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Recently Diagnosed or Relapsed? Stop Looking For a Miracle Cure, and Use Evidence-Based Therapies To Enhance Your Treatment and Prolong Your Remission

Multiple Myeloma an incurable disease, but I have spent the last 25 years in remission using a blend of conventional oncology and evidence-based nutrition, supplementation, and lifestyle therapies from peer-reviewed studies that your oncologist probably hasn't told you about.

Click the orange button to the right to learn more about what you can start doing today.

Multiple Myeloma Specialists- Why?

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Who are Multiple Myeloma Specialists and Why Should I care?

You’ve been diagnosed with incurable cancer. You’re trying to manage your emotions and perhaps the emotions of those closest to you. Going to a hematologist/oncologist seems like the best thing to do, right? Studies show that hematologists/oncologists who specialize in multiple myeloma provide much better overall survival statistics than non-specialists.

While the “Great Eight” MM specialists listed in the link above are extremely knowledgeable about MM and can surely provide you with above average MM care, the article linked and excerpted below may be more applicable to your situation.

In short, the article below estimates that the average hospital sees 6.1 myeloma patients annually. The “high volume” facilities treat 50 or more myeloma patients annually. 

When I was first diagnosed in ’94 I was treated by a general oncologist, a surgeon, a radiation oncologist and finally an oncologist specializing in autologous stem cell transplants. But no multiple myeloma specialist.

The list of FDA approved chemotherapies for multiple myeloma is long and growing. It is in your best interest to know the newest regimens, possible side effects in addition to evidence-based, non-toxic MM therapies.

It never occurred to me that there might be multiple myeloma specialists that might offer a different therapy or therapies. The therapies prescribed for me provided only brief remission. I cannot tell you if finding a different oncologist with different training might have made a difference. But I wish that I had gotten a different kind of second opinion.

To learn more about evidence-based therapies for Multiple Myeloma by watching the video below:

I am both a long-term multiple myeloma survivor and myeloma cancer coach.  To learn more about the Multiple Myeloma Coaching Program, click here.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • Long-term MM survivor,
  • MM Cancer Coach,
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Related Articles:


Treatment at high-volume facilities linked to longer OS in multiple myeloma

“Treatment at higher-volume facilities may result in a lower risk for death in patients with multiple myeloma, according to a study published in Journal of Clinical Oncology…

Hematologist/oncologists are estimated to see an average of only two new and six established patients with multiple myeloma each year…

The researchers identified a median annual facility volume of 6.1 patients per year; only 18 facilities treated 50 or more new patients annually…”

Top Hospitals for 2014

Healthgrades America’s Best Hospitals is based solely on clinical quality outcomes and it rewards excellence over a multi-year time period. This premier distinction provides a measure of confidence for consumers. 

America’s 50 Best Hospitals are the top 1% of hospitals in the nation for providing overall clinical excellence across a broad spectrum of conditions and procedures consistently for a minimum of seven consecutive years.

America’s 100 Best Hospitals are the top 2% of hospitals in the nation for exhibiting clinical excellence for at least four consecutive years.

Best Hospitals 2014-15: Overview and Honor Roll

“Some hospitals are more expert than others in caring for patients with life-threatening or rare conditions. And people facing such health challenges need every bit of help they can get. That’s why U.S. News & World Report has published annual rankings of the nation’s Best Hospitals for the last quarter-century….”

Multiple Myeloma Diagnosis- Work with the Best MM Specialists

“Patients who were treated for Multiple Myeloma at higher-volume facilities had a lower risk of mortality compared with those who were treated at lower-volume facilities.”

According to the ACS, less than 1% of cancer diagnoses in the U.S. annually are for multiple myeloma. Myeloma is a rare cancer. Therefore, relatively few oncologists have much experience with or know much about multiple myeloma.

When I was diagnosed in early 1994 I assumed my hospital was experienced in the type and stage of my cancer. I was wrong. There are more than 100 diffent types of cancer. Each type of cancer may exhibit 3 or 4 different stages. Each stage may exhibit dozens of different symptoms.

It is not a criticism of an oncologist to say that he/she may not be experienced with every type and stage of cancer.

Every newly diagnosed MM patient must work with or at least consult with a MM specialist.

Just like any other sort of expertise, law, academia, food, etc. the more experienced practitioner generally performs better. The articles linked and excerpted below explain:

  1. the importance of the individual MM specialist
  2. the importance of the treatment facility to the MMer
  3. how you may want to think about the person treating your MM

Let me try to bring these ideas down to an individual level. After all, it may be difficult to think about long-term overall survival statistics if you are a newly diagnosed myeloma patient.

First of all, don’t be intimidated by the idea of only eight MM specialists. The title “great eight” was coined years ago when the blogger, Gary Peterson, first began writing about MM specialists. The list of the great eight has grown to over 200 MM specialists spread all over the United States. Gary’s site contains a great deal of valuable information for MMers. I recommend spending time reading myelomasurvival.com.

Along the same lines, cancer centers with experience in treating MM have increased in number over the years as well. For example, when I was considering having my autologous stem cell transplant in 1995, only one local hospital had any bone marrow transplant experience at all. And no local cancer centers had much experience with ASCT for myeloma patients like me.

Most importantly, the newly diagnosed MMer does not need to physically go to see his or her MM specialist in order to learn what they have to say. For example, a top MM specialist named James Berenson consults with MMers over the phone frequently. Dr. Berenson can work with your local oncologist to prescribe those chemotherapy regimens at the frequency and doses that Dr. Berenson thinks are right for you and your stage.

Lastly and most importantly, it is essential for MMers to understand that conventional MM specialists can take you only so far. According to conventional oncology MM is incurable. I have lived in complete remission from my MM since 1999 by living an evidence-based, non-toxic, anti-MM lifestyle. To learn more about my story, click here.

Knowledge is power. To learn more about the full spectrum of options for myeloma treatment, plus evidence-based therapies proven to enhance treatment outcomes and protect your body from side effects please watch the short video below:


Recommended Reading:


Who are the GREAT EIGHT of Multiple Myeloma Specialists?

