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Recently Diagnosed or Relapsed? Stop Looking For a Miracle Cure, and Use Evidence-Based Therapies To Enhance Your Treatment and Prolong Your Remission

Multiple Myeloma an incurable disease, but I have spent the last 25 years in remission using a blend of conventional oncology and evidence-based nutrition, supplementation, and lifestyle therapies from peer-reviewed studies that your oncologist probably hasn't told you about.

Click the orange button to the right to learn more about what you can start doing today.

Multiple Myeloma- Intravenous Vitamin C Therapy

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Intravenous vitamin C (ascorbic acid and L-ascorbic acid) therapy is the ideal integrative, complementary, non-toxic, evidence-based therapy for multiple myeloma patients and survivors.

…at least it is from my perspective as a long-term MMer and MM cancer coach. I believe that conventional chemotherapy regimens such as Velcade, Revlimid, Darzalex, etc. can kill MM.  A two chemo regimen (doublet) kills more MM than a single regimen, a triple regimen kills more MM than a doublet, etc. etc.

Achieving remission after induction therapy, especially if you have minimal side effects is a great feeling. The two challenges for MMers are:

  1. collateral damage aka side effects from toxic therapies and
  2.  MDR aka multi-drug resistance. Side effects can increase with the more chemo you have and the day will come when you relapse and conventional chemotherapy regimens no longer work.

The articles linked and excerpted below spell out how intravenous vitamin-C therapy kills or will weaken myeloma exposing your cancer to being killed by cytotoxic therapies or the evidence-based nutrition, supplementation and other therapies that show results in myeloma therapy.

If you or a loved one have been diagnosed with Multiple Myeloma, let me say this loud and clear:

It is critical that you become an active participant in your care. Learn everything you can.

I am alive today largely because I took the time to find out everything I could about Multiple Myeloma and sought out the full spectrum of evidence-based MM therapies both conventional (FDA approved) and non-conventional.

Your decision-making begins by learning about the full spectrum of evidence-based myeloma therapies, both conventional and non-conventional.  To learn more about the Multiple Myeloma Coaching Course, click here.

If you would like to learn more about managing your MM with both conventional and non-conventional therapies, scroll down the page and post a comment. I will reply to you ASAP.

Hang in there,
David Emerson
  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Articles:


Multiple Myeloma Tumor Cells are Selectively Killed by Pharmacologically-dosed Ascorbic Acid

“Multiple myeloma (MM) remains a difficult to cure disease in the majority of cases. Several preclinical and clinical studies have shown that ascorbic acid in pharmacologic doses (PAA) selectively kills cancer cells while sparing normal cells. This article reveals the biological mechanism by which PAA exerts its anti-cancer effects and should lead to the development of an innovative therapy in MM…”

Why high-dose vitamin C kills cancer cells

“Vitamin C breaks down to generate hydrogen peroxide, which can damage tissue and DNA. The new study shows that tumor cells with low levels of catalase enzyme activity are much less capable of removing hydrogen peroxide than normal cells, and are more susceptible to damage and death when they are exposed to high doses of vitamin C…

Most vitamin C therapies involve taking the substance orally. However, the UI scientists have shown that giving vitamin C intravenously — and bypassing normal gut metabolism and excretion pathways — creates blood levels that are 100 — 500 times higher than levels seen with oral ingestion. It is this super-high concentration in the blood that is crucial to vitamin C’s ability to attack cancer cells….”

Vitamin C in complementary oncology–update 2009.

“The antioxidant perhaps most widely used in complementary oncology is vitamin C, particularly by intravenous injection. In light of the recent clinical pharmacokinetic findings, the in vitro evidence of anti-tumor mechanisms and some well-documented cases of advanced cancers the role of high-dose intravenous vitamin C therapy in cancer treatment should be reassessed…”

Multiple Myeloma Therapy- PAA aka Intravenous Vitamin C

Pharmacologically-dosed ascorbic acid (PAA) selectively kills CD138+MM tumor cells derived from MM and smoldering MM (SMM)

Leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma all have a robust collection of FDA approved,  standard-of-care conventional therapies that your oncologist can provide. Unfortunately, these blood cancers often relapse. Once your multiple myeloma becomes resistant to conventional therapies you reach MDR. Further, all toxic conventional therapies cause short, long-term and late-stage collateral damage that may limit their use. Consider PAA aka intravenous vitamin C.

Whether you are looking for a first-line multiple myeloma therapy, integrative therapy or refractory therapy, there may come a time when you want to learn about non-conventional therapies for your blood cancer.

Intravenous vitamin C  is an evidence-based non-conventional multiple myeloma therapy that can treat your MM.

I was diagnosed with multiple myeloma in early 1994. I underwent several years of aggressive conventional therapies such as an autologous stem cell transplant. My oncologist told me that there was nothing more that she could do for me in September of 1997.

I have remained in complete remission from my “incurable cancer” since 1999 by living an evidence-based, non-toxic, anti-MM lifestyle through nutrition, supplementation, bone health, etc.

Please watch the video below to learn more about the evidence-based, integrative therapies to combat treatment side effects and enhance your chemotherapy.

MM patients and survivors must look beyond convention myeloma therapies if they want to manage their myeloma for the long-term.

