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Recently Diagnosed or Relapsed? Stop Looking For a Miracle Cure, and Use Evidence-Based Therapies To Enhance Your Treatment and Prolong Your Remission

Multiple Myeloma an incurable disease, but I have spent the last 25 years in remission using a blend of conventional oncology and evidence-based nutrition, supplementation, and lifestyle therapies from peer-reviewed studies that your oncologist probably hasn't told you about.

Click the orange button to the right to learn more about what you can start doing today.

Multiple Myeloma Therapy- Fenbendazole aka The Vet Cure, Vet Medicine-

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“The known toxicity profile and selective activity against myeloma cells provide the rationale for considering nocodazole/fenbendazole as future treatment for multiple myeloma.”

As a long-term multiple myeloma survivor and MM coach I’m often asked about non-conventional (not FDA approved) multiple myeloma therapy. In the case of  Fenbendazole, (the vet cure, vet medicine) several people have recently asked me about the possibility of a therapy given to animals being a multiple myeloma therapy.

No question is more conflicting for me. Despite the fact that my own oncologist told be that “we can do nothing more for you” and I achieved complete remission after 17 months taking an evidence-based, non-toxic, non-conventional multiple myeloma therapy, I have tried to walk the line between conventional MM oncology and evidence-based non-conventional MM oncology ever since the launch of PeopleBeatingCancer in June of 2004.

 

There is no question in my mind that conventional MM oncology with its

  • MM diagnostic testing,
  • MM therapies and
  • MM specialists

are central to the lives of MM patients, survivors and caregivers.

Yet my own history as a long-term multiple myeloma survivor is rife with examples of my own oncologists and M.D.’s placing my health and well-being behind their own priorities and interests.

Most importantly, by it’s own admission, conventional MM oncology cannot cure multiple myeloma. If the patient responds, multiple myeloma therapy, on average, will manage multiple myeloma for 3-5 years.

The average five year survival rate for newly diagnosed MM patients is 49%. Years of short, long-term and late stage side effects costing the MM patient hundreds of thousands of dollars will, on average, result in about five years of survival.

So if a newly diagnosed MM patient, a patient who has recently learned that he/she has an incurable cancer,  sends me an email asking about a medicine usually given to animals to de-worm them, I have to do my darnedest to provide information about that non-conventional MM therapy.

  • Fenbendazole has not been researched an approved by the FDA for treatment of multiple myeloma-
  • Fenbendazole is a therapy for animals- please be extra careful-
  • Please read the studies linked and excerpted below-

The fact is, there are dozens of evidence-based, non-toxic multiple myeloma therapies. Conventional, board certified oncologists are not allowed to prescribe  multiple myeloma therapy that is not approved by the FDA- by law. This is the way medicine works in the United States in 2020.

Have you been diagnosed with multiple myeloma? To learn more about the full spectrum of evidence-based multiple myeloma therapy, both conventional and non-conventional, scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Hang in there,

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


Fenbendazole

Fenbendazole is a broad spectrum benzimidazole anthelmintic used against gastrointestinal parasites including: giardia, roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, the tapeworm genus Taenia (but not effective against Dipylidium caninum, a common dog tapeworm), pinworms, aelurostrongylus, paragonimiasis, strongyles, and strongyloides that can be administered to sheep, cattle, horses, fish, dogs, cats, rabbits, and seals.

Fenbendazole is being investigated for use as a cancer treatment in humans.[1]

Targeting the Microtubular Network as a New Antimyeloma Strategy

“Benzimidazoles, including albendazole, fenbendazole, mebendazole, and nocodazole, have been used as anthelmintics and fungicides on the basis of their antimicrotubule activity (10) and have been reported to elicit promising antitumor effect (11–13)…

Nocodazole alone and in combination with dexamethasone inhibits multiple myeloma tumor growth in vitro and in vivo

To further investigate the effects of nocodazole, we tested nocodazole in combination with other compounds. As shown in Fig. 5A, combination of nocodazole with lenalidomide, dexamethasone, or a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor inhibitor KD5170 (17) resulted in a significant (P < 0.05) inhibition of proliferation compared with either drug alone…

In summary, our studies show that nocodazole targets the multiple myeloma cell and its microenvironment (14). Nocodazole mediates its antimyeloma activity through sequential microtubular network damage and cell-cycle arrest. JNK-mediated Bcl-2 phosphorylation results in multiple myeloma cell apoptosis. Nocodazole overcomes drug resistance, decreases tumor growth, and extends survival in vivo in human xenograft mice model. The known toxicity profile and selective activity against myeloma cells provide the rationale for considering nocodazole as future treatment for multiple myeloma.”

