What I wish I knew about Multiple Myeloma treatments 25 years later...

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Cautious Optimism for CAR-T Cell Therapy in Multiple Myeloma

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CAR-T therapies require a complicated process of extracting immune system T cells from an individual patient, altering their DNA to sharpen their ability to spot and kill cancer cells

(Ed. Note- update- CAR T-cell therapy is being trialed as of 10/18) Multiple Myeloma (MM) is an incurable but treatable blood cancer. Oncology calls MM treatable because there is a long and growing list of FDA approved MM therapies. The article linked and excerpted below indicates that CAR-T cell therapy may be another of the long and growing list of MM therapies.

T lymphocytes and cancer cells, SEM

 It is important for MM patients to understand that there is also a long and growing list of evidence-based but non-conventional MM therapies too.

Several years of aggressive conventional therapies, including an autologous stem cell transplant  put me into remission for only months. It was antineoplaston therapy from the Burzynski Research Institute that put me into complete remission. But that’s another blog post.More than most MMers I hope that CAR-T cell therapy results in permanent MM remission. But I’ll settle for most MMers achieving a long remission.

T lymphocyte cells (blue) attached to cancer cells.
Steve Gschmeissner / Science Photo Library/Getty Images
I was diagnosed with Multiple Myeloma in early 1994. Experience and research has taught me that MMers must utilize the best of both conventional (FDA approved) and evidence-based non-conventional therapies to manage their MM.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


Chinese cell therapy effective in small multiple myeloma trial

A small trial conducted in China found that an experimental therapy using altered cells to recruit the body’s immune system to attack cancer can induce remission in most patients with advanced multiple myeloma, a blood plasma cancer…

CAR-T therapies require a complicated process of extracting immune system T cells from an individual patient, altering their DNA to sharpen their ability to spot and kill cancer cells, and infusing them back into the same patient…

…out of 19 trial patients followed for more than four months,

  • 14 reached complete remission.
  • One patient had a partial response and
  • four patients reached “very good partial remission,”

but the cancer did get worse in one of those patients.

Eighty five percent of trial patients experienced cytokine release syndrome (CRS), a potentially life-threatening inflammatory condition…Two people had severe CRS, but recovered after treatment with Actemra, an anti-inflammatory drug.”

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