“Since this post was first published I have gotten a number of comments about specialists who were not selected. I also placed a lot of weight on those who had published or provided exceptional survival rates. I did this because I believe you can not manage that which you do not measure. However, many facilities that do not supply survival statistics use clinical trial results as a surrogate or substitute for actual survival data and treatment guidance.   I also did not allow more than one from each facility.  The most important takeaway for a myeloma patient is to have a myeloma specialist on your team, and you can find a listing of well over 200 if you CLICK HERE

Choosing A Multiple Myeloma Specialist

“Looking back, I now realize that I developed a set of six questions that I eventually used to select my new multiple myeloma specialist.

  1. Is the doctor a Teller or an Asker?
  2. Is the doctor well established?
  3. Does the doctor have ties to the area?
  4. Is the doctor certified in hematology?
  5. Is the doctor covered by your insurance?
  6. How much are you willing to do to get the doctor you want?

Association Between Treatment Facility Volume and Mortality of Patients With Multiple Myeloma

“Purpose- To determine the association between the number of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) treated annually at a treatment facility (volume) and all-cause mortality (outcome)…

“The United States offers the best cancer care in the world. But there is no guarantee that all Americans who need superb cancer care actually receive it. That’s because there are significant differences in cancer care between cancer centers. People treated in one place may not live as long as they would have had they sought treatment elsewhere.

Today, about 85 percent of cancer patients in the US are treated in their local communities. This works out for a lot of them. After all, many people have cancers that are relatively common, with treatments that have become so routine, so standardized, their chance of kicking it is pretty good — no matter where they seek care…

A new study focusing on the medical management of multiple myeloma, the same blood cancer I have, adds to the knowledge base that patients treated by experienced physicians fare better. It compared survival rates among patients with multiple myeloma treated at centers with different numbers of patients with this condition. Compared with centers treating just 10 or fewer patients per year, centers that treated 20, 30, and 40 patients per year had approximately 10 percent, 15 percent, and 20 percent lower overall mortality rates during the study period. This held true even when researchers took into consideration sociodemographic and geographic factors and whether patients had other conditions that could affect their health.

While not particularly surprising, these data are troubling when considered in a larger context of just how rare myeloma is compared to, say, breast cancer or prostate cancer. This year, about 30,000 Americans will learn they have multiple myeloma, a disease for which there is no cure. (That’s less than two percent of the nearly 1.7 million Americans who are expected to be diagnosed with cancer this year.) With 13,000 hematologists and oncologists in practice today, the average one will see only two patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma each year and six living with the disease. Some physicians, of course, will see more, while many others will see fewer…”

 

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76 comments
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Reply
Christine says 5 years ago

Hi David,

My mom (age 63) was diagnosed with cancer two weeks ago. The doctors found cancer cells in the abdomen (belly fat & fluid) and also in her spleen. Her spleen has increased in size and continues to do so. The doctors say surgery is not an option and have referred her to an oncologist who will explain chemo options. The doctors have said that she will probably only live for a few more months. She is currently undergoing testing to try to determine the origin of the cancer and to assess which other organs may be affected. I have no knowledge in this field and would like to know if chemo could help her. What homeopathic treatments would you suggest?

Thank-you,
Chris

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Chris-

    I am sorry to read of you and your mom’s health challenges. A specific diagnosis is necessary in order to determine any therapies for your mom. Therapies including chemo, surgical, homeopathic, supplements, anything. Without knowing what or where a cancer may or may not be, everyone is just shooting in the dark, so to speak.

    What symptoms is your mom experiencing? Abdomen discomfort? Let me know when you know more.

    thanks and hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Sharon says 5 years ago

Hi David,

On August 31, 2015 we were informed by the surgical oncologist who performed my husbands total thyroid removal that he has Hurthle Cell Cancer. The tumor was 3cm at the time of removal and was minimally invasive. The surgeon took a lymph node near the tumor and it was clear. On October 5th my husband started radioactive iodine therapy. The uptake was good. It showed 3 spots and they were all bright with radioactive iodine.

Reading about Hurthle Cell Cancer is frightening. We know that it doesn’t respond well to “traditional” RAI therapy, but that the hope of the nuclear medicine specialist was that the blast of RAI would kill off any Hurthle Cells that may be lurking nearby. They have told us that we have to wait 5-6 months to see if the cancer has metastasized. It feels like a lifetime. I keep pushing my husband to seek a 2nd opinion. He is resistant and content to wait it out.

My question is should we just wait? What if there is something that could determine sooner if the cancer has spread? Do you know of a Hurthle Cell Cancer specialist? It is not a “Popular” thyroid cancer and I am having a hard time finding a physician.

Thank You,

Sharon

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Sharon-
    I am sorry to read of your husband’s Hurthle Cell cancer diagnosis. I will enumerate your question and comments below in order to address your question “should we just wait?” Since you can’t see into the future I try to think through your situation in an effort to determine the risk of various outcomes.

    1) “my husbands total thyroid removal” complete removal of the thyroid followed by RAI is the recommended therapy for Hurthle Cell cancer. There are no other conventional oncological recommended therapies that my research uncovered.

    2) “The tumor was 3cm at the time of removal and was minimally invasive” this is a positive finding

    3) “The uptake was good. It showed 3 spots and they were all bright with radioactive iodine.” As you mentioned, Murthle Cell cancer doesn’t not “respond well” to RAI. The fact that your husband’s MCC did respond is another positive for his prognosis.

    4) “They have told us that we have to wait 5-6 months to see if the cancer has metastasized” I understand that you find waiting to be difficult but there is little else for you to do according to the literature.

    5) “Do you know of a Hurthle Cell Cancer specialist? It is not a “Popular” thyroid cancer and I am having a hard time finding a physician.” Sharon, you are correct. Thyroid cancer is rare and then HCC is rare within a rare cancer. There are simply not enough diagnosed cases for a cancer center or a particular oncologist to develop experience.

    6) “My question is should we just wait? ” The only things I would recommend are general anti-cancer therapies such as an anti-cancer diet, and anti-angiogenic nutrition- angiogenesis is the process that cancer cells multiply through blood vessel growth. By reducing the growth of blood vessels, cancer cell growth is limited.

    Beyond this, my research doesn’t indicate that there is anything else you can do.

