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Recently Diagnosed or Relapsed? Stop Looking For a Miracle Cure, and Use Evidence-Based Therapies To Enhance Your Treatment and Prolong Your Remission

Multiple Myeloma an incurable disease, but I have spent the last 25 years in remission using a blend of conventional oncology and evidence-based nutrition, supplementation, and lifestyle therapies from peer-reviewed studies that your oncologist probably hasn't told you about.

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Multiple Myeloma Diet- Tips

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Proper Nutrition is Critical to Managing Multiple Myeloma (MM)-The Problem is that Food Sounds and Smells Awful Sometimes During Active Treatment

Proper nutrition is essential to the multiple myeloma patient as he/she goes through active therapy.  The article below should be about eating when food sounds and smells awful. Maybe its just me but I had the greatest problem with food smells while on dexamethasone. And I’ve talked to other MMers who talked about dex as causing foul moods and problems with food.

The reason for adding the article below from WebMD is that the article really does offer info that may help you with food. While undergoing cancer therapy it is important to stay strong (well, as strong as possible). And proper nutrition can help.

One more short personal note. I swear by two tricks,  food-wise, when undergoing chemo and or radiation.

 

  • I made smoothies out of fruit, veggies, protein powder, kefir, dark chocolate, peanut butter, etc. Easy, Nutritious, Fast (to clean-up)
  • I mixed ice cream with Boost. Nothing gourmet here, just getting some vitamins and minerals into me when I didn’t want to think about food.

For more information about cancer issues and lifestyle therapies that will make your cancer journey easier, scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply ASAP.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • MM survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


How to Eat When Chemo Kills Your Appetite

“You might not feel hungry when you’re having chemotherapy, but it’s important you keep eating well. Nutritious food keeps up your strength, fights fatigue, and helps your body heal. Here are 11 healthy tips to think about, even when food is the furthest thing from your mind:

Fight off nausea. It’s tough to eat when even the thought of food makes you sick. Fend off an upset stomach with dry foods like crackers. Eat them first thing in the morning, then every few hours. Sip ginger ale or ginger tea throughout the day. Ginger, lemon, lavender, and peppermint can also help settle your stomach.

Eat your favorite foods. Your appetite, and the foods that appeal to you, can change from day to day. It’s OK to eat high-fat, high-calorie foods you normally try to stay away from, or to eat, say, breakfast foods for dinner. For now, eat what sounds good, when it sounds good.

Try small meals. Many people who get chemo find they have more of an appetite when they eat every few hours. Try having six to eight small meals a day rather than three big ones.

Make it easy. You won’t want to grocery shop or cook on some days. Plan ahead and keep your pantry stocked with easy-to-prepare foods. On days you feel well enough to cook, make extra portions and freeze them for later. Ask friends and family to help you shop and prepare meals, or consider getting your meals delivered.

Sip liquids throughout the day. Staying hydrated helps your body get rid of toxins, but drinking too much at once can make you too full to eat. Try to drink most of your fluids between meals, rather than during. It’s best to make sure you get plenty of water. But if you’re losing weight, you may want to drink high-calorie liquids like fruit nectars, milkshakes, or cream soups.

Add calories to healthy foods.Your body needs fat to keep up energy stores and move vitamins through your blood. Top salads with avocado or seeds, and add olive oil to rice and pasta or dip your bread into it. Liquid meal replacements can be another good option.

Make mealtimes an event. You tend to eat more when you’re distracted. Eat while you watch TV or listen to music. Or invite a friend over to keep you company during meals. The social support can help you feel better, too.”

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6 comments
Barbara Cochran says 8 months ago

I want to know how to purchase the basic I would like to talk to a live person. Please email how to contact u

Reply
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Mike McKeever says 5 years ago

David I met Dr. Berenson in Chicago on June 4th at a cancer convention and was very impressed with him. We have kept in communication and I value his expertise and my time with him. We have continued to communicate. I am interested in your Silver package, but am asking for more details of how the programs works. Please give me some details and let me know if I have to be a member of Facebook to join this package, as I am not a social media fan.

Thanks,

Mike

Thanks,

Mike

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Mike-

    I’m not a big social media participant either. However I have seen how MM survivors benefit when they ask each other questions. Also MM CC clients are spread through the US and english speaking world.

    The silver package will include all of the MM CC guides which will cover those MM issues that I believe are important to MMers.

    How the program works is simple enough. Upon purchasing the silver package the info will automatically download to your inbox and I will be notified to “invite” you to join the closed Facebook group. Yes, FB requires you to have a FB page to join a closed group. Creating your own page requires nothing but a little time on your part. You do not have to friend anyone or message anyone if you don’t want to.

    In case you are wondering what a “closed” FB group is, only approved members can read or post in a closed group. I decided that MMers might prefer to communicate only with fellow members. I am the administrator. I post studies and research I find. I reply to all posts as well as other members.

    Let me know if you have any questions. I look forward to working with you.

    David Emerson

    Reply
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