation suspended, and a fine of $360,000 for billing irregularities and other violations.[8]

Antineoplaston therapy

Antineoplaston is a name coined by Burzynski for a group of peptides, peptide derivatives, and mixtures that he uses as an alternative cancer treatment.[9] The word is derived from neoplasm.[10]

Antineoplaston therapy has been offered in the U.S. since 1984 but is not approved for general use. The compounds are not licensed as drugs but are instead sold and administered as part of clinical trials at the Burzynski Clinic and the Burzynski Research Institute.[11][12][13]

Burzynski stated that he began investigating the use of antineoplastons after detecting what he considered significant differences in the presence of peptides between the blood of cancer patients and a control group.[14] He first identified antineoplastons from human blood. Since similar peptides had been isolated from urine, early batches of Burzynski’s treatment were isolated from urine.[14] Burzynski has since produced the compounds synthetically.[15]

The first active peptide fraction identified was called antineoplaston A-10 (3-phenylacetylamino-2,6-piperidinedione). From A-10, antineoplaston AS2-1 was derived – a 4:1 mixture of phenylacetic acid and phenylacetylglutamine.[16] The Burzynski Clinic website states that the active ingredient of antineoplaston A10-I is phenylacetylglutamine.[13]

Since 2011, the clinic has marketed itself as offering “personalized gene-targeted cancer therapy”, which has stirred further controversy, as the treatment bears no relationship to gene-targeted therapy and only superficially incorporates elements of personalized medicine.[17] The clinic’s version of personalized medicine bears little resemblance to targeted cancer therapy, as the clinic includes chemotherapy drugs and antineoplastons are part of this treatment.[18][19]

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