For more information about evidence-based, non-conventional therapies for your multiple myeloma, scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply ASAP.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • MM survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


Our Next Show: The Myeloma-Killing Effects of Intravenous Vitamin C

“Today’s myeloma therapy can help patients gain remission, but the combinations can cause their own side effects because they target normal cells as well as cancer cells. Investigators at the University of Iowa including Dr. Guido Tricot and Dr. Frank Zhan have tested mega-doses of Vitamin C in combination with the standard chemo melphalan and found that the Vitamin C can kill myeloma cells while not affecting normal cells…”

Multiple Myeloma Tumor Cells are Selectively Killed by Pharmacologically-dosed Ascorbic Acid

High-dose chemotherapies to treat multiple myeloma (MM) can be life-threatening due to toxicities to normal cells and there is a need to target only tumor cells and/or lower standard drug dosage without losing efficacy.

We show that pharmacologically-dosed ascorbic acid (PAA), in the presence of iron, leads to the formation of highly reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting in cell death. PAA selectively kills CD138+MM tumor cells derived from MM and smoldering MM (SMM) but not from monoclonal gammopathy undetermined significance (MGUS) patients. PAA alone or in combination with melphalan inhibits tumor formation in MM xenograft mice. This study shows PAA efficacy on primary cancer cells and cell lines in vitro and in vivo

UI researchers discover vitamin C may offer new treatment option for multiple myeloma

“University of Iowa researchers in the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center Multiple Myeloma Program recently found evidence that mega doses of vitamin C delivered intravenously may offer new hope to people diagnosed with multiple myeloma. The results of their study were recently published in the international journal EBioMedicine…”

 

 

Leave a Comment:

70 comments
Bruce Miller says last week

I have tried vita c therapy but it doesn’t seem to be as effective as o3 therapy with uv exposure. Vita c therapy increases pain but o3 and uv reduces it to a minimum. Have you had any experience with that?

Reply
    David Emerson says last week

    Hi Bruce-

    The study linked in the post is talking about the cytotoxicity of intravenous vitamin C to MM cells. I no nothing about IVC and pain.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Riccardo Dominic Arcaro says a few months ago

I was diagnosed with stage 1a multiple myeloma on 4/11/2011. I received stringent complete remission with Revlamid with Velcade lasting 5 years. In 2012 I began receiving weekly infusions of vitamin C. My light chains increased in 2012 and I began receiving Ninlaro with weekly dexamethasome. SCR was achieved until 4 months ago. Have begun Pomalyst, Darzalex and Dexamethasome. Light chains have decreased from 230 to 90. I continue weekly infusions of vitamin C. I eat blueberries, apples, lemons, turmeric and ginger each morning.. I work out each morning for 45 minutes. I also pray the Rosary daily. I consider myself very lucky and pray each day for those suffering from the scourge of cancer

Reply
    David Emerson says a few months ago

    Hi Riccardo-

    You appear to be an excellent example of the combination of conventional therapies with evidence-based, non-conventional therapies. Excellent and
    keep in touch- let me know how you’re doing if you think of it.

    Thanks very much,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Robert Patterson says 6 months ago

At early stages of MM with lots of fatigue and and general pain My question is what was the daily dose of IV Vit c you received and how often? thanks

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 months ago

    Hi Bob-

    I am sorry to learn of your MM diagnosis, fatigue, pain, etc. To answer your question, several things.

    First, I have never had IVC therapy. I supplement with oral vitamin C. I supplement with about 3000 mg daily. The powder I use also contains a heart health component. Lastly, I like being able to stir the powder into my juice every am.

    Intravenous Vitamin C has been shown to actually kill MM cells. The dose depends on a number of factors. The study that I linked in the blog post talks about “time and dose dependent manner.”

    I think the patient must use a clinic for IVC administration and each session costs money. My point is that there is
    time and money associated with IVC that I don’t have to deal with for oral powder.

    David

    Reply
Toni-Lyn Ambrosino says 7 months ago

I’m currently relapsed after an autologous SCT in feb 2018 and am currently on Kyprolis, Pomalyst, and Dex. I’m wondering if I can receive high dose iv vitamin c while I’m on my chemo regimen?

Reply
    David Emerson says 7 months ago

    Hi Toni-Lyn-

    The science is mixed on IVC during chemotherapy. The safe thing for you, in my opinion, is to undergo IVC either before or after (a couple of days) your infusion of any of the chemo regimens you list.

    Thanks,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Paul says 10 months ago

Hello , I was wondering if vitamin C injections will keep me in remission after the BMT transplant which I made back in 2014

Presently the levels of Lambda are again increasing beyond the normal but they are not skyrocketing ….they are high but doctor said we can wait more before we start some treatment …presently lamda is 110 (maximum normal is 27) ….I was wondering if there is a way I can stop the lambda from increasing before the doctor puts me on some treatment …:he requested one more blood test after a month from now and if the lambda showed higher he will then start some treatment ….:do you think the vitamin c injection if I start them from now , will they help decrease my lambda levels ?? Pls let me know the soonest !

Thx
Paul

Reply
    David Emerson says 10 months ago

    Hi Paul- I replied to your question directly via email.

    David

    Reply
Roseanne KIng says 11 months ago

Hello, I am a recently diagnosed with MM, I have had a 2nd treatment of Valcade, steroids, and waiting for Reviled to be approved. I was reading about complementary cancer care support, and will start taking, supplements, Mushrooms, Etc. I was wondering about the Vitamin C therapy. I read
some where that that interferes with Chemo (valcade) and should do after remission.