    Let me know if you would like to know more about angiogenesis.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Beverley says 5 years ago

My sister has stage 4 colon cancer and now it’s spread to her liver. She in Illinois Chicago near Hoffman. It’s been a year of treatment is there a specialist in the area? Or something that can help with her pain?

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Beverly-

    I am sorry to read of your sister’s colon cancer. If “It’s been a year of treatment” and your sister’s colon cancer has metastasized to her liver you may want to think outside of the “conventional cancer” box. By this I mean that yes, there are many qualified colon cancer specialists in a large city like Chicago as the link below indicates.

    Colon Cancer specialists in Chicago, Ill

    However, as you have already learned, conventional oncologic therapies have not slowed your sister’s cancer. You may want to consider a clinical trial utilizing a therapy that represents a differ therapy than what is offered conventionally.

    If a clinic trial interests you I would be happy to do some research into stage 4 colon cancer trials for you. Please let me know.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Katherine says 5 years ago

Hi,
I need help understanding better and getting additional options for my sister. She was diagnosed with cervical cancer and underwent radiation and chemo at Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, FL. She was able to beat that and things were going well but now it has recurred. The whole family is having a hard time with this at this point especially the children. My daughter is 14 and her son’s are 8 and 3 year old twins and have taken it the hardest. I haven’t asked for details but the basics are 1 year of life or pelvic exenteration which is not very promising for a quality life nor healthy. I might be wrong and definitively confused but I do want to help with options and support. I will take her to the end of the world and fight wit her against whatever obstacles. Can you please provide any feedback that will show us any avenues? She will be going for a second opinion here in Florida where we live but I have also tossed the option of finding help farther. She is the head of her household and fears many things for her children including having them taken away by the fathers who have never spent time nor supported them. Her surgery was scheduled for this Thanksgiving week and has now been pushed to Dec. 15th. We are running out of time to make a decision. I will support her no matter what her choice is. This whole ordeal just started this past summer and has moved too fast, she was given this last news on Nov. 16th.

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Katherine-

    I am sorry to read of your sister’s cancer. I can provide research and information for you to consider but I need more specifics about your sister’s health condition.

    A pelvic exenteration is a radical surgery and as you point out, life after this procedure is limited.

    1) What stage of cervical cancer was she originally diagnosed with? Cervical cancer, yes, put what stage? When was her original diagnosis and how long has she been in remission before she relapsed? How many lymph nodes are involved with her relapse.

    2) How old is your sister? What is her health like in general?

    You and your sister will try to balance the risk versus reward for many therapies. Right now you two are only thinking about aggressive surgery or doing nothing. There are therapies that may provide a middle ground-

    If you give me more information I can provide more research (free) and give you more options.

    Let me know and hang in there.

    David Emerson

    Reply
      Katherine says 5 years ago

      My sister is 29yrs. old. She was first diagnosed April-May 2015 with Stage 2B and began receiving chemo & radiation. By early Aug. she was done with treatment and back to work with everything clear. She kept going back to her follow up visits and there were good signs, until now Nov 2015 when we have been given this diagnosis. I am not sure what the actual Stage is now but as mentioned in my previous comment those are the options. As for the lymph nodes affected I’m not sure, some of her paperwork says…”no hypermetabolic groin or pelvic lymph nodes”

      Reply
        David Emerson says 5 years ago

        Hi Katherine-

        Thank you for filling in some of the blanks. Your sister is young, her stage at diagnosis was not especially advanced and from what you say about her lymph node involvement, your sister’s cancer has advanced but not dramatically.

        I am not a medical doctor so you must take what I say knowing that there is much about your sister’s case that I don’t know. From my perspective a pelvic exenteration is radically aggressive therapy. The reason why your oncologist is offering this therapy is that this is the only plan that conventional oncology can offer that will 1) remove as much cancer as possible and 2) is FDA approved.

        Research indicates that the chemo and radiation regimen that you sister underwent last April/May was something like what I’ve posted below. The question now is what, if any, are other possible therapies. The therapy in general that I discuss below is an “integrative” approach. Antioxidant supplement in combination with chemo to kill your sister’s cancer, ENHANCE the chemo and reduce the toxicity of the chemo.

        My guess is that your sister’s oncologist would agree that more radiation isn’t an option. It didn’t work the first time so I won’t work now. As for chemotherapy, while your sister has endured a lot of toxicity and won’t want to undergo any more, the cancer has spread and therefore she must endure those therapies that will stop the spread of the cancer.

        According to the studies linked and excerpted below, curcumin, green tea, grape seed and resveritrol all inhibit angiogenesis and curcumin and omega 3 fatty acids specifically reverse cisplatin resistance. I supplement with curcumin, resveritrol, quercitin, green tea extract, and omega 3 fatty acids (fish oil) but at much lower doses that what you sister may take along with her chemo.

        Reversal of resistance towards cisplatin by curcumin in cervical cancer cells.
        ” Cisplatin resistance in SiHaR due to over-expression of MRP1 and Pgp1 was overcome by curcumin. Curcumin also sensitized both the cervical cancer cells towards cisplatin induced cell killing…”

        Omega 3 fatty acids

        Targeting angiogenesis with integrative cancer therapies.

        “The following herbs are traditionally used for anticancer treatment and are antiangiogenic through multiple interdependent processes that include effects on gene expression, signal processing, and enzyme activities: Artemisia annua (Chinese wormwood), Viscum album (European mistletoe), Curcuma longa (turmeric), Scutellaria baicalensis (Chinese skullcap), resveratrol and proanthocyanidin (grape seed extract), Magnolia officinalis (Chinese magnolia tree), Camellia sinensis (green tea), Ginkgo biloba, quercetin, Poria cocos, Zingiber officinale (ginger), Panax ginseng, Rabdosia rubescens (rabdosia), and Chinese destagnation herbs.”

