Recently Diagnosed or Relapsed? Stop Looking For a Miracle Cure, and Use Evidence-Based Therapies To Enhance Your Treatment and Prolong Your Remission

Multiple Myeloma an incurable disease, but I have spent the last 25 years in remission using a blend of conventional oncology and evidence-based nutrition, supplementation, and lifestyle therapies from peer-reviewed studies that your oncologist probably hasn't told you about.

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Multiple Myeloma Pre-habilitation- Enhance Efficacy, Minimize Toxicity

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“Since pre-habilitation (for MM) is a topic of growing interest in other clinical areas, the development of an appropriate protocol and the findings…”

You have been diagnosed with multiple myeloma (MM), an incurable blood cancer. Your oncologist is promoting the standard-of-care treatment plan including induction therapy, an autologous stem cell transplant and low -dose mainteance therapy. These standard therapies are highly toxic, cause short, long-term side effects and may keep your MM at bay for only a year or two. What do you do? Pre-habilitation.

Consider pre-habilitation BEFORE you begin any therapies. According to the studies linked and excerpted below, pre-habilitation may enhance the efficacy of your treatments while they reduce the toxicity thereby reducing the potential for side effects.

If you’re reading this post and you’ve already begun or completed your induction therapy, consider pre-habilitation before your ASCT, see the second article linked below.

If you are reading this post and you have completed ALL of your conventional therapies, consider pre-habilitation as it becomes re-habilitation. In other words, anti-MM nutrition, supplementation, frequent, moderate exercise, all will help you heal while you continue to fight your multiple myeloma.

Have you been diagnosed with multiple myeloma? What stage? What symptoms? What is your therapy plan? To learn more about pre-habilitation before you begin conventional therapies scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply ASAP.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


Cancer prehabilitation: an opportunity to decrease treatment-related morbidity, increase cancer treatment options, and improve physical and psychological health outcomes.

“Cancer (MM) prehabilitation, a process on the continuum of care that occurs between the time of cancer diagnosis and the beginning of acute treatment, includes physical and psychological assessments that establish a baseline functional level, identifies impairments, and provides targeted interventions that improve a patient’s health to reduce the incidence and the severity of current and future impairments.

There is a growing body of scientific evidence that supports preparing newly diagnosed cancer patients for and optimizing their health before starting acute treatments. This is the first review of cancer prehabilitation, and the purpose was to describe early studies in the noncancer population and then the historical focus in cancer patients on aerobic conditioning and building strength and stamina through an appropriate exercise regimen…

Trial to Explore Benefits of Exercise Before Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Myeloma Patients

“One of the most common treatments for multiple myeloma is an autologous stem cell transplant, a procedure that transplants a patient’s own blood stem cells after being treated with high doses of chemotherapy. In most cases, however, there are adverse effects associated with this treatment…

“There is clearly of value in exploring treatment options that may lessen the effects of treatment, particularly those with relatively low associated costs such as exercise prehabilitation,” they said.

Since prehabilitation is a topic of growing interest in other clinical areas, the development of an appropriate protocol and the findings of this study can be of interest to doctors considering prehabilitation in other cancer types, the study concluded…”

 

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