What are your thoughts on that ?

Thank you,
Roseanne King

Reply
Kimberly says last year

Please help, my dad has MM and they found many lesions on his spine.

Reply
Cathy Steele says last year

I have another concern I wanted to ask you about concerning your program. Some of the therapies that you list might be above our means. I hear some people are doing two or three IVC’s a week, and our finances would not support that. Additionally you mention hyperbaric treatment. While I have never heard a cost for that, I have heard it is expensive. Will I find myself receiving recommendations for things I just cannot do?

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hello again Cathy,

    To be honest, I have no idea what IVC or HBOT costs in NZ, CA, USA, UK, France, Eastern Europe, India, China, Japan, etc. and the many other countries where our clients hail from. Further, I have no idea what therapies you can do or not do.
    Good luck and hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
ALYS Telmic says last year

Hi David.
Thank you so much for your time and energies to put this together for other individuals
that share this disease.
I was diagnosed in 2016-17, It has been wow… I am now going for more of the nutritional and not so much of the trials and chemo route. I am interested in your directed way of beating MM. Please tell me what I would need to do.
Sincerely
Alys

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Alys,
    I replied to your post directly to you via email.
    David Emerson

    Reply
Joanna says last year

Hi Dave, I was diagnosed with early stage active MM on 6/23. I have a IgA Kappa MM; M-Spike of 1.2, FKLC 71.7, FLLC 5.2, K/L ratio 13.8, IgA 1,361.
I’m following an integrative protocol with the Mederi Center, Oregon. I’m also adding some non conventional therapies to my regime. I’ve just started HBOT weekly. I have delayed conventional treatments until I can review my treatment options and I’m having a second opinion with Dr James Berenson next week. My oncologist at Stanford will be reviewing my case in October. I would value your opinion on the-most effective adjunct therapies to use until then – HBOT, IV vit C, ozone therapy or hyperthermia.
Thank you,
Joanna

Reply
Stage 3, Aggressive Multiple Myeloma Diagnosis- PeopleBeatingCancer says last year

[…] I’ve found a place about an hour from me that does IV Vitamin C (as well as other IV nutrition) but the cost is not cheap! […]

Reply
Toni says last year

Hi David,
I was diagnosed with MM in February 2020, right in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic. I was stage 3 and it was aggressive. A year prior I had started having issues with back pain and started seeing a chiropractor 3x per week just to stay functional. Late October 2019 I bent over in the shower to pump facial wash into my hands and it felt as if a horse had kicked me. I was misdiagnosed with a sprain, but ended up in the ER on December 19, 2019 with severe back pain at which time an x-ray revealed a spinal fracture and Osteopenia. A follow up bone density test showed severe osteoporosis. At 50 I had the back of a 95 year old!

January 21st, 2020 I had a regular appointment with my endocrinologist – who didn’t like some of the results on my most recent blood test. He ordered more tests, which resulted in a whirlwind of more tests: more blood work, 24 hour urine test, scans, bone marrow biopsy and finally an appointment with an oncologist. By the time I met with the oncologist, the diagnosis was already made and the only thing the oncologist needed to do was discuss and schedule treatment.

March 13th, 2020 I started to receive Kyprolis via IV once weekly for 3 weeks on, 1 week off. I was supposed to start Revlimed too (also 3 weeks on and 1 week off), but I refused (to my oncologist surprise and frustration). I tend to react to some drugs so I didn’t want to load my body where I wouldn’t know which one was the culprit, so I eased into treatment. My proteins were over 9000 when I started and my hemoglobin was critical at 6.6 and I had to receive a blood transfusion on my very first treatment date. But by the end of my first round (3 weeks), I had made a 75% improvement – only taking Kyprolis, along with added supplements I had started. Oh, and they give me Zolmeda to strengthen my bones.

The last week in March I had spinal surgery to repair multiple spinal fractures – the first one resulted in more, but once I had surgery, got a walker, and gave myself permission to just not worry about stuff I shouldn’t, I am now able to get around better. Gravity hurts, so I can’t stand or walk longer than 3-5 minutes or I’m in a lot of pain. Originally doctors had me on muscle relaxers, hydrocodone and morphine. I didn’t want to live my life on opiates so I got a medical marijuana license which helps.

I did my 2nd round of treatment without Revlimed as well. I was simply too sick after the Kyprolis to add it in. I started Revlimed at the start of my 3rd round at 25mg, but I had a reaction and the oncologist reduced it down to 15mg. At the end of my 4th round – what I thought was going to be my last, the oncologist told me my proteins were at .4 – obviously huge improvement from over 9000, but he said he was greedy and wanted to see if I could get to zero. Ugh.

I didn’t take this news well as I’d been complaining of symptoms for months – severe and violent chills in which I turned bluish-purple, shook uncontrollably, needed to cover up under 3-4 doubled blankets, while lying on a 2 ft. heating pad set to high and it would take four hours to get my body warmed up. I’d run a fever of 103 or 104, I’d be nauseated and experience violent projectile vomiting. Then the diarrhea would start and last for 4 or more days (up to 10 – 12 times per day). I told the oncologist I wasn’t moving forward experiencing that anymore. When I asked him how he determined the Kyprolis dose, he said height and weight. I asked him what the symptoms would be if 10 different women of all the same height and weight were given the same dose and he said it would vary. Therefore, I said, he must adjust my dose based on how MY body was reacting, not some general dose based on my height and weight. He finally agreed, but I was pretty pissed I had to confront him like that after mentioning those symptoms for months.