        Treatment recommendations for advanced stage disease
        Stage IIB, IIIA, IIIB, and IVA:

        Traditionally, advanced disease includes stages IIB-IVA; however, many oncologists now also include patients with IB2 and IIA2 in the advanced disease category[10]
        Treatment recommendations for advanced disease include concomitant chemoradiation and brachytherapy[10, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29]
        Cisplatin 40 mg/m2 IV once weekly (not to exceed 70 mg/wk) plus radiation therapy 1.8-2 Gy per fraction (minimum 4 cycles; maximum 6 cycles) or
        Cisplatin 50-75 mg/m2 IV on day 1 plus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) 1000 mg/m2 continuous IV infusion on days 2-5 and Days 30-33 (total dose 4000 mg/m2 each course)
        Cisplatin 50-75 mg/m2 IV on day 1 plus 5-FU 1000 mg/m2 continuous IV infusion over 24 h on days 1-4 (total dose 4000 mg/m2 each cycle) every 3wk for a total of 3-4 cycles

        This is a long email. Let me know if you have questions.

        Hang in there,

        David Emerson

        Reply
Cure Your Cancer- "If I knew then what I know now. says 5 years ago

[…] Do You Need a Specialist- I was diagnosed with a blood cancer so I needed to work with a hematologist/oncologist. Some oncs specialize in different cancers, some in surgery, radiation, etc. […]

Reply
VONE says 5 years ago

Looking for a Cancer Specialist in LAS VEGAS to talk about CALCIFICATION CANCER IN THE BREAST.

Reply
Terry says 6 years ago

Just diagnosed with testicular cancer, looking for a top oncologist In the Davenport Iowa region

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Terry-

    I am sorry to read of your testicular cancer diagnosis. However I will say that testicular cancer is one of the few cancers that is actually curable depending on your stage.

    Regarding your question “looking for a top oncologist In the Davenport Iowa region” I will list those oncologists in the Davenport, Iowa area that are the most highly rated and most experienced. I encourage you to get a second opinion to get an idea of how each Onc. treats cancers and how you simply feel about him or her. You need to be comfortable talking with, asking questions of and trusting your oncologist.

    These names are in no particular order-

    David W Mercer MD
    Oncologist
    1351 W Central Park Ave
    Davenport, IA 52804
    (563) 421-1960

    David M Spector MD
    Oncologist
    1351 W Central Park Ave
    Davenport, IA 52804
    (309) 779-4200

    Dr. Stewart C Garneau MD
    Prospect Park
    4362 7th St
    Moline, IL 61265
    309-277-2900
    35 years of experience

    Let me know if you have any questions or if you would like more names. Thank you,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Rebecca says 6 years ago

My brother just had surgery to remove part of his colon. He has cancer which they think has metastasized to his liver. He needs a good oncologist. Can you please help me find someone?

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Rebecca-

    I am sorry to read of your brother’s cancer diagnosis. Yes, I can recommend those cancer hospitals who have both been highly rated and or have the most experience in cancer care.

    Where do you live? Do you have a range in mind? By this I mean would you like to be within a specific distance of the hospital?

    Let me know, thanks

    David Emerson

    Reply
Kevin says 6 years ago

Hi David,
I am 49 years old, non smoker. Happily married with 3 children. I was coughing for over 3 months, went to Methodist Hospital in Arcadia, LA. Finally yesterday I was diagnosed with Lung Cancer, stage 4.
Here is the finding: mass lesion and consolidation in the right middle lobe with extension to the right hilum, there are bilateral subcentimeter pulmonary nodules in the lung bases. Subcentimeter low-density lesion in the left hepatic lobe probably represent a cyst.
We are in shock and don’t know what to do, but one thing I know is I will fight this cancer with all my strength, and thankfully my family is totally behind me.
I want to ask for your advise on what would be the best hospital and best combo treatments for my situation. I have made appointment with City of Hope for next week. Also, what’s your opinion on Proton Treatment.
Tks

Kevin

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Kevin-
    I am sorry to read of your lung cancer diagnosis. Yes, getting a cancer diagnosis is difficult. Particularly if you are young (49 is young for a cancer patient).

    Your question about finding the best hospitals and treatments is a sort of good news, bad news thing. Since lung cancer is one of the most prevalent cancer diagnoses in the U.S. annually there is lots of experience out there. Most of the top cancer hospitals have experience with lung cancer. Each of the top cancer centers linked below will offer therapies that they use and have the most experience with, meaning if you go to one of the most experienced centers then you follow their recommendations. My guess is that your situation will require a combination of conventional therapies such as surgery, chemo and radiation. If you choose to meet with someone then you should expect them to convince you that they are the best. Be picky…it is your life.

    The bad news is that the top places will cost a lot of money. Just flying around the country talking to experts will cost a lot of time and money. If you live in Louisiana then perhaps Houston is the closest to you. As conventional oncology goes, MDAnderson is one of the best.

    Unfortunately, conventional stage 4 lung cancer therapies are not curative. I will be direct. You will need surgery and radiation just to buy yourself time to learn about non-conventional therapies that I will talk about below.

    Therefore I follow (myself as a long term cancer survivor) and believe in taking an integrative approach to your therapy. My cancer, multiple myeloma, is considered “incurable.” I don’t understand how my fellow patients can follow only conventional therapies that will not lead to a cure. But this is an important issue that only you can answer for yourself.

    In other words I will urge you to do everything MDAnderson (or whomever) offers in addition to exercise, nutrition, integrative therapies to whatever chemo you do, spiritual/religion, mind/body techniques, everything.

    PBC does not sell anything. I would send you links to articles and or studies for you to read, consider and then pursue or not. PBC supports cancer patients through evidence-based research and information. My experience is that the “best combo treatments” is a spectrum of evidence-based therapies but again, it is up to you to decide. You know the saying “you can lead a horse to water but you can’t make him drink?” Well, that is my philosophy.

    Many of the “combo therapies” can be learned about and pursued in combination with each other. For example, you can start to “prehabilitate” while you are researching and perhaps visiting conventional cancer centers. You can start to eat more nutritiously, stop smoking/drinking (if you do), perhaps find a lung cancer support group in your area, things like this.

    Once you have settled on a cancer center, local or national, if you are interested in “integrative” nutritional supplementation you need to tell me which conventional chemotherapies you will undergo so I can research those supplements that have been shown to enhance the efficacy while reduce toxicity.

    As an example oxiplatin, curcumin

    Oxiplatin is used for colorectal cancer but the principle is the same. Curcumin is a natural, nutritional supplement.

