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Recently Diagnosed or Relapsed? Stop Looking For a Miracle Cure, and Use Evidence-Based Therapies To Enhance Your Treatment and Prolong Your Remission

Multiple Myeloma an incurable disease, but I have spent the last 25 years in remission using a blend of conventional oncology and evidence-based nutrition, supplementation, and lifestyle therapies from peer-reviewed studies that your oncologist probably hasn't told you about.

Click the orange button to the right to learn more about what you can start doing today.

Multiple Myeloma Longest Living Survivors-

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Jim Bond, one of the longest living survivors that I know, is the poster child for conventional MM therapies and I am the poster child for non-conventional MM therapies.

If you’re reading this post I have to believe that you are looking for information about people who have lived with multiple myeloma (MM) for a long time aka long-term multiple myeloma survivors.  I’ll cut to the chase…

I’ve been sharing and lurking in MM forums for since the early 2000’s.

  • The longest living MMers that I know of are both from Cleveland, Ohio.
  • They both underwent autologous stem cell transplants (ASCT) at the same hospital, Univerisity Hospital’s Ireland Cancer Center overseen by the same ASCT oncologist, Dr. Hillard Lazarus.

Jim Bond was first diagnosed with MM in 1992 and I was diagnosed with MM in early 1994.  Jim Bond is the poster child for conventional MM therapies and I am the poster child for non-conventional MM therapies.

Jim Bond has undergone 3 ASCTs and 1 allogeneic stem cell transplant. Jim’s last ASCT was due to a “therapy- related secondary cancer.” Meaning Jim got leukemia because of all the toxic chemo he had undergone for the previous 20-plus years. As far as I know Jim is alive and well living in Shaker Heights, Ohio with his wife and caregiver Kathleen.

Kathleen Bond is a testament to the importance of a strong, knowledgable caregiver.

I had an ASCT in 12/95, reached two remissions, had two relapses and was told “there is nothing more we can do for you.” My onc. told me that in 9/97. I underwent a quack cancer therapy from 11/97-4/99, reached complete remission where I remain today. I live an anti-MM lifesytle through evidence-based, non-toxic MM therapies including MM supplementation, MM nutrition, MM bone health therapies, anti-cancer lifestyle therapies and even evidence-based mind-body therapies.

 

So there you have it. Two MMers who have survived more than 25 plus years in totally different therapy plans. Your oncologist can explain conventional therapies to you.

If you would like to learn more about the evidenced-based, non-toxic, anti-MM program that has kept me in complete remission since 1999, scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


A Life Saved by Second Opinions, Experimental Treatments, and a Touch of Luck

By James Bond

“How long will I live?” I asked my oncologist in Ohio in 1992, when I was 44 and diagnosed with multiple myeloma.

“Three years,” he answered.

Jim & Kathleen Bond with their grandson, James
Jim & Kathleen Bond with their grandson, James

Instead, I enjoyed 10 more years of active living. Then my disease began to overtake me; my kidneys were failing, I was unable to eat solid foods, and I had fevers of 105 degrees.

Having already had three stem cell transplants, I seemed to be out of options. My wife Kathleen and I were advised to seek hospice care.

Although I took solace in having lived long enough to see our sons graduate from college and find good jobs, I was not ready to give up hope. I was familiar with experimental treatments because each of my stem cell transplants had involved a clinical trial.

I remember being nervous signing my first consent form, but I trusted my doctor who assured me my health, not the trial’s success, would remain his top priority. I felt good that my participation could help other cancer patients.

So when Kathleen and I heard about clinical trials for the drug bortezomib, now available as Velcade, we asked my local doctor if I could participate. He replied, “Sorry, Jim, there are no openings.”

We conducted our own search and found Dr. Paul Richardson at Dana-Farber. We traveled to Boston and within two weeks, the experimental drug had saved my life. I returned to Ohio and resumed working full-time, with my local oncologist and Dr. Richardson coordinating my care.

My cancer returned in 2004 and I entered another clinical trial at Dana-Farber — this time, for the drug Revlimid — and achieved another remission. I continued taking Revlimid for seven years.

