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Diagnosed with SMM, SPB, or MGUS?

Learn how you can stall the development of full-blown Multiple Myeloma with evidence-based nutritional and supplementation therapies.

Click the orange button to the right to learn more.

MGUS-“Comparatively Lower Life Expectancy?”

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MGUS stands for monoclonal gammopathy of undermined significance. MGUS is not cancer. It is a pre-Multiple Myeloma (MM) asymptomatic blood disorder.

MGUS at a glance- click the illustration below:

MGUS png Mind Map

The challenge with a diagnosis of pre-MM is that it can lead to a diagnosis of multiple myeloma, an incurable blood cancer. And according to the article below,  “Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance  cohorts have a comparatively lower life expectancy…”

MGUS may progress to multiple myeloma, AL amyloidosis, Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia, or lymphoma. But not all cases progress to malignancy.

As the article linked and excerpted below states, “““The risk of progression is approximately 1% per year,…”The important point to keep in mind is that this 1% per year persists indefinitely, I believe.””

The question is, can the pre-MM patient reduce or eliminate his/her risk progressing to MM? Yes, according to the short video linked below. According to the study talked about in the video, curcumin and diet can slow the progression of pre-MM to MM. In addition there are evidence-based therapies that act like curcumin does as an anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, etc. supplement.

I am both a long-term MM survivor and MM cancer coach. I have lived in complete remission from my multiple myeloma since 1999 by living an evidence-based, non-toxic, anti-MM lifestyle.

To learn more about the evidence-based protocols you can follow to prevent your Pre-Myeloma from becoming Multiple Myeloma, please watch the short video below:

Click here to get the FREE Pre-Myeloma Introduction Guide and follow along.

Click here to get the FREE Pre-Myeloma First Questions Guide.

If you do not want to “watch and wait” to see if your Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance  progresses to Multiple Myeloma scroll down the page, post a question or a comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Consider evidence-based, non-toxic therapies such as:

  1. non-toxic, cytotoxic/apoptotic supplements,
  2. anti-MM foods that starve MGUS
  3. evidence-based mind-body therapies,
  4. detoxification therapies,
  5. bone health therapies
  6. Cannabis/CBD/THC Oil

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


Turmeric Curcumin, MGUS, and Multiple Myeloma
Pre-MM may progress to multiple myeloma, AL amyloidosis, Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia, or lymphoma. But not all cases progress to malignancy.

MGUS: Determining Significance in Multiple Myeloma

“Much, however, remains a mystery, including the curious fact…that Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance cohorts have a comparatively lower life expectancy, “which is not entirely explained by the risk of malignant transformation.”1

“The median interval from recognition of the monoclonal protein to diagnosis of multiple myeloma was 64 months,” he (Dr. Robert Kyle) wrote in his landmark study, “of macroglobulinemia 103 months and of amyloidosis 92 months.”

“The risk of progression is approximately 1% per year,” Dr Kyle explained by phone. “The important point to keep in mind is that this 1% per year persists indefinitely, I believe.”

The risk factors for progression include the size of the serum M protein, the protein type, the number of plasma cells in the bone marrow, and the serum free light chain ratio…”


The Most BioAvailable Curcumin Formulas

“Based on a review of these studies, it is evident that better bioavailability of formulated curcumin (CU) products is mostly attributed to improved solubility, stability, and possibly low first-pass metabolism”

A search of the Pubmed database for the word curcumin yields 601 studies spaning health topics from multiple myeloma and colorectal cancer, to chemotherapies that synergizes with CU, to Alzheimer’s Disease, arthritis and more. Based on years of reading studies and personal accounts, I think it is safe to say that CU supplementation is safe and relatively inexpensive.

I have read about myeloma patients taking daily doses of CU from 400 milligrams to 8 grams (1000 milligrams = 1 gram). By almost any measure, CU is a safe, inexpensive wonder drug.

The only challenge is that CU is famously difficult to absorb in the body. In other words, a person has to mix curcumin with some sort of fat (coconut oil, chocolate, etc.) or take a brand of curcumin capsule that is already formulated to be more “bioavailable” in order to derive the full benefit of CU.

The study linked and exerpted below reviews different formulations of CU. The study itself lists the three most bioavailable formulation/brand of CU and I’ve added an excerpt from a further review from Consumerlab.com that lists four additional bioavailable brands of CU.


Recommended Reading:


Curcumin

CU is a bright yellow chemical produced by some plants. It is the principal curcuminoid of turmeric (Curcuma longa), a member of the ginger family, Zingiberaceae. It is sold as an herbal supplement, cosmetics ingredient, food flavoring, and food coloring.[1]

Bioavailable curcumin formulations: A review of pharmacokinetic studies in healthy volunteers.

“Curcumin is a widely studied natural compound which has shown tremendous in vitro therapeutic potential. Despite that, the clinical efficacy of the native CU is weak due to its low bioavailability and high metabolism in the gastrointestinal tract. During the last decade, researchers have come up with different formulations with a focus on improving the bioavailability of curcumin. As a result, a significant number of bioavailable curcumin-based formulations were introduced with the varying range of enhanced bioavailability.