    Does any of this make sense to you?

    M.D.Anderson

    Dana Farber-

    Johns Hopkins

    Let me know- thanks and take a deep breath…

    David Emerson
    Survivor, Creator, Director PeopleBeatingCancer

    Reply
      Kevin says 6 years ago

      Hi David,
      Tks very much for getting back to me so fast. It’s so comforting to have some body responds and support you, and offer unbiased opinions.
      It’s probably too stretch for me to move around the country to get treatment. For now I am planning to target Southern California area. I heard lots of praise on Proton treatment integrated with other processes. Do you know anything about this.
      I will take your advise and start the prehibilitate process at once.
      Tks, I will keep you updated.
      Kevin

      Reply
Jade says 6 years ago

Will you respond to the blog or to my personal email address?

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Whichever you prefer-

    Reply
Jade says 6 years ago

Hi
I underwent a ultrasound that found a thyroid nodule on my right about 1 cm and and much smaller one on my left. My endocrinologist ordered a biopsy of the right nodule but said the left was too small to biopsy yet. That didn’t make sense to me but I got the biopsy results of the right nodule yesterday. It reads the right nodule is suspicious of papillary carcinoma. The Endocrinologist is recommending surgery but couldn’t tell me what stage or offer any alternative treatment besides surgery. I started research and learned I could benefit from a medical and radiation oncologoist, primary doctor, surgeon, and an endocrinologist multi disciplinary team approach to come up with a treatment plan. My hormone blood work results were fine according to the endocrinologist. She said I could lower my cholesterol but it isn’t alarming. I’m in Philadelphia,Pa. Im not sure what to do next. Next week I will see my medical herb doctor and today I will meet with the ear nose and throat surgeon who my endocrinologist sent me to for swelling in my throat and pain in my ear. I am thinking of reaching get out to the Cancer Treatment Center of America. I am overwhelmed and feeling hopeless. What are your thoughts. I really don’t want to be cut on.

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Jade-

    It may or may not help but most everyone who even thinks about a cancer diagnosis feels “overwhelmed and hopeless.” I did for years. The only thing that made me feel better was education, learning about my cancer, my therapies, etc. I found that it was not knowing that made me feel overwhelmed.

    Therefore, by reaching out to PBC you have taken the first step in learning about your situation and feeling better.

    I’m not saying that I am all knowing, I’m another source of information. I’ll try to break down your questions.

    1) “found a thyroid nodule on my right about 1 cm and and much smaller one on my left.” Both of these are tiny. This is good.

    2) “The Endocrinologist is recommending surgery but couldn’t tell me what stage or offer any alternative treatment besides surgery.” It is difficult for me to offer any solid info without a stage or especially is your biopsy identified metastatic cancer. You cannot determine a therapy plan without knowing what it is that you may or may not have.

    3) “Next week I will see my medical herb doctor ” also good. Find out what this source of info thinks.

    4) “I will meet with the ear nose and throat surgeon who my endocrinologist sent me to for swelling in my throat and pain in my ear” again, good- clarify all health issues to make you understand what is what.

    5) “I am thinking of reaching get out to the Cancer Treatment Center of America” if your insurance covers a second opinion then it is always a good idea to get a second opinion- again, another info source.

    6) “I really don’t want to be cut on.” Any therapy, even surgery entails side effects. The link below is to a post and studies explaining that thyroid cancer is over diagnosed and over treated. Please click the link below and read the post to better understand your situation. Taking a watch and wait approach can be a good choice for you. I will research possible therapies for you and post below.

    Thyroid cancer over-diagnosis and over-treatment- do you care?

    Jade, please read this article- it sounds as though the article is referring to you and your situation.
    papillary thyroid overdx and over tx

    let me know if you have any questions

    David

    Reply
5 + 7 + 5 Cancer Practices That Must Stop - PeopleBeatingCancer says 6 years ago

[…] lists below have been collected by cancer specialists themselves–men and women who spend their adult lives living and breathing cancer and […]

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The Doctor-Patient Relationship - PeopleBeatingCancer says 6 years ago

[…] The role of oncologist in the life of a newly diagnosed cancer patient is important. From the time he/she delivers the news, “you have cancer,” to explaining therapies, side effects, diagnostics, and more, you must rely on your oncologist for accurate, fair, honest information about your health. You must know what to expect, know what not to expect and who else to have on your cancer team. […]

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DONALD BUSH says 6 years ago

my name is Donald Bush and i have stage 1a lung cancer. Ive had 39 radition treatments and the tumer was decerced by 50% but it grow back. Im about to go through 9 more treatments with a high entenceaty beam of radition. The DR told me that if this does not stop it from growing that there is nothing esle he can do for me. I dont beleave this. Can you give me any other ideas

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Donald-
    I am sorry to read of your lung cancer diagnosis. However, yes, there are many other therapies for you to consider. Surgery would be the normal therapy for your stage but since you are not doing this therapy then I will conclude that there is a reason why your onc. is not offering this therapy.

    Next, the two articles linked below talk about cryotherapy or freezing your tumor. Without knowing your specifics I have to conclude that cryotherapy for you is definitely a possibility for you. If your onc. knows nothing about this therapy then no, he/she wouldn’t offer it.

    If you would like to learn more about this therapy, and where oncologists are who practice this therapy, then reply to my email. Thanks and hang in there.

    Cryosurgery for lung cancer

    Treatment of central type lung cancer by combined cryotherapy: experiences of 47 patients.

    David Emerson

    Reply
ron says 6 years ago

I would like to know how to get help for stage 4 colon cancer

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    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Ron-
    I am sorry to learn of your colon cancer diagnosis. I can provide information about both conventional and non-conventional therapies for you to consider. Have you undergone any therapies yet? Are you considering further therapies such as chemo or radiation? If so, which chemos?