During this period, life was good. Our sons got married and grandchildren arrived. I retired at my firm’s required age, exercised daily, and became a full-time volunteer in Ohio, educating others with cancer. I began participating in the American Cancer Society’s Pan Ohio Hope Ride in 2007 and rode every year through 2011, cycling 328 miles from Cleveland to Cincinnati in four days.

Kathleen and I have shared our survival story with cancer support groups across the country, focusing on the value of second opinions, clinical trials, exercising, and staying positive.

Last fall, my blood counts began to decline significantly and my local oncologist performed a bone marrow biopsy (my 26th). He said I was at risk for a secondary cancer — leukemia — and I may need another transplant.

Once more, Kathleen and I turned to Dana-Farber for a second opinion. The doctors agreed that my bone marrow was abnormal, but it was not yet time for a transplant. Instead, they advised that my blood be monitored to see if my counts would come up on their own. I slowly began to improve, and by April 2012 my blood counts had fully recovered.

My cancer remains in remission 20 years after my diagnosis. We accept that there is no cure for multiple myeloma — yet — but I continue to live well with this disease, grateful for the clinical trials that saved my life and offered new therapies to many others.

James (Jim) Bond and his wife Kathleen live in Shaker Heights, Ohio.

Leave a Comment:

51 comments
Kris W says 7 days ago

Hi, I hope you are doing well. Thank you for this page. My husband who is 65 has just received a dx of MM. He has no symptoms. Protein showed up in his blood on routine bloodwork. More testing was done then a bone biopsy, 24 hr urine, bone scans, ct and he received a dx of MM and has been scheduled for chemo treatment with Darzalex, Revlimid, Velcade and dexamethasone. This is quite a shock as he is very healthy and active with no pain or signs of illness. This website has been very comforting to me as I can’t stand the thought of losing him. I would be very interested in any information on therapies that we can do to help him. Thank you for your work.

Reply
Kathleen Bungart says last month

Hope. I am originally from Cleveland area. Graduated from Lutheran West Rocky River and BGSU. My father passed away from MM and I (live in Alaska since 1972) was diagnosed in 2015. I wish I could work with Dana Farber, but just too far and too expensive. I recently found Dr Berenson in LA and am totally filled w/hope. Appreciate u sharing ur story.

Reply
    David Emerson says last month

    Hi Kathleen-

    Clearly Clevelanders are long lived myeloma survivors. Jim Bond’s wife is also named Kathleen. To be honest, Dr. Berenson is a better MM specialist in my experience. Don’t get me wrong, I have the utmost respect for Dana-Farber. But they are aggressive where mm is concerned. And Berenson is a master at managing mm with low-dose therapies.

    Let me know if you have any questions. Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Brian Heatherly says a couple of months ago

I have just been diagnosed with Stage 1 MM. I am 53 years old. I feel great and have no symptoms. We just moved to NC from TN to be closer to our grandsons (4 years old and 15 months old). I was establishing a new physician here in NC, and he wanted to do a blood test to check for COVID antibodies because I had been really sick for a week back in June. That is where the doctor found a high level of protein in my blood. What a miracle! My hematologist has even said I can wait to start treatment, but he has referred me to Duke for a 2nd opinion. I am waiting for them to reach out to me to see what my options are. I appreciate this article because it gives me hope. I have a tremendous amount to live for and don’t want to lose that opportunity. Any more information would be greatly appreciated. You are an inspiration! Thanks.

Reply
    David Emerson says a couple of months ago

    Hi Brian-

    I replied to you directly via your email address.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Faisal says a few months ago

Hello David
Thanks so much for this informative blog.
I am 55 male, diogonised with MM in Feb 2022. According to my fish report, I fall into high risk category. My oncologist put me on Revlimid, Velcate and dexamethasone. After 4 cycles, My M spike is lower than 3 and my doctor advised me Revlimid for maintain.

I am interested in alternate therapy for maintenance. Can you please share your experience with alternative therapy?

Appreciate any help.

