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Recently Diagnosed or Relapsed? Stop Looking For a Miracle Cure, and Use Evidence-Based Therapies To Enhance Your Treatment and Prolong Your Remission

Multiple Myeloma an incurable disease, but I have spent the last 25 years in remission using a blend of conventional oncology and evidence-based nutrition, supplementation, and lifestyle therapies from peer-reviewed studies that your oncologist probably hasn't told you about.

Click the orange button to the right to learn more about what you can start doing today.

A Long-Term Myeloma Survivor’s Diet-

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Myeloma survivors’ goals are-“Weight loss and optimal health…marry two concepts-flexible and vegetarian…heart healthy, reduce blood glucose to increase insulin sentivity…”

I am going on record as a long-term myeloma survivor. I’m interested in only one thing. Staying in complete remission from my multiple myeloma. According to a growing number of studies diet and nutrition are critical to my achieving my long-term remission.  I stumbled on the U.S. News ratings of the “best” diets and I thought I should make an evidence-based case for what I eat, and why I eat.

Let me begin by saying that many of the diets listed in the U.S. News report make sense for cancer survivors for different reasons. I am simply reporting what I do, what I have done and why I do it (nutritionally speaking).

I will list why I follow a “flexitarian” diet:

  1. I need the flexibility of this diet. I need a diet that is “easiest to follow. I eat mostly fruits, veggies, whole grains and nuts but I do need a piece of lean red meat on occasion. And I have a glass of wine once or twice a week.
  2. I don’t need to loose weight. I gained 50 pounds when I was on dexamethasone in 1995. I lost 70 pounds over the 5 years following my autologous stem cell transplant in 12/95. My goal is to maintain my weight and muscle mass. The flexitarian diet helps me do this.
  3. The Flexitarian diet scores points on managing diabetes. That means that the diet manages a person’s blood glucose and insulin. I believe that insulin, exercise, diet, inflammation and cancer are linked.  MMers need to touch all these bases every day to stay in CR.
  4. I eat a flexitarian diet based on Time-Restricted Feeding. I consider TRF to be a simple add-on to the benefits of flexitarian eating. A bonus of sorts…
  5. In addition to the nutritional support of both the Flexitarian diet and TRF, I live an evidence-based anti-MM lifestyle based on the Multiple Myeloma Cancer Coaching Program– I follow the program because I researched and blogged about everything in the program. I believe that MM survivors need those evidence-based non-toxic therapies outlined the the MM CC program.
Going vegan can be a great benefit and help you lose weight. Look for products with a vegan certification logo on them to assure quality.  Look for vegan products that have a vegan symbol on them showing they meet good standards.

Last but not least, I don’t diet. I got serious about what I put in my body about 20 years ago. My daily routine now is just that, a daily routine. But the flexitarian diet does offer guidelines that I think MMers should understand and follow.

Let me know if you have any questions.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


The Flexitarian Diet

“Overview-

The aim: Weight loss and optimal health.

The claim: Flexitarians weigh 15 percent less than their more carnivorous counterparts; have a lower rate of heart disease, diabetes and cancer; and live an average of 3.6 years longer.

The theory: Flexitarian is a marriage of two words: flexible and vegetarian. The term was coined more than a decade ago, and in her 2009 book, “The Flexitarian Diet: The Mostly Vegetarian Way to Lose Weight, Be Healthier, Prevent Disease and Add Years to Your Life,” registered dietitian Dawn Jackson Blatner says you don’t have to eliminate meat completely to reap the health benefits associated with vegetarianism – you can be a vegetarian most of the time, but still chow down on a burger or steak when the urge hits.

Rankings

The Flexitarian Diet ranked #3 in Best Diets Overall. 40 diets were evaluated with input from a panel of health experts. See how we rank diets here.

The Flexitarian Diet is ranked:

Nutrition Plan for Multiple Myeloma Patients and Survivors to Eat Foods and Supplements that Starve Multiple Myeloma

Foods and supplements that starve multiple myeloma are a key reason why I have remained in complete remission from my multiple myeloma since April of 1999.

I am both a long-term multiple myeloma survivor and multiple myeloma cancer coach.   Though multiple myeloma is a complicated cancer, it can be managed.  There is a long and growing list of conventional (FDA approved) chemotherapy regimens for multiple myeloma. In addition, multiple myeloma patients and survivors must look beyond conventional oncology to learn about and consider evidence-based, NON-conventional forms of MM therapy as well.