Tomorrow, July 10th, 2020 will be the start of my 5th round. I will admit I don’t take the Revlimed regularly as prescribed. The shit comes in a bio-hazard bag and the list of side effects is insane. I simply do not want to take it. On top of that, the price tag is over $20k for 21 pills (insurance pays it, thank God!).

I actually feel pretty good – and at the end of my 4th round, all of my blood work was excellent – I wasn’t high or low in any area. My only real complaint is my bones: they are weak, thin, and full of lesions. But I’m concerned about what happens after my 5th round of treatment. I do not want to be on a “maintenance dose” of Revlimed. I’d rather not take it at all. I’ve found a place about an hour from me that does IV Vitamin C (as well as other IV nutrition) but the cost is not cheap!

I was eating a keto diet prior to diagnosis which helped me lose 78 pounds, take my A1C from 11.4 to 5.3 in only 8 months, and take me from diabetic to non-diabetic. This eating style is definitely void of sugar, but it does contain meat and dairy and I have never felt better! I love it because I’m never bloated and I have plenty of energy. But a lot of what I read says MM patients should eat mostly vegetarian. I rarely eat red meat or pork. Most of the meat I eat is chicken, fish, salmon, shrimp, etc. I like my meat and I don’t want to give it up. In fact, I couldn’t eat a lot of what vegetarians eat as it would raise my blood sugar (breads, pastas, potatoes, rice, oats, etc). I eat a wide variety of veggies every day, drink several cups of green tea daily on top of lots of fresh filtered water. I take a lot of supplements, from milk thistle, artichoke, turmeric, vitamin D, several B vitamins, calcium, magnesium, and more, plus I take some potent pro and pre-biotics. I try to get 15 minutes of sunlight daily but I can’t exercise right now due to my bones. I did buy a full-spectrum infrared sauna, but it’s still in the box because we’re planning on moving soon and it will be easier to move the sauna while in it’s original box. I also ensure I get plenty sleep and I keep stress at a minimum.

I’m not striving for perfection, but I know with no current cure, I have to stay on top of the MM. I’d love to see an integrative medical doctor and get their IV vitamin C and other therapies, but again, the cost is not cheap. How do people afford this?!?! And until I can afford it, am I doing enough? Did you do any maintenance drugs, and if so, for how long? Or were targeted drugs available when you were being treated? I’ve read your body can build up a tolerance to these targeted drugs – so why bother? I believe I read that you did a stem cell transplant, is that correct? My oncologist says it requires a very high blast of toxic chemo – which is different than the targeted therapies I’m receiving now. I apparently can’t get the stem cell transplant without the high dose of chemo, so I won’t be getting a stem cell transplant as I won’t do that type of chemo. Ever.

Anyway, I’m very inspired by your story and am trying to read something on your site each day. I’m considering the coaching, simply to soak up as much knowledge as I can. I’ve read no less than 20 books or so since being diagnosed trying to educate myself on cancer, how it works, and how we can heal our bodies to fight/ward off cancer naturally. Most books cover cancer in general or lean towards cancers like breast, prostate, lung, brain, etc. Finding your site that is focused on MM is a blessing and I thank you for sharing and offering your help to others with it.

God Bless and I’ll be tuning in regularly!

Toni

Reply
Richard D. Rowland says last year

Hello David and congratulations on your long term success dealing with myeloma.
I was diagnosed in August of 2008. I received an unsolicited prognosis of living 3 years from two doctors. I walked away from western medicine at that point and stayed away for 2.5 years, while I learned that all important balance between what western medicine offers and the best of the alternatives. Although not in a true remission, I have been successful in coexisting with myleoma for almost 12 years now..
The only drugs I have used to treat myeloma have been revlimid/zometa. In the past 12 years I have used revlimid 4 times and zometa quarterly.
I became an author, with one book published and another coming out next month. I also mentor people facing life ending challenges, including myeloma. I am also a inspirational speaker.
I am extremely interested in your regime, especially the Vit C IV treatment. Can regular oncology docs use this treatment or do I have to find an integrative doc? I am going to send a link to this site to a trusted myeloma doctor that is quite open to alternatives.
I am looking forward to communicating with you about this and all other myeloma issues. So glad a friend guided me to you. Let’s run with it.
Richard D. Rowland

Reply
Eva Berriman says last year

Thank you so much for your inspiring journey and for having made it your mission to teach and help those with MM.

Next week I will start my very first chemo session. My Oncologist, a MM specialist recommended the KRD regimen.

Would you suggest that I ask whether I could get high dose Vitamin C at the same time, since I’ll be hooked up for 3hours anyway, once a week?

Reply
Mike Sal says last year

Hi David.
I have been diagnosed with Smoldering Myeloma 3 months ago.

2 months ago, I started doing Alternative treatments to prevent Multiple Myeloma.

I did 10 Treatments of Xenon and Krypton treatments to boost blood cells health as well as a good diet with lots of vegetables, soup and lots of white fish fillet and white chicken and fruits and almond, almond milk etc.

I am also eating iron foods including wheat, fish, cracked wheat, spy beans, chick peas, broccoli etc.