The purpose of this review is to collate the published clinical studies of CU products with improved bioavailability over conventional (unformulated) CU. Based on the literature search, 11 curcumin formulations with available human bioavailability and pharmacokinetics data were included in this review. Further, the data on clinical study design, analytical method, pharmacokinetic parameters and other relevant details of each formulation were extracted.

Based on a review of these studies, it is evident that better bioavailability of formulated curcumin products is mostly attributed to improved solubility, stability, and possibly low first-pass metabolism. The review hopes to provide a quick reference guide for anyone looking information on these bioavailable curcumin formulations.

Based on the published reports,

exhibited over 100-fold higher bioavailability relative to reference unformulated CU. Suggested mechanisms accounting for improved bioavailability of the formulations and details on the bioanalysis methods are also discussed.”

According to Consumerlab.com:

“Novasol has the highest bioavailability (185 x compared to unforumulated CU), followed by Curcuwin (136 x), Longvida (100 x), Meriva (48 x), BCM-95 (27 x), Curcumin C3 Complex + Bioperene (20 x), and then Theracumin (16 x).”

Leave a Comment:

37 comments
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Mistie says 11 months ago

I am pretty sure I have MM I recently was changed from MS with neuropathy to Chronic CIPD. Treatment is not working. it has been 6 painful years and still not doing any better. IVIG just stopped due to complications. I am pretty sure that the Diag is incorrect and I am awaiting the transfer of records to UCLA to finalize for second opinion. I can tell you I am in enormous amounts of pain.
I just hope this gets figuered out soon.

Reply
    David Emerson says 11 months ago

    Hi Mistie-

    I am sorry to read of your health challenges. You are correct to want/need another diagnosis. There are many MM specialists in LA that you can
    talk to. Hang in there and good luck,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Pesticide Use Increases Risk of MGUS (Pre-Myeloma) - PeopleBeatingCancer says 3 years ago

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Newly diagnosed MGUS or SMM? To treat or watchful waiting says 4 years ago

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Debbie liberati says 4 years ago

My sister was just diagnosed with mgus. She starts chemo 6/25. You are a survivor. I’m interested in all your knowledge

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Debby-

    I am sorry to learn of your sister’s mgus diagnosis. MGUS is a form of pre-myeloma. like colon polyps, DCIS, barrett’s esophgus this is a diagnosis that causes concern but it is not cancer. Most MGUS patients live with this stage for years, many not knowing they have it. I don’t want to contradict her oncologist but I don’t believe she should begin chemotherapy. Not even low-dose. I do not want to cause concern with you both but my experience is that she must think long-term-20-30 years long-term not 10 years.

    I am happy to communicate further on this issue. It is up to you.

    Thanks,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Karen Waters says 4 years ago

I have SMM after having MGUS for at least 10 years

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Karen,

    While slowly creeping up pre-MM can cause anxiety keep in mind that there are both MGUS and SMMers who have lived with pre-MM for years, even decades. There are a host of non-toxic therapies supported by research that cite the ability to reduce the risk of full-blown MM.

    David Emerson

    Reply
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joann.g says 4 years ago

hi. i was diagnosed with MGUS at age 35. I am a caucasian female. my m spike at diagnosis was .3 I was diagnised incidentally by a hematologist that i saw for fatigue. four yrs later it is .5. I am IgG lambda. no other issues. FLC ratio normal. i live my life in fear of this and it is really taking a toll on me. i tried curcumin but it killed my stomach. any additional dietary advice? i know i am low risk by definition but i want to do everything i can to halt progression. even though it has only snuck up from .3 to .5, it still worries me because i am so young (and i hopefully have many years ahead) but those are also years where the paraprotein can continue to grow.

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Joann-

    I am sorry to read of your MGUS diagnosis. You are smart to think long-term I know if several MGUS survivors who have lived with pre-MM for years. Several things. First, yes, there are evidence-based, non-toxic therapies such as curcumin proven to reduce the risk of pre-MM becoming full blown MM.

    Regarding curcumin. Consider taking a brand of curcumin that is both highly bioavailable as well as contains ginger to calm your digestion. I will link below. Further, consider starting with one capsule (400mg) a day for some time to give your body time to get used to it.

    Regarding evidence-based therapies to reduce your risk of pre-MM becoming full blown MM, please consider the pre-MM cancer coaching guides. The guides are inexpensive and all are complete with research linked to therapies.

    Pre-MM CC guides

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    Thanks

    David Emerson

    Reply
Mick lewis says 5 years ago

Hi i was diagnosed 3 yrs ago with mgus. I am now a 48 male . In good health , eat clean and do a lot of exercise. I have my nx appointment in November. Can you explain to me what are the numbers i should ask for as all i keep getting of my doc is . Paraprotein isnow 38 .. it dont mean anything to me !! Thanks mick (uk)

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Mick-

    UK/European units of measurement is different from the US. I think you mean that your paraprotein, commonly referred to as an “m-spike” is 3.8 or maybe even .38. The definition of MM is an m-spike over 3.0. When you meet with your oncologist the first issue is to determine if you have gone from MGUS to full blown MM.