Thanks again

Reply
Tara says 9 months ago

Hi David,
Thank you so much for sharing your story and for creating this page, you give me hope! I am 44 and was just diagnosed with MM 2 days ago. I am very early stages, so no treatment is required as of yet – unless they find lesions on my bones (yet to get results). I have always been into complementary treatments my whole adult life and I would love to get started on non-convential treatments as early as possible in the hope of staying on top of the progression of this disease. I would be so incredibly grateful for any information you can share about your alternate treatment pathway. Thank you from the bottom of my heart!

Reply
    David Emerson says 9 months ago

    Hi Tara-

    I responded to you via your email address.

    David

    Reply
Ilse Hein says last year

Hi Jim, remember me? I am the Austrian MM patient that was diagnosed same year as you in Illinois, at age 44. Since 2007 no more treatments. My doctors call my MM

stable. Im am still being observed every 3 months for any changes. So far so good!
I hope you do not have to fight another blood cancer. I came down with 2 more cancers

Hi Jim,
Remember me? I am that Austrian MM patient that was diagnosed the same year as you were – in 1992. It has been a long journey,
Hope you will not have to fight a 2nd Blood Cancer! Take care.
Best wishes, Ilse
Best wishes, Ilse
I missed the International Myeloma Workshop in Vienna this September. Did not want to travel to Europe because of Covid-19.

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Ilse-

    Great to see you are alive and stable. PeopleBeatingCancer would be honored if you wrote a bit about yourself, your challenges, treatment-related secondary cancers- whatever you want to write about.

    Thanks,

    David Emerson

    Reply
sandi radomski says last year

My husband is seeing an oncologist tomorrow. He may be diagnosed with Multiple Myeloma since his kappa light chains are too high. I would like more information about the non traditional treatment.
Thank you for any information or places to look.
With love and gratitude,
Sandi

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Sandi-

    I am sorry if your husband is diagnosed with MM. Keep in mind that your husband’s treatment, prognosis, and quality of life going forward depend largely on his stage and diagnostic information at diagnosis. For example, early stage MM (stage 1) is very different from MM stage 2 or 3.

    I will email several guides from the MM CC program- the questions guide, the curcumin guide, etc.

    Does your husband have any bone, kidney or nerve pain or involvement? These three MM symptoms often are the main challenges for the newly diagnosed MM patient.

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Cathy Kumlin says last year

Husband 63 dx 8/21/20 with IgG Lambda MM with AL amyloidosis. Was on CborD for induction went into complete remission and was on maint with dex and Daratumumab. Light chains rising. Recommending echo, bone marrow Bx and PET. looking at Kypolis,dex and Lenalidomide until lesions in mouth resolve then transplant. He doesnt want to do the transplant. Calcium 11.2 and not treatable due to the osteo lesions in mouth. any suggestiins?

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Cathy-

    I have never come across “osteo lesions in mouth.” Echo recommendation indicates that your onc. is concerned about your husband’s heart. My thinking is that your husband’s situation is complicated. I can’t make any recommendations without looking at his diagnostic testing results.

    I wish I could offer more help.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Frank Gunn says last year

My primary care provider just told me I may have MM. I’m experiencing bone pain and loss of appetite. How would I know what stage I’m in? What are my options?

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Frank-

    Your first and most important step is to get a diagnosis of MM. MM diagnostic testing, blood, urine, bone scans, FISH testing, all will dictate your stage and possible therapy plans. For example, stage 1 MM is completely different therapies than stage 3.

    The tests that you want to have performed are

    Serum protein electrophoresis SPEP-
    Complete Blood Count- CBC
    Immunofixation-
    Freelight Chain Assay-
    Imaging studies- MRI, PET or similar

    Based on the results of these tests, your oncologist will be able to tell you your stage and therapy plan.

    David Emerson

    Reply
      Frank Gunn says last year

      Thanks David

      Reply
        David Emerson says last year

        Once you get your test results Frank, let me know-

        David Emerson

        Reply
What Foods Help Multiple Myeloma? - PeopleBeatingCancer says a couple of years ago

[…] Multiple Myeloma Longest Living Survivors- […]

Reply
Lisa D. Holmes says a couple of years ago

My father has survived multiple myeloma for 27 years now. He has been told he is now the longest living patient of this kind of cancer. Hoping for several more years!