The single most important statement in the Washington Post article linked below is:

““Think about what changes do I need to make to improve my chances of survival and to improve my overall well-being and my ability to cope with my disease…”

 The fact it that myeloma nutrition, integrative therapies, supplementation and other non-conventional therapies can greatly increase the chances of your surviving MM while reducing your risk of relapse, according to numerous studies.

 Multiple Myeloma (MM) patients need  a plan. Not just to learn about nutrition that fights MM but in other areas of your life as well. I reached complete remission (CR) from my MM in April of 1999. I have remained in CR to this day through research-based series of non-toxic, non-conventional anti-MM therapies including nutrition, supplementation, bone health, lifestyle, and mind-body therapies. All anti-MM, all evidence-based therapies.

Have you been diagnosed with multiple myeloma? If so what stage? Are you considering Induction Therapy? An autologous Stem Cell Transplant?


Recommended Reading:


How to exercise and what to eat after a cancer diagnosis

“A diagnosis of cancer is shocking news, but it can create a teachable moment for the patient. “Think about what changes do I need to make to improve my chances of survival and to improve my overall well-being and my ability to cope with my disease,” suggests Kevin Stein, director of the American Cancer Society’s behavioral research center.

Cancer patients first go through a period where rest is critical: the intensive phase of treatment such as surgery or chemotherapy. At this time, it’s important to follow the advice of your oncologist and other providers of medical care, said Linda Nebeling, deputy associate director of the behavioral research program at the National Cancer Institute.

The changes that survivors need to make after treatment are mostly the common-sense steps for good health that are suggested for a variety of conditions. Many groups offer diet, exercise and supplement recommendations similar to the following, from the American Cancer Society’s “Lifestyle Changes That Make a Difference,” a guide for patients, and “Nutrition and Physical Activity Guidelines for Cancer Survivors.”

Get to and stay at a healthy weight.

Be active on a regular basis.

Eat a variety of foods.

Limit alcohol consumption.

Find a local program…”

Leave a Comment:

19 comments
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Betty says 4 years ago

David,
I finally heard back from the Research hospita’ls tests. The bone marrow Biopsy shows 30% plasma cells and they want me to start Dexamethasone,, Darzalex and Pomalyst for the rest of my life. They say that even though the spike is low, with the biopsy and the PET scan, they believe that I am in real danger because of the light chains. I am going to get your pamphlet on the therapies. I did ask if I could do Velcade again as it doesn’t require a port but awaiting an answer on this. They are not offering the antibody therapy now.
My questions were implied in my last post. I was wondering about why your teachings about food and weight loss are so differing from what the doctors recommend and I really am not up to date on the therapies, just the ones that I have been through.
I have a pretty healthy diet and in the 9 market months am probably 95% local and clean produce and meat. I try and maintain a 80/20 rule of veggies to meat diet. We trade for meat at the market at the market so it’s all local and fresh and I grow and consume a lot of fresh vegetables. I am frustrated because my diet is way already better than most people’s and they are not sick but I am. I feel really good and am also frustrated that this will interrupt my growing season and putting these poisons in my body are like stabbing myself in the heart.
Any advice?

Reply
David Emerson says 4 years ago

HI Sam- yes, I thought that you were male. I’m guessing Sam is short for Samantha. You didn’t really ask any questions and you seem to have a handle on your therapies both conventional and non. Most importantly your numbers FLC’s and m-spike, all are quite low. Again, if you have lived with MM for the past nine years and your current numbers are this low then you are doing well.

Let me know if you have any questions, concerns, etc. Hang in there,

David Emerson

Reply
Betty says 4 years ago

Hello, I am an organic farmer who was diagnosed with mm 9 years ago. I had pretty much lived a clean food life and was very active, trying my best at a healthy lifestyle before the diagnosis.
I did revlimid for a year, but it did nothing but strip my digestive bacteria, my numbers climbed and 5 ribs were damaged along with 6 vertebrae. After that, Velcade which did put me in remission for the stem cell transplant. I recovered from the stem cell transplant and was in remission for 4.5 years. Out of remission now for 2.25 years but no problems until recently. Now many lesions, and the protein level is at 1.01, not high but the lesions are the issue. I have been taking the real cannabis oil for a year, measured into capsules, but I am not sure if I am taking enough or using it the right way. I appreciate any advice.