Unexpected Antitumorigenic Effect of Fenbendazole when Combined with Supplementary Vitamins

“This study demonstrated that a combination of supplemented vitamins and fenbendazole in the diet inhibited growth of a human lymphoma cell line in SCID mice, whereas fenbendazole or vitamins alone had no growth inhibitory effect…

Our study showed that fenbendazole alone did not significantly affect growth of the P493-6 human lymphoma cell line in SCID mice. Most importantly, our observation that fenbendazole in combination with supplemented vitamins significantly inhibited tumor growth has implications for its use during antitumor studies because it may cause unpredictable interactions with test substances and thus alter research results…”

Antiparasitic mebendazole shows survival benefit in 2 preclinical models of glioblastoma multiforme

“Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive brain cancer, and despite treatment advances, patient prognosis remains poor. During routine animal studies, we serendipitously observed that fenbendazole, a benzimidazole antihelminthic used to treat pinworm infection, inhibited brain tumor engraftment…

In summary, MBZ offers a highly promising opportunity for clinical application on GBM. This is because it has a long track record of safety, there is evidence of preclinical efficacy, an anti-cancer mechanism has been revealed, cost is relatively low, the drug widely available as a generic drug, there is good CNS penetration, and there is a great need for better GBM therapy…”

 

 

Leave a Comment:

36 comments
Nikki says 7 days ago

Hi David,
My husband has been diagnosed with MGUS. Could you sent me the unconventional treatment info for Multiple Myeloma. Hopefully we can get a jump start and stop this before it progresses.
Thank you for sharing this info, much appreciated.

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 days ago

    Hi Nikki-

    I replied to you directly via email.

    David

    Reply
Eric says last week

My mom has MM. She’s done bone marrow transplant. She went into a short remission, but her MM is back. She cannot take revlimid. It gives her horrific allergic reactions. Can you please email me a non-conventional therapies guide ?

Reply
    David Emerson says 7 days ago

    hi Eric-

    I replied to you via your email address.

    David Emerson

    Reply
David says 3 weeks ago

Hi David,
I have been diagnosed with MM last year and had stem cell transplant in Feb
I would like to know more about the non-conventional therapies, can you please email me.

Reply
    David Emerson says 3 weeks ago

    Hi David-

    I sent you the MM CC non-conventional therapies guide via email.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Dr Dennis Tim Crowe, Jr says last month

From you experience what do you know about using Fenbendazole in animals and people with multiple myeloma? I am encouraged by the information you provided. Are you a RRMM on Fenbendazole?

Reply
    David Emerson says last month

    HI Dennis-

    The challenge faced by MM patients and survivors when considering off-label drug use for their MM is the lack of research about that drug (fenbendazole) and MM. The drug may or may not produce results and it may or may not cause side effects.

    Sorry I can’t be more help.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Laila henri says last month

My mom has MM, can you please email me non conventional therapy.

Reply
Laila henri says last month

My mom has MM, can you please email me non conventional therapy. Thanks

Reply
    David Emerson says last month

    Hi Laila-

    I am sorry to read of your mom’s MM diagnosis. PeopleBeatingCancer offers more information about more than a dozen different types of evidence- based non-conventional therapies. I will send you the nutrition guide to give you an idea of one of the more popular types of non-conventional therapies.

    What stage was your mom’s MM? How old is she? Is she experiencing any symptoms such as bone pain or nerve pain?

    David Emerson

    Reply
Layla Singh says a few months ago

Id like to know what other vitamins are used with Fenbendazole and dosage for newly early diagnosed MM patient

Reply
    David Emerson says a few months ago

    Hi Layla-

    As I mentioned in the blog post, little is known about fen ben as a MM therapy. I have no idea what supplements or dose may help with fen ben therapy. I wish I could offer some expertise.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Theodore Englander says 6 months ago

I was diagnosed with multiple myeloma in July 2019 and have been doing the Revlimid and Dexamethasone treatment since then. I am having a hard time with the side-effects. I am interested in learning about non-conventional treatment approaches. Please advise as to how I might get in touch with you to discuss non-conventional therapies. Thank you.

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 months ago

    Hi Ted-

    I am sorry to learn of your side effects of chemo though what you are experiencing is common. I will email you a pdf of the MM CC non-conventional therapies guide to give you a sense of what the MM CC Program is all about. I will include the nutrition guide which also may help you manage your side effects.

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson

    Reply
KAREN BREWER says 7 months ago

Is it ok to take the fenbendazole along with sarclisa, krypolis and dexanethasone treatment?

Reply
    David Emerson says 7 months ago

    Hi Karen-

    Frankly, I do not know if it is okay to take FenBen with conventional regimens.

