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Recently Diagnosed or Relapsed? Stop Looking For a Miracle Cure, and Use Evidence-Based Therapies To Enhance Your Treatment and Prolong Your Remission

Multiple Myeloma an incurable disease, but I have spent the last 25 years in remission using a blend of conventional oncology and evidence-based nutrition, supplementation, and lifestyle therapies from peer-reviewed studies that your oncologist probably hasn't told you about.

Click the orange button to the right to learn more about what you can start doing today.

Multiple Myeloma Prognosis- Sixth Worst Survival Rate-

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“”Different types of cancer (CA) can vary wildly in their prognosis. While the stage of CA at diagnosis is most relevant to the survival of an individual patient, the type of CA suggests an overall survival…”

The bad news is that you have been diagnosed with multiple myeloma (MM). The good news is that five-year survival rates quoted below can swing dramatically depending on your stage,  your age, and your general health at diagnosis. Myeloma prognosis is between months and decades depending…

More importantly, MM specialists can provide almost twice the five year survival averages compared to non-MM specialists.

The even better news is that evidence-based non-conventional therapies can increase overall survival (length of life) while reducing side-effects. A good example of an evidence-based non-conventional therapy would be frequent, moderate exercise either during or after active therapy.

I am a multiple myeloma survivor and MM cancer coach. I’ve listed the five year survival rate for multiple myeloma, in the number 6 spot. The tricky aspect of MM is that it is considered to be “incurable” by conventional oncology.

In practice this means that if you are diagnosed with MM, oncology can put your cancer into remission for a few years, on average, but eventually MM becomes unstoppable (MDR) and the MM patient dies. This means that MM has a five-year survival rate of 49%.  Just under half of all MMers die in less than five years.

I am writing this post because I think that five-year survival rates don’t mean much to newly diagnosed MM patients.

I don’t believe in five-year survival rates because about 3-1/2 years after I was diagnosed with MM,  I had exhausted all that conventional oncology had to offer me and I was told that “we can do nothing more for you…” in September of 1997.

I have lived in complete remission from my incurable cancer since April of 1999. I live an evidence-based, non-toxic, anti-MM lifestyle through nutrition, supplementation, lifestyle therapies such as frequent, moderate exercise, MM nutrition, MM supplementation, whole body hyperthermia and others.

Have you been diagnosed with multiple myeloma? Does your myeloma prognosis worry you? What are your symptoms?  Please scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • Multiple Myeloma Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

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List of CA mortality rates in the United States

“Different types of CA can vary wildly in their prognosis. While the stage of cancer at diagnosis is most relevant to the survival of an individual patient, the type of cancer suggests an overall survival rate of the population….”

  1. Pancreatic CA (all types) 8.2%
  2. Hepatic and bile duct CA 17.6%
  3. Lung CA (all types) 18.1% (Mesothelioma 9%)
  4. Gallbladder CA 18.2%
  5. Esophageal CA 19%
  6. Multiple Myeloma 49.6%
 This is not a complete list of CA mortality rates as published by the NCI. These figures are at least five years old and do not reflect recent advances in medicine that have improved the detection and treatments of CA and their outcomes. Again, these are average death rates that should not be assumed to apply to individuals, whose prognoses will vary depending on age, sex, race, general health, swiftness of detection, type of treatment, progression of disease, and complicating factors.

Understanding Cancer Prognosis

“If you have cancer, you may have questions about how serious your cancer is and your chances of survival. The estimate of how the disease will go for you is called prognosis. It can be hard to understand what prognosis means and also hard to talk about, even for doctors…”

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