Reply
    David Emerson says a couple of years ago

    Hi Lisa-

    A 27 year MM survivor is the longest living survivor that I have ever hear of. I would like to write a blog post about your dad if that’s okay with the two of you.

    Newly diagnosed MM patients are very, very interested in fellow MM survivors who live a long time.

    Any and all information that you can provide about your dad’s diagnosis, stage, symptoms, etc. and his history of therapies, things like that. Any lifestyle therapies, such as diet, nutrition, etc. or if he does NOT do any of these types of therapies. What he has learned over the past 27 years, thoughts, etc.

    I can anonomize the post if you would like me to. Give your dad a “pen name.” Whatever you prefer.

    What do you think?

    Thanks,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Multiple Myeloma Diagnosis- Seniors Face Challenges - PeopleBeatingCancer says 3 years ago

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Reply
Steven Mueller says 3 years ago

I am working on year 22 since diagnosis in April 1997.

Reply
    David Emerson says 3 years ago

    Hi Steven-

    Congrats. I would like to write and post a blog about your MM experiences if possible. MM patients and survivors enjoy/gain hope from long-term MMers like you.

    How old are you?
    What were your symptoms at diagnosis? Bone involvement, kidney, fatigue, etc.
    What therapies did you undergo? Conventioal? Non-conventional?
    Are you currently in remission?

    I don’t mean to sound nosey, I am just trying to understand your experiences in order to write a blog post.

    Let me know, thanks.

    David Emerson

    Reply
    Mike Palumbo says last year

    Did you undergo ASCT in the course of your treatment?
    Any cytogenetic abnormalities?
    I.e. . . 4:14, etc

    Reply
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Reply
Steven Gerontianos says 4 years ago

9 years ago I was diagnosed with mm and two days later I was having kyphoplasty kr on two sections of my spine. When it was all over, I lost three inchs in heght. My blood calcium was 12.4 and my IGg was 3600 at that point. I took the velcade which helped to make the numbers decline. At the same time I began to juice alot too. I had a auoto stem cell transplant after about 2.5yrs. Mm came back after a 1.5yrs. Then went back to velcade. Then tried some truely poisonous and toxic plume and decided that the living on the floor option was not my destiny and drew a line in the sand. I always knew anf felt that orher possibilites existed as I listened to much alternative radio in my life and had been familiarized with this reality. I am greatful to these so many wonderful, educated and creative people! Well, with my numbers predictably on the rise like a pendulemed clock I had nine months befor I would be facing a life ending decision. My plan was to formulat a plan in 6months. It was a very lonely moment because so few people have belief and faith that nature has all the answers after a lifetime of being lied to by a medical, pharmasutical monopoly. And so I began researching till I fell asleep and awakening refreshed to continue. Using many, many things. Had my blood drawn at Stony Brook University Hospital and to everyones relief. I secceeded. Next year will be my tenth with mm and about the last four with no pharmasuticals at all. I am happy, healthy, vibrant, educated and very much alive
In fact, because I eat well, my 57 year old self feels often times like 40.

Reply
Steven Gerontianos says 4 years ago

9 years ago I was diagnosed with mm and two days later I was having kyphoplasty procedure on two sections of my spine. When it was all over, I lost three inchs in heght. My blood calcium was 12.4 and my IGg was 3600 at that point. I took the velcade which helped to make the numbers decline. At the same time I began to juice alot too. I had a auoto stem cell transplant after about 2.5yrs. Mm came back after a 1.5yrs. Then went back to velcade. Then tried some truely poisonous and toxic plume and decided that the living on the floor option was not my destiny and drew a line in the sand. I always knew anf felt that orher possibilites existed as I listened to much alternative radio in my life and had been familiarized with this reality. I am greatful to these so many wonderful, educated and creative people! Well, with my numbers predictably on the rise like a pendulemed clock I had nine months befor I would be facing a life ending decision. My plan was to formulat a plan in 6months. It was a very lonely moment because so few people have belief and faith that nature has all the answers after a lifetime of being lied to by a medical, pharmasutical monopoly. And so I began researching till I fell asleep and awakening refreshed to continue. Using many, many things. Had my blood drawn at Stony Brook University Hospital and to everyones relief. I secceeded. Next year will be my tenth with mm and about the last four with no pharmasuticals at all. I am happy, healthy, vibrant, educated and very much alive
In fact, because I eat well, my 57 year old self feels often times like 40.