    Thanks,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Alina garces says 10 months ago

Diagnosed with 80% myeloma and p17delection after transplant and fitting very aggressive myeloma I’m considering fenbendazole but very overwhelmed with all the information appreciated your opinion

Reply
    David Emerson says 10 months ago

    Hi Alina-

    I am sorry to learn of your MM diagnosis. Re your question about Fenbendazole, I have read anecdotal accounts aka personal mentions but no real research, no actual studies regarding Fenben and MM. The personal accounts are mainly that a newly diagnosed MM patient is trying fenben and they will report more later.

    I wish I could provide more information. Let me know if you have any questions.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
michael zaborko says last year

Michael Z
Hi David. I have had MM for 7 years now. All this time was on Revlimid/Dex (no  stem cell transplant) Latest test showed minor disease progression and my oncologist  put me on Daratumumab. I am thinking of supplementing my new treatment with non- conventional therapy you mentioned. Can you advise me?  Thank you for what you are doing.

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Michael,

    7 years on Rev/Dex only is a great progression-free survival. Daratumumab is a logical next step. If I advise you we would discuss additional possible next steps.

    Continue pursuing your low-dose chemo therapy plan with chemo regimens such as bortezomib (proteasome inhibitors) combined with integrative therapies.

    Also, consider other complementary therapies shown to be anti-MM- a number of non-conventional therapies have been shown to cause MM apoptosis.

    To be clear Michael, my approach to managing MM is to combine low-dose conventional chemotherapies with evidence-based non-conventional therapies. If you would like to learn more about this approach, let me know.

    Thanks and hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
      michael zaborko says last year

      Thanks David.
      Yes I would like to learn about non-conventional therapies.
      I will appriciate if you navigate me.
      zaborko@gmail.com

      Reply
Tammy swindell says last year

My mom has mm and I would like to know how to get nocodazole and how much should she take.

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Tammy-

    I know little about nocodazole and its effect on MM. Also, I don’t know how to get it or dosing info. I wish I could offer more
    info.

    Thanks,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Mark says last year

I have agressive Multiple Myeloma and recently been told I also have Amyloid proteins in the heart. Due to this, I was told it greatly reduces my life span. Will fenbendazole help with the MM and the amyloidosis?

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Mark-

    I am sorry to read of your MM diagnosis. The answer to your question is that no one really knows. Fenbendazole has not been studied as a MM therapy. I know of a couple of anecdotal reports but nothing about amyloidosis.

    I am sorry I can’t give you more information. Let me know if you have any questions.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Libby Robb says last year

I was diagnosed with MM end February 2020. Please guide me with regards using Panacur (Fenbendazole) in conjunction with traditional MM treatment.

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Libby-

    I am sorry to learn of your MM diagnosis. While I encourage your attempts to think outside the box, I have to admit that I know little about Fenbendazole as a MM therapy. I am able to guide you through many evidence-based, non-conventional therapies such as anti-mm nutrition, supplementation, and lifestyle therapies but not Fenbendazole.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Reba says last year

My husband was diagnosed in July, 2019 with stage 1 MM. He had 3 spinal tumors and was 80% paralyzed because of vertebral collapse impinging upon the spinal cord. He was given radiation, then began Darzalex, and zometa infusions , dexamethasone and revlamid. He is now on maintenance therapy with the Darzalex monthly, zometa quarterly, revlamid 3 weeks out of 4 and dexamethasone with the monthly Darzalex. He had spine surgery Dec, 2019 from T2 to T 12. Spinal cord was decompressed and he now walks with a cane. Now my question. Would fenbenazole be an option for him at some point? He is on morphine and norco for pain, mainly around the shoulder blade and rib areas.

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Reba-

    I will reply directly to you via your email address. Thanks.

    David Emerson

    Reply
S Razen says last year

On daratumumab and doing good. Can fenben get rid of Multiple myeloma?
Amish friends recommend it as a cure

Reply
Jamie says last year

Hi David – I started Fenben about a month ago. I take it 3 days a week. Tonight I heard Chris Wark strongly caution people against it. He said it has been known to initially be effective, but then the body figures out a way around it – which can cause premature death. Of course he was not referring specifically to MM. Have you heard that? And what is the difference between Fenben and Mebendazole? Thanks so much!

Reply
Lucia says last year

I am undergoing maintenance therapy (kypriolis, revlimid) diagnosed 2017 no transplant . I’m on my second round of treatment . Previously CyborD.

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Lucia-

    Do you have a question?

    David Emerson

    Reply
Laraine Abbey-Katzev says a couple of years ago

I learned of fenbendazole and mebendazole some time ago and my research of it confirmed it is extremely safe, an effective NON-toxic treatment option, and inexpensive to boot! . If I ever developed cancer I would absolutely use this along with GcMAF in any treatment protocol.

Reply
    David Emerson says a couple of years ago

    Hi Laranine-

    Thanks for the support. Several cancer patients have asked me about this therapy.

    David Emerson

    Reply
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