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Recently Diagnosed or Relapsed? Stop Looking For a Miracle Cure, and Use Evidence-Based Therapies To Enhance Your Treatment and Prolong Your Remission

Multiple Myeloma an incurable disease, but I have spent the last 25 years in remission using a blend of conventional oncology and evidence-based nutrition, supplementation, and lifestyle therapies from peer-reviewed studies that your oncologist probably hasn't told you about.

Click the orange button to the right to learn more about what you can start doing today.

Myeloma – Fenbendazole, The Vet Cure

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“The known toxicity profile and selective activity against myeloma cells provide the rationale for considering nocodazole/fenbendazole as future treatment for multiple myeloma.”

As a long-term multiple myeloma survivor and MM coach I’m often asked about non-conventional (not FDA approved) multiple myeloma therapy. In the case of  Fenbendazole, (the vet cure, vet medicine) several people have recently asked me about the possibility of a therapy given to animals being a multiple myeloma therapy.

No question is more conflicting for me. Despite the fact that my own oncologist told be that “we can do nothing more for you” and I achieved complete remission after 17 months taking an evidence-based, non-toxic, non-conventional multiple myeloma therapy, I have tried to walk the line between conventional MM oncology and evidence-based non-conventional MM oncology ever since the launch of PeopleBeatingCancer in June of 2004.

 

There is no question in my mind that conventional MM oncology with its

  • MM diagnostic testing,
  • MM therapies and
  • MM specialists

are central to the lives of MM patients, survivors and caregivers.

Yet my own history as a long-term multiple myeloma survivor is rife with examples of my own oncologists and M.D.’s placing my health and well-being behind their own priorities and interests.

Most importantly, by it’s own admission, conventional MM oncology cannot cure multiple myeloma. If the patient responds, multiple myeloma therapy, on average, will manage multiple myeloma for 5-7 years.

The average five year survival rate for newly diagnosed MM patients is 51%. Years of short, long-term and late stage side effects costing the MM patient hundreds of thousands of dollars will, on average, result in about five years of survival.

So if a newly diagnosed MM patient, a patient who has recently learned that he/she has an incurable cancer,  sends me an email asking about a medicine usually given to animals to de-worm them, I have to do my darnedest to provide information about that non-conventional MM therapy.

  • Fenbendazole has not been researched an approved by the FDA for treatment of multiple myeloma-
  • Fenbendazole is a therapy for animals- please be extra careful-
  • Please read the studies linked and excerpted below-

The fact is, there are dozens of evidence-based, non-toxic multiple myeloma therapies. Conventional, board certified oncologists are not allowed to prescribe  multiple myeloma therapy that is not approved by the FDA- by law. This is the way medicine works in the United States in 2020.

I research and write about alternative therapies for multiple myeloma. I believe this is a component of my job description.

Have you been diagnosed with multiple myeloma? To learn more about the full spectrum of evidence-based multiple myeloma therapy, both conventional and non-conventional, scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Hang in there,

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


Fenbendazole

Fenbendazole is a broad spectrum benzimidazole anthelmintic used against gastrointestinal parasites including: giardia, roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, the tapeworm genus Taenia (but not effective against Dipylidium caninum, a common dog tapeworm), pinworms, aelurostrongylus, paragonimiasis, strongyles, and strongyloides that can be administered to sheep, cattle, horses, fish, dogs, cats, rabbits, and seals.

Fenbendazole is being investigated for use as a cancer treatment in humans.[1]

Targeting the Microtubular Network as a New Antimyeloma Strategy

“Benzimidazoles, including albendazole, fenbendazole, mebendazole, and nocodazole, have been used as anthelmintics and fungicides on the basis of their antimicrotubule activity (10) and have been reported to elicit promising antitumor effect (11–13)…

Nocodazole alone and in combination with dexamethasone inhibits multiple myeloma tumor growth in vitro and in vivo

To further investigate the effects of nocodazole, we tested nocodazole in combination with other compounds. As shown in Fig. 5A, combination of nocodazole with lenalidomide, dexamethasone, or a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor inhibitor KD5170 (17) resulted in a significant (P < 0.05) inhibition of proliferation compared with either drug alone…

In summary, our studies show that nocodazole targets the multiple myeloma cell and its microenvironment (14). Nocodazole mediates its antimyeloma activity through sequential microtubular network damage and cell-cycle arrest. JNK-mediated Bcl-2 phosphorylation results in multiple myeloma cell apoptosis. Nocodazole overcomes drug resistance, decreases tumor growth, and extends survival in vivo in human xenograft mice model. The known toxicity profile and selective activity against myeloma cells provide the rationale for considering nocodazole as future treatment for multiple myeloma.”