Reply
Delay Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Multiple Myeloma- says 4 years ago

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Burzynski, Antineoplastons, Multiple Myeloma and The Burzynski Breakthrough - PeopleBeatingCancer says 4 years ago

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Tove says 4 years ago

I have mm… What is the non toxic program Dave Emerson … I am a believer in natural healing but cannot find info, what did you do?

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Tove-

    I am sorry to learn of your MM diagnosis. The MM Cancer Coaching program you ask about is a combination of conventional (FDA approved) and evidence-based non-conventional MM therapies and issues. I combine both in an effort to educate the newly diagnosed MMer as completely as possible.

    To be more specific, the integrative therapies guide specifies those supplements such as curcumin and resveritrol that studies show enhance chemotherapy regimens such as Revlimid. Or the supplementation guide lists non-toxic supplements that studies show kill MM.

    The point is to provide you with the spectrum of MM info in order for you to make the best descisions for you.

    What stage are you currently? What symptoms, if any?

    David Emerson

    Reply
Mike says 4 years ago

I was diagnosed 4/2016 with a rare for of MM, it is SEPM that is outside the bone. It melted away pretty fast during the 2 months of treatment and had a AST that August. I have’nt had any M-Spikes until 3/18 and now worry about my future. I am 49 now and my Oncologist seams to take a strong interest in my case. I just dont know what my options are beside AST w/ Revelimid after but thinking of clinical trials for the CAR T cell infusion. I really need someone in my shoes to talk to.

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    HI Mike,

    Just to be clear, you are saying that you have relapsed after your MM diagnosis in 4/16, induction therapy and an autologous stem cell transplant over the next two months and then remission from then until last March? And you are wondering what your options are for therapy going forward?

    You have many therapy options going forward depending on your current diagnostics (such as your m-spike) as well as your current health. A second stem cell transplant and CAR-T cell therapy may be options.

    Can you tell me more about your relapse? What is your m-spike currently? Is there any bone involvement? Any extramedulary MM?

    thanks,

    David Emerson

    Reply
yashu says 5 years ago

Hi David,

Thanks for your response. Its helpful.

Reply
yashu says 5 years ago

Hi David,

They have found small lesions in liver and below lungs in myeloma. Can this also be cured in chemo?

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Yashu-

    I understand what you mean when you say “cured” but keep in mind that MM is an incurable blood cancer. To answer your question, yes, your mom’s lesions should go away once she is able to control her MM aka reach remission. You and your mom’s challenge is to make the chemotherapy that your mom undergoes as effective as possible while causing as little damage to your mom as possible. This is why integrative and complementary therapies are so important.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Yashu says 5 years ago

Thanks David for your quick response. Sure will have your suggestions.thank you

Reply
David Emerson says 5 years ago

Hi Yashu-
The average survival rates are averages for all MM patients. My experience is that you mom can exceed those averages by undergoing conventional (FDA) as well as nutritional, supplement, lifestyle etc. therapies as well.

There is no guarantee of course but the fact that you are doing research speaks well for your mom’s overall survival.

Your mom’s hemoglobin is a bit low I think. Active MM cells crowd out red blood cells.

Please go to the top of the page, watch the free webinar and become a MM cancer coaching client. We can work through both conventional and non conventional therapies for your mom.

Thanks

David Emerson

Reply
yashu says 5 years ago

They have found small lesions in liver and below lungs.