After starting the diet and treatment within 4 weeks, my body changed and started removing all toxins.

My liver and kidneys started working hard to remove the toxins.

Integrative doctor gave me anti oxidant supplements and vitamins and other supplements to remove bacteria and help blood flow.
Also, he gave me anti inflammatory supplements.

Somehow I became slightly anemic. My iron levels are normal but ferrin saturation is at 12% one below 13% which is normal.

I also started to have some inflammation and go to toilet and urinate a lot.

I am now taking Iron tablets, Vitamin C Liposomic, curcumin 1000 Mg a day to start with and still doing the diet.

My integrative therapist noticed a 50% improvement in my immune system and my blood cells however the membrane cells are not strong enough still.

I asked him if I should do vitamin C IV Injections at 60 grams at another clinic as he does Not do that treatment.

He advised me that it may or may not work, and it may increase your Paraprotein serum levels and plasma cell count.

3 months ago, my Plasma cells were at 39%. Serum protein at 24 g/l. Now after 2 months treatments and diet, my serum protein went up to 26 g/l.

I spoke to my Haemotologist, he said it goes slightly up and down. It is not an issue.

I have a few very Important questions for u.

1. What do you think the cause of my liver and kidneys weakening and iron deficiency. Is it diet related or system changes related?

2. Does low level iron Ferrin saturation cause serum papaprotein to increase?

3. Is it true that Vitamin C IV Injections at 60 Grams high dose Or higher can make my condition worse and cause Paraprotein levels to go up due to toxicity?

4. If dont have very strong blood cell membranes, can they NOT handle high doses of vitamin C? My understanding is that Vitamin C toxicity can improve the weaker cells too.
What are your thoughts?

Please help.

Thank you

Mike

Reply
Pauline Bicker says last year

I have been told I have 4:14 high risk myeloma. I’d appreciate anything you can tell me I should be doing. I take lots of supplements and plant based diets as well as ‘off label meds’ and just started taking cbd oil too.

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Pauline-

    I am sorry to learn of your MM diagnosis. On the one hand a 4:14 deletion is a common genetic abnormality, on the other hand, it is a genetic abnormality.

    While I consider evidence-based non-conventional therapies like intravenous vitamin C therapy to be an important part of your therapy plan, I encourage you to find and work with a MM specialist. The reason for this is that it is specialists who can recommend those therapies that will do you the most good. The link below is an example.

    4:14- ventoclax

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Elizabeth Meadows says last year

Greetings David! Thank you so very very much for the tremendous amount of information that you provide here. I so wish I had the resources to do MM coaching with you and dearly appreciate your being available to answer questions. I read about the IV Vitamin C therapy for MM and have located a place to be able to do that. I am about 5 weeks in my first cycle of chemo on revlimid and velcade. I started on Dex though had a rough reaction to it and was taken off of it. No Mspike detected nor kidney damage thus far and very grateful. 30% detected with a BMB. I am IGg kappa. I was also informed about oxygen therapy in a hyperberic chamber located at a clinic nearby. Is that something you would recommend as well as the Vitamin C infusion? Thank you so very much for your perspective and taking the time to answer me – Elizabeth Meadows

Reply
Multiple Myeloma Therapy- Thymoquinone - PeopleBeatingCancer says last year

[…] Multiple Myeloma- Intravenous Vitamin C Therapy […]

Reply
Multiple Myeloma Therapy- Meditation, Spirituality - PeopleBeatingCancer says last year

[…] Multiple Myeloma- Intravenous Vitamin C Therapy […]

Reply
Myeloma, Brest Cancer Diagnosis- Both Conventional, Off-label... - PeopleBeatingCancer says last year

[…] or have you been free of MM that long that the treatment wasn’t available? I plan on doing IV vitamin C therapy soon once I have raised more money in my GoFundMe campaign. It’s something I have wanted to do […]

Reply
Myeloma Diagnosis- Stage 1- Non-toxic Therapies Only? - PeopleBeatingCancer says last year

[…] Multiple Myeloma- Intravenous Vitamin C Therapy […]

Reply
Myeloma Coaching- Treating Both Myeloma, Breast Cancer- Conventional, Off-label... - PeopleBeatingCancer says last year

[…] or have you been free of MM that long that the treatment wasn’t available? I plan on doing IV vitamin C therapy soon once I have raised more money in my GoFundMe campaign. It’s something I have wanted to do […]

Reply
Christine Royer says last year

PLEASE remove my last name from what I just posted. I didn’t realize that it would be shared.

Thank you! 🙂

Christine

Reply
Christine Royer says last year

Hi,

First of all, I was grateful to find your site. Thank you for all that you’re doing to help us beat MM and stay in remission. While being treated for breast cancer (advanced), I received the diagnosis of MM the end of August. Treatment for the breast cancer stopped and I started the third round of chemo this week. Yesterday my doctor talked to me about the bloodwork and PET scan last week. The good news is that my body is responding well to the chemo and a couple of the labs were within normal range. He talked with me about considering autologous stem cell therapy after the fourth round. It sounded very intensive and concerning given the breast cancer as well. He will talk with his team to find out if it’s advisable. I am wondering if you did this type of therapy or have you been free of MM that long that the treatment wasn’t available? I plan on doing IV vitamin C therapy soon once I have raised more money in my GoFundMe campaign. It’s something I have wanted to do for quite some time and the new diagnosis makes it even more important.