Unexpected Antitumorigenic Effect of Fenbendazole when Combined with Supplementary Vitamins

“This study demonstrated that a combination of supplemented vitamins and fenbendazole in the diet inhibited growth of a human lymphoma cell line in SCID mice, whereas fenbendazole or vitamins alone had no growth inhibitory effect…

Our study showed that fenbendazole alone did not significantly affect growth of the P493-6 human lymphoma cell line in SCID mice. Most importantly, our observation that fenbendazole in combination with supplemented vitamins significantly inhibited tumor growth has implications for its use during antitumor studies because it may cause unpredictable interactions with test substances and thus alter research results…”

Antiparasitic mebendazole shows survival benefit in 2 preclinical models of glioblastoma multiforme

“Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive brain cancer, and despite treatment advances, patient prognosis remains poor. During routine animal studies, we serendipitously observed that fenbendazole, a benzimidazole antihelminthic used to treat pinworm infection, inhibited brain tumor engraftment…

In summary, MBZ offers a highly promising opportunity for clinical application on GBM. This is because it has a long track record of safety, there is evidence of preclinical efficacy, an anti-cancer mechanism has been revealed, cost is relatively low, the drug widely available as a generic drug, there is good CNS penetration, and there is a great need for better GBM therapy…”

 

 

Leave a Comment:

91 comments
Natalie says last month

Hello, my 77 yr old father was recently diagnosed with multiple myeloma. His presented a little differently in that he has lytic lesions on his soine and ribs, but no other markers associated typically with multiple myeloma. We are looking on more information on diet. He is a diabetic and watches his carb intake as well as sugar. Could you direct us to recipes or specifically websites for meal ideas. Thank you!

Reply
Luqman says a couple of months ago

Thanks for this article. Can you please advise on the recommended dose to treat myeloma?
Thanks

Reply
    David Emerson says a couple of months ago

    Hi Luqman-

    I have never found a study of Fenben as a therapy for MM. I don’t know what dose would be appropriate. Sorry I can’t be more
    helpful.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Timothy Bradbury says a couple of months ago

Do you have information on non conventional ivermectin therapy?

Reply
    David Emerson says a couple of months ago

    Hi Tim-

    I have not been an able to find research into ivermectin and multiple myeloma.

    Sorry,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Timothy Bradbury says a couple of months ago

Hi risk lambda MM entering 3 rd line of treatment – what’s your protocol with fenben?

Reply
    David Emerson says a couple of months ago

    Hi Tim-

    Though I have experienced, researched and written about many different evidence-based non-conventional therapies, I have not created a fennel protocol.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Michael says a couple of months ago

Low risk smoldering MM. Age 63. Diagnosed over two years ago. Would appreciate your non-conventional protocol you mentioned. Thanks for this and the discussion.

Reply
Carla Willcutt says a few months ago

I was diagnosed with multiple myeloma in October of 2023. Would like to kno more about your approach

Reply
    David Emerson says a few months ago

    Hi Carla-

    I replied to your question via email. Let me know if you have any questions.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Araceli Martínez says a few months ago

Buen día, tengo Mieloma Múltiple Latente de IgA kappa. Podría enviarme información de la terapia alternativa por favor? No he recibido ningún tratamiento por no haber tenido avance de la enfermedad desde hace 3 años que me lo diagnosticaron. Muchas gracias.

Reply
    David Emerson says a few months ago

    Buenos días a ti. Vincularé la guía MM CC a continuación que ofrece la información limitada que solicita. Tenga en cuenta que conozco pocas terapias alternativas, si es que hay alguna, que muestren consistentemente resultados positivos para el MM.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Jen Kelley says 6 months ago

My husband had lymphoma which is under control and not growing due to alternative therapies however at a checkup yesterday his Igg numbers were high and dr says is multiple myeloma-will do bone marrow biopsy after Christmas-I would like to know more about your approach

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 months ago

    Hi Jen-

    I am sorry to learn of your husband’s health challenges. My approach is largely based on your husband’s diagnosis, stage, diagnostic findings. He may need some chemo or local radiation based on his diagnostics, he may need specific nutrition, supplementation to help his kidney function for example. Early stage MM is a different animal from advanced MM.