    Hang in there-

    David Emerson

    Reply
Abdur Rehman says 6 years ago

hello sir,
i am abdur rehman . i m 33 years oid . i have bladder cancer which was diagnosed 1 year ago.reason of bladder cancer illustrated by doctors is.
(smoking,drinking,family history of cancer,work in chemical place, etc.)
although none of them i had in my life. cystoscopy done every 3rd month but sir problem is that urethral stricture. dr. discharge me with catheter bag in 3 times for 3-4 weeks.it was nightmare for me and deadly worst experiance of my life which i faced during this treatmant. please sir treated me and cooperate with me .thanks

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hello Abdur-

    In order for me to provide research, information for you I need your stage at diagnosis. Further, I do not understand what you are asking. Please let me know.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Melanie says 6 years ago

Hi David,

My mom has been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. The hospital that diagnosed her initially told her that she could possibly have 6 months to live. Then they came back and said that they would like to do a combination of chemo and then Whiple surgery to remove the mass from the head of the pancreas.

This is all new and we don’t really know where to begin. She had jaundice very bad at first but the yellowing is decreasing since the placed drain for the bile. She is not able to eat much and does not have an appetite. We have been informed that nutrients are very important in performing chemo.

Can you provide us with some help on pancreatic cancer, Oncologists in Nashville, Tn, and any additional suggestions or help will be great?

Thanks,
Melanie

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Melanie-

    Sorry for this slow reply. I am sorry to learn of your mom’s pancreatic cancer diagnosis. However, it sounds as though you are moving in the right direction with a recommendation of first attempting to shrink the tumor with chemo in order to be able to then surgically remove (whipple) the mass from the head of the pancreas. I will try to address your questions and concerns below.

    1) Pancreatic cancer’s survival statistics are not hopeful. However it is important for both you and your mom to understand what this means. First, “six months to live” is an average and is misleading if your mom is able to undergo surgery to remove the mass. Second, the overall survival statistics for pancreatic cancer is based on conventional oncology therapies. Meaning, conventional chemo and radiation, if this is your only therapy, is limited. Surgery to reduce tumor burden combined with integrative therapies that I will discuss below, may offer you a different survival picture. I am not offering miracles, I am offering therapies that are “evidence-based” yet not FDA approved and therefore not offered by your onc.

    2) “She is not able to eat much and does not have an appetite. We have been informed that nutrients are very important in performing chemo.” Yes, this is correct. Juicing and smoothies are one of the most effective methods for making is easier for the body to absorb nutrition. I also take and therefore recommend those supplements that are food-based or whole food supplements, NOT synthetic vitamins. More below.

    3) “Can you provide us with some help on pancreatic cancer, Oncologists in Nashville, Tn, and any additional suggestions or help will be great?” It is important to work with an oncologist that 1) you and your mom are comfortable with and 2) works well, communicates well with the surgeon or doctor who recommended chemo to shrink the tumor and then whipple.

    I think the best way for you and your mom to build a team of docs that work well together for you, is to find docs at Vanderbilt- as you can read from the link below, Vanderbilt has expertise in pancreatic cancer as well as a center for Integrative medicine.

    “Osher Center for Integrative Medicine: combining traditional medicine with complementary therapies”


    http://www.vicc.org/cancers/disease.php?name=pancreatic-cancer

    These are the studies that I recommend you read in order to understand those therapies that will work with conventional chemo that your onc recommends to shrink the tumor. The study linked and excerpted below is both current and applicable if I understand your post.

    FOLFIRINOX-Based Neoadjuvant Therapy in Borderline Resectable or Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer: A Meta-Analytical Review of Published Studies.

    “OBJECTIVE: The use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy can enable surgical resection of borderline resectable or unresectable pancreatic cancer (PC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the multiagent 5-fluorouracil + oxaliplatin + irinotecan + leucovorin (FOLFIRINOX) regimen as a neoadjuvant treatment for PC…
    CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis shows that down-staging after neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX-based therapy is noticeable in patients with borderline resectable/unresectable PC, with a total R0 resection rate of 40%…”

    This study is saying that for those cases of pancreatic cancer that underwent chemo BEFORE (neoadjuvant) surgery, a percentage where able to then undergo potentially curative (RO) surgery. No guarantee of a cure but a better therapy plan than simply chemo and radiation.

    The integrative or complementary aspect of my approach is to enhance the chemo regiment above (folfirenox) as well as reduce the toxicity as this chemo regimen is very toxic, and will be hard on your mom. My experience is that toxic chemo regimens can force patients to reduce the therapy while the patient is undergoing the therapy. Therefore, in an effort to give your mom as good a chance on maximizing the effectiveness of the folfirenox regimen I am asking you to consider the integrative therapies linked below.

    Curcumin- a supplement that you can buy online…


    The ‘N-factors’ in pancreatic cancer: functional relevance of NF-κB, NFAT and Nrf2 in pancreatic cancer.

    “Furthermore, the pathways of NF-κB, NFAT and Nrf2 are functional, interacting on several regulatory steps, and, especially, natural compounds such as curcumin interfere with more than one pathway. Thus, targeting these pathways by established inhibitors or new drugs might have great potential to improve the outcome of PDAC patients, most likely in combination with established anticancer drugs…”

    Potential New Pharmacological Agents Derived From Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer.

    “According to studies, among diverse plants and phytochemicals, 12 compounds including apigenin, genistein, quercetin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, benzyl isothiocyanate, sulforaphane, curcumin, thymoquinone, dihydroartemisinin, cucurbitacin B, and perillyl alcohol have beneficial action against pancreatic cancer cells through 4 or more mechanisms. Applying their plausible synergistic effects can be an imperative approach for finding new efficient pharmacological agents in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.”

    Please consider supplements such as resveritrol, green tea extracts, apigenin, genisten, etc. as complementary therapies.

    Melanie, I have thrown a lot of info at you in this email. Please let me know if anything is unclear, if you have any questions.

    Please keep me posted and good luck. Please tell your mom I say hello.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Michelle Lee says 6 years ago

Hi David,

Thank you for your article. Your statement “finding an oncologist with the right training and experience can make all the difference” hit the mark for me.

Do you know who are the top oncologists at the Vancouver Cancer Agency ( in Vancouver, British Columbia) who specialize in small bowel cancer? I had a biopsy in my small bowel last month and a 10 mm mass was found and removed which was diagnosed to be adenacarcinoma. 4 lymph nodes were found and 3 were benign, but a 4th one had adenacarcinoma. I have been told it is not common for this cancer to be found in the small bowel, and that it is more commonly found in the colon. I have been referred to the Vancouver Cancer Agency and want to be proactive in ensuring I have the best oncologist to suit my specific diagnosis. If you could provide me some names, that would be greatly appreciated.