How long did you do the IV vitamin C? I am also working with a naturopath who specializes in oncology, taking supplements, eating a ketogenic diet, doing oxygen therapy and having a lot of energy work done. Despite the health challenges, I have faith and a lot support.

One more question . . . I learned that green tea interferes with the Velcade. It looks like you recommend drinking green tea so I am curious about that. Also, I recently learned about off label medications for the MM and breast cancer based on the book “How to Starve Cancer” and am considering going down that road although it seems complicated. Do you take any off label medications to stay in remission? Do you take any conventional treatments now? (i.e., Zometa)

Thank you. I look forward to your response.

Reply
Pauline Bicker says a couple of years ago

Diagnosed two months after breast cancer. Current paraprotein 24 no treatment and bones clear (two spots on spine-no change last mri) want to do all I can to lower pp. Currently take off label drugs/supplements and low gi diet

Reply
    David Emerson says a couple of years ago

    Hi Pauline-

    From reading your post my guess is that you are early stage MM or perhaps even pre-MM (SMM). There are a number of evidence-based, non-toxic therapies shown to reduce the risk of MM and perhaps paraprotein. Certainly intravenous vitamin C therapyn is one. Curcumin, (scroll to the bottom of the post to learn of most bioavailable curcumin formulas), green tea, resveratrol, others.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Thymoquinone is both Cytotoxic and Integrative Cervical Cancer Therapy says a couple of years ago

[…] Multiple Myeloma- Intravenous Vitamin C Therapy […]

Reply
Alex Ilic says a couple of years ago

Hi David, I was just recently diagnosed with MM. They stated I was stage 1 low risk. I have a lesion on my clavicle, humorous head, and rib. My BMB showed 50% myeloma cells. I was diagnosed at Rush University in Chicago.. I’ve since switched to UofChicago as they have a clinical trial of Dara/KRd open for newly diagnosed patients. I am scheduled to start treatment June 3rd. However, my numbers have been stable from April to Mays blood work. They don’t want me to delay my treatments. However, I’m thinking of delaying it and getting High Dose Vit C IV for a few weeks and see how my numbers go. What are your thoughts?

Thank you,
Alex Ilic

Reply
    David Emerson says a couple of years ago

    Hi Alex,

    I am sorry to learn of your MM diagnosis. Though, as you know, early or stage 1 MM offers a much longer average survival. Re your question, several things to consider.

    1) 30% of MM in the blood is the official definition of MM- MGUS and SMM are below 30%.

    2) I am skeptical of any/all toxicity. The less toxicity MMers have, the better. After all, we are talking about 10-20 years of survival.

    3) In your case, you are walking a fine line between potential damage done by chemotherapy versus damage done by the MM itself. Stable numbers are good though you mentioned bone involvement. Chemo should knock that MM out. Yes, intravenous vit C might as well though I would also supplement with anti-MM such as curcumin, resveratrol, omega-3, etc.

    4) Another “plus” to undergoing non-toxic therapies such as int. IV vit.C, curcumin, nutrition, is that you will be “pre-habilitating” and should respond better to your chemo when you do begin.

    I guess I am saying not to wait too long to begin conventional therapy but you may be better off in the long run by preparing your body/health/MM before you begin active chemo.

    I’m not sure if I answered your question. Let me know.

    thanks

    David Emerson

    Reply
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Heather Boston says 3 years ago

How much vitamin C do you need to take

Reply
    David Emerson says 3 years ago

    Hi Heather,

    Because you are asking this question on the post about intravenous vitamin C I will assume that you are asking about intravenous vitamin C not oral vitamin C. The dose is based on several issues that must be addressed by the clinic administering the dose.

    David Emerson

    Reply
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Shauna Reisewitz says 3 years ago

HI David,
My 81 year old father was diagnosed with MM in 2004. And it has been smoldering, until recently. Around November- his back started killing him and they discovered a couple small tumors on his spine.
He started radiation but ended up in the hospital with a GI bleed and sepsis. where he stayed for a month. I came across a vitamin C protocol that I somehow convinced the ICU doctor to use when we thought he was going to die. he woke up 12 hours later. I have been convinced the vitamin C helped him, and have been on a vitamin C kick ever since. I haven’t been able to convince his doctor to do a vitamin C protocol to attack his Myeloma, and may parents are somewhat conventional as well. I have read that liposomal Vitamin C is similar to IV vitamin C.
Do you know anything about liposomal vs IV Vitamin C? and I really can’t figure out how much vitamin C to give him. Is it possible to do this orally? He is home now, but has round the clock care takers and cannot walk.

Reply
    David Emerson says 3 years ago

    Hi Shauna-

    Great to read about your dad’s positive experience. According to the study linked below liposomal vitamin C is more absorbable than regular oral vitamin C but not as effective as intravenous vitamin C. As far as I know, this same principle is the same with all forms of oral vs. intravenous vitamins, antioxidants, etc.

    It sounds as though your dad benefits from vitamin c. Look for a clinic that administers the intravenous form and go for it.

