What I wish I knew about Multiple Myeloma treatments 25 years later...

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Multiple Myeloma-Curing Cancer Shouldn’t Always be the Goal

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Cancer Coaching-“Sometimes patients and their doctors can manage cancer (MM) so successfully that it may seem to go away. Unfortunately, it doesn’t. And it could still go rogue at any time…”

Please understand the point of the article linked and excerpted below. If conventional oncology could cure mulitple myeloma (MM) it would. Unfortunately, conventional oncology cannot  cure your MM. Or what your oncologist refers to as “curative therapy”  might cost you a host of deadly potential side effects. Whereas, managing your MM might give you a higher quality of life until you die years from now.

Conventional oncology considers my cancer, multiple myeloma, to be incurable. Yet, the standard-of-care therapy plan for a newly diagnosed MM patient is induction chemotherapy (RVd) followed by an autologous stem cell transplant and low-dose maintenance therapy.

The standard-of-care therapy plan for MM patients  is a LOT of chemotherapy and therefore a LOT of toxicity. And as we all know, the more toxicity the greater the risk of side effects.

This multple myeloma standard-of-care has a “curative-intent.”

I fully understand why most multiple myeloma patients want to be cured. Or at least they want to try for a cure. I was the exact same way when I was diagnosed in ’94 at the age of ’34.

But now that I’ve lived through the good, the bad and the ugly of MM, now that I have been studying MM and working with newly diagnosed MM patients, I believe that it is the responsibility of my medical professionals such as my oncologist, Dr. Nate Berger to explain, in painful detail, what can and cannot be achieved, realistically, for the MM patient.

At least M.D.s should give MM patients the risks and benefits of high-dose chemotherapy.

I have lived with my incurable cancer since early ’94. I do so by living an evidence-based, non-conventional, non-toxic, anti-MM lifestyle, Most if not all cancers have identified similar therapies.

I am both a multiple myeloma survivor and MM cancer coach. To learn more about these therapies please scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • Multiple Myeloma Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


Curing cancer isn’t always the goal. Sometimes you just want it to be a manageable chronic disease

“If you can’t beat ’em, manage ’em….Millions of patients live by that rule every day — patients with chronic conditions that can’t be cured but can be kept under control with the right combination of medication, diet and lifestyle choices…

Sometimes patients and their doctors can manage cancer so successfully that it may seem to go away. Unfortunately, it doesn’t. And it could still go rogue at any time. But in the meantime, treating cancer like a chronic illness can often reduce both the financial cost and the physical risks of intensive treatment…

Consider prostate cancer. Traditionally, the recommended treatment has been radiation or removal of the prostate. Both approaches offer a good chance of a cure; regrettably, they also come with sizable risks, including impotence and incontinence

But it’s now possible for many patients to avoid these risks, says Dr. Inderbir Gill, executive director of the USC Institute of Urology, because doctors have learned to distinguish between more and less dangerous prostate cancers. In many cases, patients with less dangerous varieties can safely opt for localized treatment, or even no treatment at all.

Not treating prostate cancer isn’t the same as doing nothing. Doctors keep very close tabs on the cancer using “active surveillance.” Then they take action if — and only if — it’s needed

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