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Sam-

    Living with MM for 9 years is commendable. Re cannabis oil, because of a lack of research here in the US, there is little research for MMers to go on. But I will relay as much info as I have read in the few studies there are.

    My understanding is both cannabinoids and THC kill MM. However, the combination of the two works best especially at a 1:1 ratio. Dosing has not been studied as far as I know. Those patients (for any cancer) that use CBD oil take as much as they are comfortable with. This means that people start with a drop of CBD oil under their tongue, then graduate to two drops, then three, etc.

    Most importantly the primary strength of CBD oil is for pain management and as an integrative therapy to enhance the efficacy of Velcade. Not as a MM therapy by itself.

    I encourage you to consider other evidence-based integrative therapies as well as anti-MM supplementation, lifestyle therapies, etc.

    Do you know your current m-spike? Do you know what your kappa, lambda free-light chains are?

    Let me know, thanks.

    David Emerson

    Reply
      Betty says 4 years ago

      David,

      Thanks for your answer. This is my second reply. I did something wrong on the first one and lost it. Below are the Light Chains from my tests in January. I was sent back to the research hospital after the M protein and lesions appeared in my tests. February’s tests show a slight improvement on the Light Chains but the protein went from .96 to 1.01.
      forgot to tell you that I am a 52 year old female. I am aware that the CBD oil is not a treatment in itself, but I couldn’t find any information on how much is needed to kill the bad cells. The Oncologist that I am seeing is top in the field. He has helped to write textbooks on the subject but as you stated, I am not sure that he cares about the big picture “side effects” but just in getting the numbers down. He has not previously been interested in anything alternative so I was surprised when he mentioned the Antibody therapy for building the immune system. However, after the PET scan showed more lesions, I was told I may be too far progressed to do this now.
      I take the CBD oil at night to help with sleep as it is the main area of my health that has always been neglected. I have a terrible time sleeping and it does help with this and the pain from residual damage from before. I had read too that there was success with mm and CBD oil but again, no idea of dosage. I started with a grain of rice and now am up to about half a small pea.
      I was intrigued when I read that you said keeping your weight down is essential as the first thing I was told after diagnosis was ‘”don’t lose any weight”. I have always had a very healthy diet but also have had to work at keeping my weight down. I hover between a 12/14. I did not gain on Dexamethasone as you did but did lose 40 LBS. after the Stem cell transplant but still was only a 9/10. I started gaining back after I went into remission.

      I did wait to get the coupon code that you spoke of after watching your video but I did not see it.

      Thanks for your time and answer. This is heartening.

      KAPPA/LAMBDA LIGHT CHAIN RATIO
      10.63

      KAPPA FREE LIGHT CHAIN
      70.72 mg/L

      LAMBDA FREE LIGHT CHAIN
      6.65 mg/L

      Reply
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Elizabeth Moore says 4 years ago

I have already posted a comment.I’d value your advice

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Elizabeth Moore says 4 years ago

I am 74 and over t years from diagnosis No SCT as I had a severe depression around 3rd cyclewith.paranoia after Dex.I have Pred.40mg weekly as I am onRevlimid 15mg daily for 3weeks and a week off.I have been 26 cycles paraprotein s undetectable and SFLC in normal range for approx10 months prev CTD and Velcade bothVGpartial response and 2 drug free periods of15 months and10 months.
I am on Sol aspirin small venous clot L pper retinal vein . On Clexaneinjection as anticoagulant.I see reports that turmeric is not appropriatefor me.Doctors at myeloma clinic do not say Yes so what to do? I’d value your opinion Liz Moore

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Liz-

    Though I’m not 100% clear on everything you mention in your post, my understanding is that you have controlled your MM well over the past couple of years despite experiencing your share of complications that accompany toxic therapies. In response to your question about curcumin supplementation, several things.

    As the study linked below explains the anticoagulant properties of curcumin are not well-studied. Your oncologist might not know what to tell you re a small clot.

    Anticoagulant Curcumin-

    While curcumin does have studied, documented anti-MM properties, curcumin also has anticoagulant properties. As such combining low-dose aspirin, an anticoagulant such as Clexane and curcumin might cause problems.

    If you want to continue to control your MM consider other evidence-based therapies such as nutrition, bone health, and other lifestyle therapies.

    Thank you,

    David Emerson

    Reply
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