    Liposomal vs. intravenous vitamin C

    Good luck,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Kathleen Burroughs says 3 years ago

I am 4+ weeks post melphalan and stem cell transplant. Am doing pretty well except for some nausea and being fickle about what I will eat. I had a 35 g infusion of Vit C the day before the melphalan with my haematologist’s OK. No mucositis, diarrhea, neuropathy at this point. I have asked for Vit C infusions from him to help the healing process but have found no studies except using this in conjunction with chemo/radiation, not to improve healing after the fact. Do you know of any studies? I had the recent infusion at my dentist but can’t get back to him at this point and my haematologist says there is no evidence it helps with healing. I see him tomorrow 12:00 GMT so any help before then would be wonderful. I found you when looking for studies – wish I had earlier!

Reply
    David Emerson says 3 years ago

    Hi Kathleen-

    I take your question “do you know of any studies” to mean do I know of any studies regarding intravenous vitamin c to help with healing? The studied regarding intravenous VC and MM that I know of are focused on the anti-MM action of IVC. Oral vitamin C as well as other antioxidants will help your body heal from your ABMT. But IVC is an excellent anti- MM therapy

    The evidence-based nontoxic therapies outlined in the MM Cancer Coaching guides also are anti-MM and are non-toxic.

    Thanks

    David Emerson

    Reply
Karen says 4 years ago

Husband diagnosed with MM stage 1 – 2 last week. Interested to read your page. Can you let us know more about vitamin c and curcumin benefits to fighting MM as have read these can inhibit some chemo drugs effectiveness? Thank you

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Karen-

    I am sorry to read of your husband’s MM diagnosis. Keep in mind that there is a long and growing list of both conventional (FDA approved) and evidence-based non-conventional MM therapies. Which brings me to your question.

    Both intravenous vitamin C and curcumin have been shown to be cytotoxic to MM. Vitamin C in tablet form may or may not interfere with chemotherapy. The research is mixed.

    Much of your husband’s therapy plan will come down to his stage and symptoms. For example, the presence of bone involvement may force you to undergo more aggressive therapies. Non-toxic therapies are less aggressive but cause less collateral damage aka side effects.

    How old is your husband? How is his health otherwise? Do you know his diagnostic levels of his M-spike or kappa and lambda levels?

    I don’t mean to sound nosey. The more I know the more info I can offer.

    Thanks

    David Emerson

    Reply
Christine says 4 years ago

PLEASE TELL ME HOW MUCH VITAMIN C TO DO DAILY.. I CAN GET VITAMIN C IV THERAPY. WHAT ELSE DO I NEED TO DO.. WAS JUST DIAGNOSED AND VERY SCARED.

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Chrisine-

    I will reply to your question via your email.

    David

    Reply
Donald says 4 years ago

Randomly came across your page. What a blessing having you help others with your program! Keep it up and hope you’re doing well.

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Thanks Donald-

    David

    Reply
Iskra Dulgerska says 4 years ago

Hello David, my uncle is sick of MM since 2014. He was treated with velcade dexamethasone alkeran chemotherapy, but paraproteins are already very high and he is quite weak. Can you offer alternative treatment for the disease. Thank you very much
Regards
Iskra Dulgerska
Bulgaria

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Iskra-

    I am sorry to learn of your uncle’s MM. The key to managing your uncles MM will be to combine conventional therapies such as his induction therapy of Velcade, Dexamethasone and Alkeran (melphalan) with evidence-based complimentary and integrative therapies as well as those therapies that research shows is cytotoxic to MM.

    I am both a MM survivor and MM cancer coach. I will email two PDF’s to you at your yahoo email address. One will be the introduction and one will be the guide regarding integrative therapies. There are 12 different MM Cancer Coaching guides that I produce. These two are two guides to give you an idea of what I do. Let me know if you have any questions.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Cherie Rineker says 4 years ago

Hi, I was dxed in 2012, late stage III, tumors on spine, tons of lesions. 16,000 kappa light chain, 6,000 Bence Jones. Done many treatments, two sct but never off chemo. Today Kappa is in normal and BJ in teens, yet due to 3 relapses my onc suggest I continue with chemo ( currently Kyprolis, dex, Bendestine) I am handling it well, yet my immune system is destroyed. Platelets in20’s, monthly Neulesta shots, otherwise neutropenia etc. I would Love to take a chemo break, and was wondering if at this low rate of MM, vit C, turmeric and other supps and diet, I can keep the MM under control and my body a chance to detox. Please give me your thoughts 🙏🏻

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Cherie-

    I have to say Cherie that I commend your efforts based on the past 4 years struggling with your MM. I am impressed. Regarding your question I have to go on record by saying to things. First I am not a professional of any sort. Second I have to admit that I am biased against toxicity. By this I mean that I think is is necessary for all MMers to manage their amount of chemo. I think that MM dr.s give patients too much toxicity.

    Having made those two admissions I will say yes, you should give your body a vacation. But rather than go all or nothing, consider lowering your dosing of chemo while you add intravenous vitamin c, curcumin, anti-MM foods, etc.

    All of the therapies contained in the MM CC program are both evidence-based to kill MM and non-toxic. These therapies should enhance or support whatever chemo you are on. It is possible that you can continue chemo but in a “low-dose maintenance” dosing fashion.