    If you have graduated to MM, you are in a very early stage. This is good as this is a prognostic indicator of longer overall survival.

    So to answer your question above, ask your onc. if you are still MGUS or now MM? Your therapy plan will vary depending. Lastly, I am both a long term MM survivor and MM cancer coach. Either MGUS or MM, if you would like to learn more about evidence based Non-toxic MM therapies let me know.

    thanks and good luck,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Charmaine Simmons says 5 years ago

Hello David. My name is Charmaine, newly diagnosed with MGUS this July 24, 2017 with an M-spike of 0.7 g/dL, the IgG type, free kappa Lt chains 21.9 mg/L, and free lambda Lt chains 35.1 mg/L. I am 59 years old. I suffer bone pain and have had peripheral neuropathy in my feet since January 2014. My doctor suggested “watch and wait” but I am beginning to order the top supplements as suggested (Omega 3, Selenium, Vit E, Chlorella, Vit D, COQ10, Tumeric Curcumen, B Complex, and Reserveratol). I am overweight for my height of 5’9″ (260 lbs) so have a new commitment to get out there and exercise by walking every day and a new zeal for an organic diet and no processed meats. Need your input for details in bone therapy, mind-body therapy and detox therapy? Also what is your input on my labs at this point.

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Charmaine-

    I am sorry to learn of your MGUS diagnosis. Though your numbers are all quite low. For example an m-spike of less than one is practically normal.

    As for your symptoms, While MGUS is considered to be asymptomatic, it is common for MGUS patients to experience PN, bone pain, etc. Your goal will be to return to normal status through lifestyle therapies such as frequent, moderate exercise (walking is great), supplementation (be sure to use the most bioavailable formulas), nutrition, etc.

    As for evidence-based bone health, mind-body and detox therapies, the 6 guides included in the pre-MM Cancer Coaching program are based on my research, are inexpensive and comes with a money-back guarantee. I will send you a link (to your email address) to the free webinar to learn more.

    Let me know if you have any other questions.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Gaela Fisher says 5 years ago

Hi, I’m so glad I found this site. An M spike was found in my blood last September, but my VA doctor overlooked it until Dec. I was sent to Hem/Oncology in January. He said he’d see me back in a year. I requested that he check my blood again at the 6 month point and he agreed. I was recently called by my Primary care physician and told that my liver enzymes are now abnormal. I’ve waited for a week for my oncologist to call, but haven’t heard from him. So frustrating! Anyway, If I show you my labs, could you suggest ways I can “treat” my MGUS? I’m eating clean, I take supplements including D2 10,000 IU, B12, Fish Oil, CoQ10 and others for specific ailments. I am unable to take the curcumin or Sacred Frankincense because of gallstones. I know this is long, please forgive me. I’m very confused and scared.

FREE KAPPA 32.4 High mg/L 3.3-19.4
*FREE KAPPA/LAMBDA 1.06 0.26-1.65
*FREE LAMBDA 30.5 High mg/L 5.7-26.3
BETA 2 MICROGLOBULIN 0.18 mg/L ><=2.51 blood

Monoclonal band in the gamma region. Immunofixation confirms an IgG-kappa paraprotein. The monoclonal spike is approximately 0.3 g/dL.
PROTEIN,TOTAL 7.3 g/dL 6.0-8.6 Details

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Gaela-

    It sounds as though you are doing almost everything you can to reduce the risk of your MGUS becoming frank MM. Your m-spike is low, your protein is with in range, your free light chains are a bit out of range but not bad so you look pretty good. My guess is that this is why your oncologist is not calling you. There are a couple of other therapies discussed in the pre-myeloma cancer coaching program but you look like you are fine.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Phillip Munsey says 5 years ago

I was recently diagnosed with MGUS, the IGA variety. I don’t know how long I have had it. Because I haven’t had a doctor until just over a year ago. The first time I saw my doctor for a physical was a year ago this last January and my Total Protein was 8.4. This past January it was still elevated and I was sent to a Hematologist / Oncologist that determined I had MGUS. He said my IGA is @ 0.9g/dl. I have been taking Curcumin, Turmeric, Resveratrol, Green Tea, Beta Carotene and Grape Seed Compound for probably ten years. Is this hereditary? Any suggestions? My doctor tells me I shouldn’t concern myself!

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Philip-

    Your m-spike is small at .9 and if you are supplementing then my guess is that your diet is also pretty clean and you also may exercise or keep active. All good. While I can’t completely agree with your oncologist to not concern yourself at all, I will say that you are pretty low risk.

    Yes, there are a few other evidence-based therapies shown to reduce your risk of advancing to multiple myeloma even more but as long as you are not experiencing any symptoms (bone pain, nerve pain, kidney damage) I would say that you are fine.

    How old are you? Any other health issues?

    David Emerson

    Reply
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