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Diagnosed with SMM, SPB, or MGUS?

Learn how you can stall the development of full-blown Multiple Myeloma with evidence-based nutritional and supplementation therapies.

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Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS) and HPV

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What Does It Mean for MGUS and HPV to be “Associated?” Actionable Non-Toxic Therapy is For the Pre-Myeloma Patient-

The study linked and excerpted below cites a small study of MGUS patients, 70% of whom had the HPV virus reside in their bone marrow.

Have you been diagnosed with this form of pre-myeloma? Please scroll down the page, post a question or a comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

MGUS at a glance- click the illustration below:

MGUS png Mind Map

Let me be clear. According to my research there is no evidence that HPV causes MGUS or the other way around. I am writing about MGUS and HPV because I am a long-term survivor of multiple myeloma and I had HPV at one time. I say “had” HPV for two reasons. First, this HPV virus is known to resolve on it’s own. Secondly I supplemented with AHCC (see below) to make sure that the HPV virus resolved.

Human papillomavirus infection
Papilloma Virus (HPV) EM.jpg

Based on my experience and research I believe that all stages of pre-multiple myeloma- a single plasmacytoma, MGUS and SMM can all be managed in an effort to prevent a full-blown multiple myeloma diagnosis. In addition, it is clear that HPV can be resolved as well.

To learn more about the evidence-based protocols you can follow to prevent your Pre-Myeloma from becoming Multiple Myeloma, please watch the short video below:

 

If you do not want to “watch and wait” to see if your MGUS progresses to Multiple Myeloma scroll down the page, post a question or a comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Consider MGUS Therapies such as:

  1. non-toxic, cytotoxic/apoptotic supplements,
  2. foods that starve multiple myeloma
  3. evidence-based mind-body therapies,
  4. detoxification therapies,
  5. Non-conventional bone health therapies
  6. Cannabis/CBD/THC oil

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


Human Papillomavirus Is Associated with Monoclonal Gammopathies of Unknown Significance.

“In the following study, we expanded upon our initial observation by analyzing 14 patients with MGUS…

Among 14 patients with MGUS, HPV sequences have been identified in 10 of the bone marrow biopsies. These results suggest that HPV can reside in the bone marrow of a premalignant lymphoproliferative disease.”

Human papillomavirus infection

HPV infection is caused by a human papillomavirus, a DNA virus from the papillomavirus family, of which over 150 types are known…”

AHCC: Natural Treatment for HPV?

A recent study looked at AHCC as a potential natural treatment for HPV (human papillomavirus). It examined the immune support supplement’s effect on two specific strains of the virus; the researchers concluded that daily dosing of AHCC successfully eradicated the expression of these strains in mice and may have a role in the prevention of HPV-related cancer…”

From Bench to Bedside: Evaluation of AHCC Supplementation to Modulate the Host Immunity to Clear High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Infections

Objective: There is currently no effective medicine or supplement for clearance of high risk- human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infections. We have taken a systematic approach evaluating the potential use of AHCC supplementation to support clearance of HR-HPV infections. The primary objective of this research was to evaluate AHCC supplementation to modulation of the host immune system to clear HR-HPV infections from bench to bedside.

Methods: Cervical cancer cells, CaSki (HPV16+), HeLa(HPV18+), SiHa(HPV16/18+), and C-33A(HPV), were treated in vitro with AHCC 0.42 mg/mL daily x7 days then observed x7 days with daily sample collection. A confirmatory study in cervical cancer mouse models, SiHa(HPV16/18+) and C-33A(HPV), was conducted: mice were divided into three groups per cell line then dosed with AHCC 50 mg/kg/d (N = 10), or vehicle alone (N = 10), or no supplementation (N = 10) for a total of 90 days followed by 30 days of observation. Tumors were measured 3x/week and blood samples collected bi-weekly to evaluate interferon (IFN) alpha(α), beta(β), and gamma(γ) and immunoglobulin G(IgG) by immunoassays. Tumors were evaluated for HR-HPV expression by PCR. Two pilot studies of 10 patients each were conducted in women with confirmed persistent HR-HPV+ infections. The 1st study evaluated AHCC 3g from 5 weeks up to 6 months and 2nd study evaluated AHCC 1g < 8 months. HR-HPV DNA status and the immune panel were monitored at each visit.