I was originally scheduled for my first appointment with an oncologist at the Cancer Agency on May 6 with a doctor who is the Practice Leader there, and seems to have a lot of experience. However, I requested an earlier appointment and they were able to give me an appointment on Apr 14th BUT with a different oncologist. I’ve googled this doctor and see he’s only been an oncologist since 2009. Although he seems smart (went to Harvard and had research awards) and deals with gastrointestinal cancers, it’s clear his focus is on pancreatic cancer. Can you please advise if I should stick with the original appointment on May 6 with the more experienced oncologist or if I should keep the Apr 14th appointment with the less experienced one? I don’t know if it’s possible to keep the Apr 14th appointment and afterwards, ask to be transferred to the other doctor?

Appreciate your help as soon as possible as I have to make this decision by 8 am Tues, Apr 7th as that’s when I have to confirm which appointment and which oncologist I want to see.

Thank you so much,
Michelle

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Michelle-
    I am sorry to read of your small bowel cancer diagnosis. However you are doing your homework and asking the right questions which tells me that you are doing everything to increase the changes of the best outcome.

    I am sorry to say that I don’t have much experience with Canadian surgical oncs. The American medical system is slowly becoming more transparent but it is difficult to find detailed info about individual surgeons. I can’t find any indicators, any metrics about the VCA.
    However, I can include articles/studies for your consideration that may offer additional methods for you to be proactive.

    The articles discussed in the post linked below talk about 1) prehabilitation and 2) a surgical protocol that is relatively new in American hospitals that also enhances surgical outcomes, reduces risk of infection, etc. In short, preparing for your surgery can greatly enhance your outcome.

    http://www.peoplebeatingcancer.org/cancer-surgery-make-the-most-of-the-most-effective-therapy/

    As for which surgical onc to choose, May 6 Experienced Practice Leader or April 14 Younger, Smart surgeon, I can’t say. Both sound pretty good. I have to say that with the proper prehabilitation and proper surgical protocol, combined with either onc, you will be enhancing your outcomes.

    Lastly, you didn’t say if you were considering chemo after your surgery but the post linked below talks about anti-oxidant supplementation.

    http://www.peoplebeatingcancer.org/blogcolorectal-cancer-supplementation/

    As you discussed, if you can meet with both oncs you may be able to see how your gut feels about each?

    Let me know if you have any questions. Hang in there.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Vladimir says 6 years ago

David, hi, thanks for this opportunity

My Dad diagnosis conclusion: MR low-grade glioma picture of this localization (more likely astrocytoma or glioblastoma). It is advisable to consulting neurosurgeon, radiologist. With the active treatment policy – previous fMRI to map the motor zone of the left hand.

Could you advise the breakthrough treatment and the hospital where it could be provided in the USA?

We have opportunity to put my Dad in Moscow clinic Burdenko, where they will do biopsy and then course of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Also I wrote to Israel onco-clinics, one suggested the same course as in Moscow, in another we were told that it is necessary to do the surgery to remove the tumor.

What could you advice?

Thanks in advance,
Vladimir Shmidt

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Paul says 6 years ago

Sorry David with regards research … Surgery would be a start but I have been advised because the area where the tuma is has little ‘free space’ around the effected area to remove it there may be a chance they will leave some behind and if so then the area would be too sensitive to then use radio and chemo
Hence why they suggest the radio and chemo way of attack … 🙁

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Paul-
    I read about similar restrictions of surgery.
    David

    Reply
Paul says 6 years ago

Thank you so much David for your in depth and positive response
This is all new to me and I am struggling to understand the technical speak in the links provided .. What was the green tea link David ? ..
If you are also stating that the treatment offered is the most effective way forward for my partner then I will reassure her and myself will also be less anxious
Thank you David I hope you are well
Many thanks
Paul
Clare was diagnosed only yesterday and we are waiting on the call to book the starting date for treatment .. Although I want this NOW .. I always think it could spread within weeks 🙁 …

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Paul,
    I understand both how confusion all cancer jargon can be coupled with all the emotions that you and Clare are experiencing. All I can offer is what helped me. The more I learned the better I felt. It’s not really control but I felt I had more control at least of my own decisions.

    Having said that re your comment about the links. In essence, the studies published in Pubmed are what I consider to be “evidence based research.” Not me or anyone just saying stuff on the Internet. And what the studies say is that, for instance, curcumin (capsules that you can buy on Amazon or in your local health food store) acts with cisplatin.

    You must keep in mind that there are side effects (collateral damage) that may result from the toxicity of this chemotherapy. Yes, we all know of someone who lost all their hair when going through chemo. But the kind of collateral damage that I am talking about may be more serious. Things like nerve damage. Peripheral Neuropathy. PN for short.

    Low dose chemo, compared to higher doses, also may reduce toxicity and therefore the severity of damage.

    Many newly diagnosed patients are in a hurry for treatment to begin. Studies show that most cancers have been growing for years before diagnosis. Days or even weeks shouldn’t make much difference. Use the time to learn about different therapies, potential side effects, etc.
    The better shape Clare is in physically and mentally BEFORE chemo and radiation the better she will handle it and heal from it. Daily moderate exercise (brisk walks daily), nutrition, eat lots of fruits and veggies, sleep (see below)

    I should have listed melatonin as a supplement. Again, a supplement that you can buy on Amazon. I take 1 mg tablets once a week. I fall asleep faster and experience a deeper sleep.