Reply
yashu says 5 years ago

Hi David,

Thanks for your response. She doesn’t have any bone pain. Doctor did Bone marrow biopsy and confirmed with MM.
Her Hemoglobin level is 10.6. No KIdney damage as per doctor analysis. Her weight is also becoming normal , before diagnosis it was 53.3 kg now 56.3 kg. Can you tell the survival rate? because in google i saw survival rate for stage 1 is 62months, stage 2 – 44 mmonths. Is there analysis correct?

Thanks,
Yashu

Reply
yashu says 5 years ago

Hi,

My mom is 59years. diagonized with MM on june 22nd 2017. she has been under chemo.its been 5 cycles. she had 10kgs weight loss and severe fever and shivering before diagnosis.

Total protein – 9.6
Albumin – 2.58
M Spike – 2.57
K Light chain – 34.90
L chain – 37.50
B2- Microglobulin – 2870

Can you let me know which stage is it

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Yashu-

    I am sorry to read of your mom’s MM diagnosis. Because MM is a cancer of the white blood cells it is common for people to have fevers, colds, etc. before they are formally diagnosed. Regarding your question about your mom’s stage, let me ask you for a bit more info in order to get a better idea of her situation. I say this because your mom’s blood levels, while a bit high are not really that bad. For example, an m-spike of less than 3 is technically not MM.

    Does your mom have any bone involvement? Is she experiencing any bone pain? Does any of her blood work indicate kidney damage (creatinine), anemia (hemoglobin) or increased calcium?

    Any of these blood levels will indicate additional symptoms which will increase her stage.

    One more thing. Your mom’s rapid weight loss may be an indicator of cachexia. Cachexia will make it difficult to undergo chemo, to remain healthy while she recovers from induction therapy. If your oncologist is talking about an autologous stem cell transplant then cachexia will be a problem.

    David Emerson

    Reply
sam says 5 years ago

His current condition is good (no bone pain, no weakness or anything) and weight loss also covered upto average.

he is doing well and doing his job as well.

Reply
onyeka Awunor says 5 years ago

my mom has MM and i really need someone to talk to about this…. please let me know when you can talk

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Onyeka-

    I am sorry to learn of your mom’s MM diagnosis. However you both should understand that there is a long and growing list of both conventional (FDA approved) and evidence-based, non-conventional therapies for the long-term management of MM.

    There are several steps to take that will make our talk more effective for you and your mom. I don’t mean to sound nosey by asking these questions, I am simply trying to get a handle on your mom’s situation.

    1) What was your mom’s stage at diagnosis? I,II or III? Is your mom experiencing any sort of symptoms such as bone pain, anemia (tired, weak) or kidney damage?

    2) Has your mom undergone any conventional therapies yet? Such as chemo or radiation? Either induction (beginning) or an autologous stem cell transplant? If so, when?

    3) Lastly, how is your mom’s health in general? Any health issues that might effect the MM?

    Let me now and hang in there,

    David Emerson
    MM Survivor
    MM Cancer Coach
    Director PeopleBeatingCancer

    Reply
      Sam says 5 years ago

      Hi David,

      I am new in this page. just want to know something about what will prognosis of MM after treatment. my father (61 Age) has MM and now treatment is going on. initially he had 3 month Chemo cycle every week (total 12 chemo).

      After 3 VCD chemo treatment report show good response. then doctor suggest 3 more month chemo cycle, so far he has done 8 chemo 4 remaining.
      Currently his condition is good (no bone pain, no weakness or anything) and doing well.

      How he can leave his life normal and working. appreciate your suggestion here.

      Thanks in advance.

      Reply
        David Emerson says 5 years ago

        Hi Sam-

        I am sorry to read of your dad’s MM diagnosis. Your dad’s prognosis is based largely on his stage at diagnosis (i,II,III), how well he responds to his therapies (especially his induction CVD therapy) and any genetic abnormalities. An example of a genetic abnormality is gene 4 and 14 deletion. This is somewhat common in MM.

        The qualifications would be, generally,

        1) that your dad is in generally good health otherwise.

        2) that he minimizes toxic therapies as much as possible. Meaning his remissions are long and therefore he undergoes less chemo.