    I will email you the MM CC introduction via your email address. Let me know if you have any questions.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Jan says 4 years ago

I’m based in Scotland UK and have read your blogs for seven years since diagnosis of MM. I did a lot of self treatment both with supplements and numerous other protocols. I had no conventional treatment till early last year when anaemia required several blood transfusions. Then in May 2016 when excruciating pain forced me to go for Velcade, Dexamethasone and Thalidomide. Had that for five months and blood results were good enough to stop treatment in October. Refused ASCT. My para protein levels are now rising again and I want to find a non conventional way to avoid more chemo. Your info seems to focus on US methods. Have you any info about the UK? Thanks David.

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Jan-

    Thanks for reaching out again. Allow me to jump to what I want you to take away from our exchange. You can manage your MM for longer with a higher quality of life if you pursue toxicity gently. In other words, if I understand it, you are 70. As such aggressive toxicity in the form of an ASCT would probably cause more problems that it solves.

    Now, on to specifics. You appear to have managed your SMM and MM well from ’09 to early ’16. It appears as if your MM caused your anemia, which is common, and eventually some bone damage. Also common.

    You then underwent an effective induction chemo “triplet” of Vel/Dex/Thal. Five months of this therapy put you into remission. When you say your para-protein levels are rising again” can you give me some specific numbers? I don’t mean to be nosey, I am just trying to understand your situation.

    I will email you the introduction to the MM Cancer Coaching Program via your email address. My research and experience is to manage MM with evidence-based, non-toxic therapies and with toxic therapies only when necessary. The MM CC Program addresses my approach.

    Regarding your question about UK versus US therapies, two things. First of all, my knowledge is limited about your NHS. As for non-conventional therapies such as intravenous vitamin C, my guess is that this therapy would be offered somewhere in your area. Do you ever get to London?

    http://www.ivboost.uk/high-dose-intravenous-vitamin-c-therapy/

    As for therapies such as Cannabinoid aka CBD oil, I understand that medical marijuana is illegal in the UK. Therefore you will not have access to this therapy.

    Further, many/most of the evidence-based, non-toxic supplements such as curcumin can be purchased online. The MM CC program includes 16 different supplements to choose from.

    The bottom line is that you should use those therapies discussed in the MM CC program in addition to conventional therapies to manage your MM for years. My role as a MM cancer coach is to address any all questions you may have as they arise.

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
      Jan says 4 years ago

      Thanks David,
      Yes you’re right I am 70. Regarding my para protein figures they were sitting at 7 when I finished the Velcade in October and November but are now at 19. I get a Zometa ( bisphosphonate) drip every four weeks. I take numerous supplements and have restarted curcumin having taken it before when following Margaret’s blog. Have never been clear about how much to take. I also take CBD but again not too sure about dosage. I’d be happy to join your coaching and wondering how much it costs and how to pay you. I can’t seem to get rid of my original comment which follows from this. I’m based in Scotland UK and have read your blogs for seven years since diagnosis of MM. I did a lot of self treatment both with supplements and numerous other protocols. I had no conventional treatment till early last year when anaemia required several blood transfusions. Then in May 2016 when excruciating pain forced me to go for Velcade, Dexamethasone and Thalidomide. Had that for five months and blood results were good enough to stop treatment in October. Refused ASCT. My para protein levels are now rising again and I want to find a non conventional way to avoid more chemo. Your info seems to focus on US methods. Have you any info about the UK? Thanks David.

      Reply
        David Emerson says 4 years ago

        Hi Jan-

        Several things. First of all, I can delete any of your past blogs if you would like me to. I like to refer to people’s post history but it is up to you. Secondly, I’m not sure what you mean by US methods vs. UK methods. Your chemotherapy regimens appear to be similar to ours. The evidence-based, non-conventional therapies can be obtained in either country.

        I believe that paraprotein levels of 19 require a combination of conventional chemotherapies as well as non-toxic, anti-MM supplements, nutrition, lifestyle, bone health and mind-body therapies. Yes, curcumin is an important therapy.

        On that note- I take one capsule, 400 mg, of curcumin daily. My MM is in complete remission and I intend to continue taking a curcumin “maintenance dose” for the rest of my life. Mme.’s with active disease like Margaret take between 2-8 GRAMS (1000 mgs = 1 gram). I would slowly increase your daily dose accordingly.

        As for CBD oil, my understanding is that the ratio of CBD to THC is as important as the dose. Do you know if your CBD oil contains any THC?

        I will email you the link to register for the MM Cancer Coaching Program. Only the Gold level ($199) includes ongoing support. I think it is a good idea for us to continue to communicate with each other.

        Let me know if you have any questions. Thanks.

        David

        Reply
GaryJBentley says 4 years ago

Need a source for IF vitamin C in Miami Beach.

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Gary-

    Several things. First of all, I am sorry to learn of your MM diagnosis. What was your stage at diagnosis? Are you experiencing any symptoms such as bone pain, anemia or kidney damage? Have you are are you considering chemotherapy?

    Secondly, if your MM has relapsed or is refractory, please read about the completed clinic trial for arsenic trioxide and intravenous vitamin C linked below. While this trial has been completed you may benefit from an appointment with the study chair Dr. Kelvin Lee.

    Thirdly, I will link the results of a google search for intravenous vitamin C in Miami, FLA. While I have no personal experience with any of the outlets, I am surprised that there are so many in the area.

    Arsenic Trioxide Plus Vitamin C in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    Investigators
    Study Chair: Kelvin Lee, MD University of Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center
    https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=miiami,+florida,+intravenous+vitamin+c+clinic&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

    David Emerson

    Reply
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