Results: HRHPV clearance was observed in vitro and confirmed in the animal studies as a durable response. Four of six (66.7%) patients had confirmed HR-HPV clearance after 3–6 months of AHCC 3g. Similarly, 4 of 9 (44%) patients had confirmed HR-HPV clearance after 7 months of AHCC 1g. Suppression of IFNβ <25 pg/mL was observed in those clearing the HR-HPV infection.

Conclusion: Pre-clinical in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated durable clearance of HR-HPV infections. The preliminary data from the two pilot studies suggested that AHCC supplementation supports the host immune system for successful clearance of HR-HPV infections. A confirmatory phase II randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study is ongoing.

Leave a Comment:

28 comments
Rheumatologic Disease Inc. Risk of MGUS to Multiple Myeloma - PeopleBeatingCancer says last month

[…] Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS) and HPV […]

Reply
Valerie says 7 months ago

I have recently been diagnosed with MGUS/SMM and had HPV several years ago….. is it possible that the HPV has caused this diagnosis or at a minimum contributed to this?

Reply
Cancer Coaching- Newly Diagnosed MGUS Nerve Pain - PeopleBeatingCancer says last year

[…] Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS) and HPV […]

Reply
Elevated IGG, no M-spike, Dx of MGUS- Thoughts? - PeopleBeatingCancer says last year

[…] Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS) and HPV […]

Reply
Kelsey says last year

Hello!

Thank you for this post! I’m trying to find more information on MGUS and joint pain. In your years of research have you come across anything that links the two? I’m curious if the m proteins are depositing themselves in the joints and causing inflammation and pain?

Thank you!

Kelsey

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Kelsey-

    Yes, MGUS is associated with joint pain. Or I should say that joint and bone pain is a symptom of MGUS, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    The issue, in my mind, is to try to figure out how to stop or reduce your joint pain.

    I have linked and excerpted several studies to try to figure this out.

    After reading the studies linked below, I have to say that the therapies discussed are a good place to start.

    Curcumin and omega-3 fatty acids both have been shown to kill monoclonal proteins and reduce the risk of a frank multiple myeloma diagnosis. It is also anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic.

    Omega-3-
    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25277647/
    Curcumin-
    https://www.oatext.com/Long-term-follow-up-of-curcumin-treated-MGUS-SMM-patientsan-updated-single-centre-experience.php#gsc.tab=0

    Let me know if you have any questions. Good luck.
    David Emerson

    Monoclonal gammopathies presenting as inflammatory arthritis: uncommon but important–a case series

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22709497/

    Objective: To review the clinical profile of patients with plasma cell dyscrasias presenting with inflammatory arthritis.

    Results: Four patients had monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance and two patients had multiple myeloma.

    Mean age of the patients was 65 years (range 59-74). Three patients presented with oligoarticular arthritis, two with symmetrical polyarticular joint pains and one with fleeting periarticular pains.

    Wrist and shoulder were the most commonly involved joints.

    Three patients had carpal tunnel syndrome. Five patients were seronegative for both rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies.

    Mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was high in all patients (range: 82-120 mm/h with a mean of 99.6 mm/h).

    Arthritis improved with chemotherapy in patients with multiple myeloma.

    Conclusion: Occurrence of inflammatory arthritis with plasma dyscrasias is more than a chance association.

    Plasma cell dyscrasias should be ruled out in any elderly patient presenting with atypical arthritis with disproportionately high ESR, high creatinine and hyperglobulinemia…”

    ARTHRITIS ASSOCIATED WITH MONOCLONAL GAMMOPATHY: CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    “We report nine cases of arthritis associated with a monoclonal gammapathy. Joint involvement was noted simultaneously or after the diagnosis of monoclonal gammapathy was made.