        3) I think differently from conventional oncology but I believe in the importance of nutrition, supplementation, lifestyle, bone health and even evidence-based mind body therapies. I live all the above and each is supported by research.

        When you say “good response” can you be more specific? do you have any blood markers? Do you know your dad’s current M-spike?

        As this article explains there is no relation between remission from induction therapy and overall survival. By this I mean that there may be no survival benefit from the 4 additional rounds of chemo and there will be collateral damage aka side effects.

        Not exactly sure what you are asking when you say “How he can leave his life normal and working. appreciate your suggestion here.” But I think you are asking if he can lead a normal life with MM. If this is correct, the answer is yes with qualifications.

        Do you know your dad’s current m-spike?

        thanks

        David Emerson

        Reply
          Sam says 5 years ago

          Hi David.

          Thanks for your quick response, i appreciate.

          I will explain you my father case history, might be that help here.

          1. August 2016
          He has history with electrolight imbalance with potasium, he used to take suppliment of potasium to cover up.
          he had went to doctor for his regular check up with lossed weight upto 10-15 kg with some body pain (No back pain).
          then doctor did all these test which is below (1 by 1).

          B2 Microglobulin : 4962
          Sr. Protein Electroforesis : M-Spike : 1.64
          Myeloma band detected
          Total protein: 8.3 increased
          MRI of skeletogram : Multifocal areas of altered marrow signal seen in bilateral acetabulum and both half of sacrum. No lytic lesion/soft tissue
          Sr. free light chain :
          -K : 320
          -L : 29.40
          -Ration : 10.88 increased
          Bone Marrow Biopsy : Hypercellular marrow for age 25-30% plasma cells seen with few binucleate forms. No evidence of granuloma / malignancy
          Bone Marroe Aspiration : Plasma cells 3-4%
          IHC : Involved by low volume plasma cell myeloma. CD56 focally +ve

          Doctor suggestion : This is smoldering myeloma, no need start immidiet treatment, he had put on observation for next 3-4 month with some protein tablets and suggest stop all other medicine including electrolight suppliment.

          2. November 2016
          Due to stop supplement his potasium level decreased up to 1 then he had not able to move, then treated with Renal tubular Acedosis.

          After that next test happend which was Serum protein electroforesis and Serum free light chain, reports is below :

          Total protein : 9.29
          Serum albumin : 3.99
          Alpha 1 globulin : 0.37
          Alpha 2 globulin : 0.68
          Beta 1 globulin : 0.39
          Beta 2 globulin : 0.20
          Gamma globulin : 3.67
          Albumin, globulin ratio : 0.75
          M band : Present [2.11 GMS% seen in gamma region]
          Free light chain :
          -K : 133
          -L : 41.90
          -Ration : 3.17 increased

          Doctor suggestion : 3 VCD cycle every week.

          3. March 2017
          Test done after 3 VCD
          1) CBC
          2) Serum creatline
          3) Serum protein electroforesis
          4) Serum free light chain

          Total protein : 6.20
          Albumin : 3.66
          Alpha 1 : 0.22
          Alpha 2 : 0.6
          Beta : 0.48
          Gamma : 1.2
          M band : M band detected or one heavy chain (IgM/IgG/IgA)
          Descrete band detected with one light chain (K/L) – Suggestive of monoclonal gammopathy

          Doctor suggestion : This is good response and suggest 3 more month VCD which is going on.

          There is follow up with doctor in june end with same test reports.

          Reply
          David Emerson says 5 years ago

          Hi Sam-

          Thanks for this info. I would like to make sure I understand his current blood test results. Specifically when you write “M band : M band detected or one heavy chain (IgM/IgG/IgA)
          Descrete band detected with one light chain (K/L) – Suggestive of monoclonal gammopathy”

          Are you saying that his M-spike is less than 3? Your father is in remission? If so, this is good. Your father responded to his induction therapy of Velcade, Cytoxan (cyclophophomide) and dexamethasone.

          I will email your yahoo address the introduction to the MM cancer coaching program that I coach. Please ask me any questions you may have.

          thank you,

          David Emerson

          The test results you provide indicate that

          Reply
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