    The links for green tea and cisplatin cite tea polyphenols ability to work with cisplatin.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=cisplatin%2C+melatonin

    Hang in there-

    David

    Reply
Paul Sables says 6 years ago

Hi
My fiancée of 38 years old has recently been diagnosed with Stage 2b Cancer of the Cervix … (Minimum Deviation Adeno) Rare type.
She is waiting a call to be booked in for Radiotherapy with low dose Chemo for 5 weeks ..then INTERNAL Radiotherapy and Chemo for two weeks
Is there any specialist out there who ANYBODY can recommend to look at a different possibly more direct approach of treating this ASAP
I AM PLEEING FOR ANY HELP …Please …
Best Regards
Paul

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Paul,

    Several things to consider. The therapy you mention, combining radiation with low-dose cisplatin, is the conventional therapy that has shown the greatest benefit. Further, I will link studies below about supplementation that works integratively with cisplatin.
    If you are asking about a more “direct approach” are you asking about surgical options? Something else? I can provide research if you want me to- I’m not sure what you are asking.
    “Although the positive trials vary somewhat in terms of the stage of disease, dose of radiation, and schedule of cisplatin and radiation, the trials demonstrated significant survival benefit for this combined approach. The risk of death from cervical cancer was decreased by 30% to 50% with the use of concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Based on these results, strong consideration should be given to the incorporation of concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy with radiation therapy in women who require radiation therapy for treatment of cervical cancer.[9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17]”

    Integrative therapies with cisplatin- supplements to both enhance the efficacy of cisplatin while reducing toxicity.

    Cisplatin and curcumin-
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=cisplatin%2C+curcumin%2C+cervical+cancer

    Cisplatin and green tea (EGCG)

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=cisplatin%2C+cervical+cancer%2C+egcg

    As for healing radiation damage, please read the studies linked below about hyperbaric oxygen therapy- HBOT

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=radiation%2C+hyperbaric+oxgen+therapy

    Please let me know if this info is any help or if you are looking for different info.

    hang in there

    David

    Reply
      Fay says 6 years ago

      Diagnosed with cervical cancer stage 4b. In my exhaustive internet searches, I’ve found no doctors who have treated this with any level of success. I don’t know what to do, where to turn, nor what my options are. Any information you could provide would be helpful. I’m also looking for the best doctor in the Los Angeles area to go to for this, if you know of any.

      Reply
        David Emerson says 6 years ago

        Hi Fay,

        I am sorry to learn of your cervical cancer diagnosis. Before I get into specifics I need to explain to you that I was terminal in ’97- conventional oncology’s inability to cure a specific cancer and stage is certainly a challenge but only means that if you follow conventional oncology strictly then your chances are slim…

        Please consider thinking outside the box.

        If you have been diagnosed with cervical cancer stage 4b then you are aware that your cancer has spread. The challenge with conventional oncologists for a late stage cancer diagnosis such as yours is that they will have to follow the “standard-of-care” therapies. In this case the standard of care is not curative.

        If you live in LA then my thinking would be that the largest cancer centers will have the most experience in cervical cancer. Cedars-Sinai, for example will have experience in the multimodal approach you may have to take.

        By multimodal I mean that you may need a combination of surgery, chemo, radiation, etc. to manage your cancer.

        Let me be direct- conventional oncology will not be able to offer therapies that are curative. In that case your choices are

        1) palliation- therapy to control pain-
        2) integrative therapies- there are a number of non-conventional therapies that have evidence-based studies that cite the ability to both enhance the efficacy of certain chemotherapies while reducing toxicity.

        An example would be churchmen and paclitaxel. I don’t know what chemo you may undergo- you have to talk to an inc. to decide on a therapy plan.

        If you would like to learn more about integrative therapies for your treatment than I will need to know what your treatment plan is. Integrative therapies, by and large, are relatively inexpensive and easy to build into your lifestyle.

        What do you think about finding an inc. at Cedars-Sinai, meeting with her/him and then communicating more?

        Let me know what you think. Hang in there.

        David Emerson

        Reply
Karen says 6 years ago

My husband has early stage bladder cancer, so he doesn’t need an oncologist yet. But he still may have to have his bladder removed, and I’ve read that it’s important to find a Dr. who has done the surgery at least 50 times each year. Do you know of any urologists and/or bladder cancer specialists in the Rocky Mountain region? Denver, CO; Salt Lake, UT; Billings, MT; anywhere nearby? I appreciate any help you may have.

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Karen-
    I am sorry to read of your husband’s bladder cancer diagnosis but you are smart to begin thinking through therapies at this stage. Please keep in mind that if your husband’s bladder cancer is early stage there are a number of therapies, both conventional and non, that are potentially curative and not as aggressive as bladder removal.

    While I have no personal experience with the Urology Ctr. of Colorado, I understand they are the most experienced in bladder cancer procedures in the geographic area you inquire about.

    http://www.tucc.com/Bladder-Cancer.60.html

    Again, if your husband’s tumor (s) is/are early stage, please consider transurethral surgery to remove the cancer while leaving the bladder intact.

    “Transurethral Resection of Bladder Tumor (TURBT)
    This surgical procedure is done completely through a scope. It is typically performed as an outpatient procedure, but does require a general or spinal anesthetic. Through the scope, the bladder tumor is ‘scraped’ from the inside of the bladder.”
    In the meantime, please read the studies below and consider supplementation with these non-toxic anti-oxidants. The linked studies cite the anti bladder cancer affect of each supplement. I take all for to manage my own cancer.

    green tea
    ww.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22941057
    Curcumin
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25170806
    Resveritrol-
    ww.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24587049
    milk thistle
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15117815

    Let me know if you have any questions.
    Take it easy,
    David Emerson

    Reply
Monae Givens says 6 years ago

how much do breast cancer specialist make ?

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Monae-

    Do you mean “make” as in annual income? If so I would imagine that annual income varies by city and state. Manhattan BC specialists probably make a lot more than BC specialists practicing in small town, USA.

    David Emerson

    Reply
    Ginger Stuckcmeyer says 5 years ago

    After 28 years “in remission” I have now been diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer. How do I find a doctor whose specialty includes 4th stage breast cancer? I live in the Milwaukee area but would be willing to travel anywhere in the state or even to the Mayo in Rochester Mn.

    Reply
      David Emerson says 5 years ago

      Hi Ginger-

      I am sorry to read that your breast cancer has metastasized. If it’s okay I will break my reply in two. I just want to ask where your BC has metastasized. If not to your bones then please read the studies below.

      Metastatic Breast Cancer and bisphosphonate therapy

      I will reply again with suggestions for experienced BC oncs.

      Hang in there,

      David Emerson

      Reply
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