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Diagnosed with DCIS? Take action with evidence-based therapies you can start today.

43 peer-reviewed studies on the supplements, nutrition, and lifestyle changes that you can start today to actively prevent your likelihood of developing invasive breast cancer.  Click the pink button to the right to get started.

Is Ductal Carcinoma In-Situ (DCIS) Breast Cancer or Abnormal Cells?

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Significantly more women changed their preference from a surgical to a nonsurgical option than from a nonsurgical to a surgical option depending on terminology, according to the study…

Ductal Carcinoma in situ

You have been diagnosed with Ductal Carcinoma In-Situ aka DCIS aka pre-breast cancer. Your doctor tells you…

  • “you have noninvasive cancer”
  • ¬†“you have a breast lesion”
  • “you have abnormal cells”

What do you do? The study linked below indicates that women react more strongly to the word “cancer” than they do “abnormal cells.” How strongly you react to your doctor’s words often translates into the therapy you choose. Do you have a mastectomy, chemo, radiation or watch and wait?

What if your doctor could tell you your risk of your “abnormal cells” turning into invasive breast cancer? What if you had a good idea if your DCIS will become actual breast cancer?

To learn more about DCIS and the evidence-based therapies that can help you prevent its spread into invasive breast cancer, please watch the video below:

To download the DCIS Guide, click here.

I am both a cancer survivor and cancer coach. If you would like to learn more about the many evidence-based, non-toxic therapies to reduce your risk of a breast cancer diagnosis, please scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


Hormone Testing Could Tell Which Women with Precursor Will Develop Breast Cancer

“Researchers from the Manchester Cancer Research Centre may have figured out how to predict which patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) are likely to develop breast cancer…”

The fact is that ductal carcinoma in situ is overdiagnosed, overtreated and doesn’t become invasive breast cancer most of the time. DCIS is not breast cancer.

Terminology Used to Describe Preinvasive Breast Cancer May Affect Patients’ Treatment Preference

“When ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS, a preinvasive malignancy of the breast) is described as a high-risk condition rather than cancer, more women report that they would opt for nonsurgical treatments…

When DCIS was described using the term noninvasive cancer, 53 percent (208 of 394) preferred nonsurgical options, whereas 66 percent (258 of 394) preferred nonsurgical options when the term was breast lesion and 69 percent (270 of 394) preferred nonsurgical options when the term was abnormal cells. Significantly more women changed their preference from a surgical to a nonsurgical option than from a nonsurgical to a surgical option depending on terminology, according to the study…

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