    The cases had oligoarthritis or polyarthritis mimicking rheumatoid arthritis. However, rheumatoid factor was absent in all patients, and distal interphalangeal joints were involved in two cases and sacroiliitis in one.

    The plasma cell dyscrasia was a multiple myeloma in two cases and monoclonal gammapathy of undetermined significance in the other patients.

    The light chain isotype was kappa in eight of our patients. A type I cryoglobulinaemia was associated in four cases; it was detected in the synovial fluid of two of them. We suggest that the occurrence of paraproteinaemia with chronic arthritis is more than a chance association. Moreover, a monoclonal gammapathy should be searched for in patients presenting with atypical seronegative arthritis…

    Treatment
    2 Intravenous cyclophosphamide (700 mg/m every 4
    weeks) was initiated in three cases because of vascuh’tis or glomerulonephritis (Table II).

    However, despite cyclophosphamide and plasmapheresis, the arthritis process in patient 7 did not improve.

    Melphalan was initiated in two patients for myeloma and induced remission of arthritis. Joint inflammation did not improve with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs…

    An association of a monoclonal gammapathy with RA could not be definitively excluded, although the presentations were atypical.

    Two patients had DIP joint involvement and patient no. 7 had sacroiliitis, which is rather atypical in RA. Moreover, three patients had vasculitis or glomerulopathy. In all cases, rheumatoid factor was absent.

    Natural Relief from Arthritis Pain
    https://www.healthline.com/health/osteoarthritis/arthritis-natural-relief#_noHeaderPrefixedContent

    Manage your weight
    Get enough exercise
    Use hot and cold therapy
    Try acupuncture
    Use meditation to cope with pain
    Follow a healthy diet
    Add turmeric to dishes
    Get a massage
    Consider herbal supplements

    Many herbal supplements may reduce joint pain, although scientific research hasn’t confirmed that any specific herb or supplement can treat arthritis.
    Some of these herbs include:

    boswellia
    bromelain
    devil’s claw
    ginkgo
    stinging nettle
    thunder god vine

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) doesn’t monitor herbs and supplements for quality, purity, or safety, so you cannot be sure exactly what a product contains. Be sure to buy from a reputable source.
    Always talk to your doctor before trying a new supplement, as some can cause side effects and dangerous drug interactions.”

    Reply
High FLC Ratio, No M-spike, No Crab- MGUS? Risk of MM? - PeopleBeatingCancer says a couple of years ago

[…] Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS) and HPV […]

Reply
Maitake, Shiitake and AHCC as Myeloma, HPV Therapy - PeopleBeatingCancer says 3 years ago

[…] Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS) and HPV […]

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[…] Factors- Lifestyle, Pesticides, Human PapillomaVirus,  Relatives with […]

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[…] Factors- Pesticides, Human PapillomaVirus,  Relatives with MM/MGUS, Excess […]

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Rob Lariviere says 5 years ago

If it could be HPV, then is there not anti-viral treatments for HPV that can calm the Immuglobens down and slow down the progression of myeloma ?

Reply
MGUS- Non-toxic Therapies says 5 years ago

[…] Factors- Lifestyle, Pesticides, Human PapillomaVirus,  Relatives with […]

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[…] Factors- Lifestyle, Pesticides, Human PapillomaVirus,  Relatives with […]

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MGUS- Lose Weight-Reduce Risk of Progression to MM - PeopleBeatingCancer says 5 years ago

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MGUS Increases the Risk of Blood Clots - PeopleBeatingCancer says 5 years ago

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MGUS and Fracture Risk- PeopleBeatingCancer says 5 years ago

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MGUS Nerve Pain - PeopleBeatingCancer says 5 years ago

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Newly Diagnosed MGUS Explained says 5 years ago

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