    Let me know when you know more.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Tara says 6 months ago

My dad was just diagnosed with multiple myeloma. He knows there’s no cure. But can you please help me with a treatment plan for my daddy!?

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 months ago

    Hi Tara-

    I am sorry to learn of your dad’s MM diagnosis. While there is no cure keep in mind that average survival rates are creeping past 10 years. Do you know your dad’s stage at diagnosis? (I,II or III). What are his symptoms? Bone damage? Kidney involvement? Does he have any other health issues beyond MM?

    The more I know about your dad’s health the more therapies I can suggest.

    Let me know- hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
      Tara says 6 months ago

      They haven’t told us his stage yet. They did a bone biopsy Friday. But ct scan showed them all over his bones thru out his body. He had one on his temple that is eating away at the skull and then one behind his jaw where it connects to skull it has already fractured from it. He is anemic, fatigue, and losing his energy.

      Reply
        David Emerson says 6 months ago

        Hi Tara- I am going to guess that your dad is stage 3 MM aka advanced. The main issue in my experience is that your dad must stabilize his health. Your dad will have the greatest chance of success if he works with a MM specialist. This type of oncologist works primarily with MM and will have the most experience with reducing your dad’s bone involvement. Alternative therapies such as fennel may work eventually but they are largely untested and your dad needs aggressive therapies at this point. In order to withstand all of the toxicity your dad will undergo I also encourage diet, lifestyle and complementary therapies. Hang in there, David Emerson

        Reply
          Tara says 6 months ago

          Can you email me some ideas of lifestyle changes and diets and the complementary changes i can help my dad with!?

          Reply
Christiana says 7 months ago

Hi i would like to get to know more about the treatment and which stage is best to take. My mum is in smouldering myeloma. Doctors have been saying that most prob next yr she will start chemo. She is igA kappa. Can you kindly advice further

Reply
    David Emerson says 7 months ago

    Hi Christiana-

    I emailed you directly. If you did not receive my email please check your spam folder.

    thanks,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Kris Ketchum says 7 months ago

Is fenbendazole safe to take with my other prescribed medications? And what dose should I take? and in what form?

Reply
    David Emerson says 7 months ago

    Hi Kris-

    Those are all valid questions. Unfortunately, fenben has not be tested with MM and therefore it is unknown as to other medications, dosing, side effects, etc.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Norina says 8 months ago

Can you help me with a treatment plan to cure my husband to Mieloma Multiple? How to take Fenbendazole, what other supplements? Thank you

Reply
    David Emerson says 8 months ago

    Hi Norina-

    I replied to this question on gmail. If you don’t see an email from me please check your spam folder.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Marion Carwile says 11 months ago

Hello there
My husband was recently diagnosed with MGUS
We are looking into a natural alternative treatment as we do not trust conventional medicine anymore.
Do you think fenben or any of the other “zoles” mentioned above could help my husband?
Thank you so very much❤️

Reply
    David Emerson says 11 months ago

    Hi Marion-

    I am sorry for your husband’s MGUS diagnosis. The challenge with Fenben is the lack of research into whether or not it has any positive effect on MGUS or MM. I just don’t know if it works or will cause side effects.

    Depending on your husband’s risk (low, medium, high) he may not need therapy beyond anti-mm nutrition, supplementation and lifestyle therapies.

    Good luck,

    David Emerson

    Reply
      Marion Carwile says 11 months ago

      Thank you so much for your reply!
      Being that my husband’s numbers are going up with every blood test and his oncologist wants to put him on darzalex I am interested in your non conventional treatment info please!

      Reply
Michelli Kotoski says last year

I’d like to know how to take fenbendazol against cancer. Thank You.

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Michelli-

    I have no idea what doses to take for what types or stages of cancer. Sorry I can’t be more help.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Kevin says last year

Hello David. I enjoyed your article and would appreciate your advice.
After suffering a broken back was diagnosed with MM. After a couple of years of conventional treatment, I am in maintenance but not wanting to do stem cell transplant.
Can you offer a different approach and diet?
Thank you

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Kevin-

    My thinking is that you were stage 2/3 when you were diagnosed with MM. I say this because of your bone involvement. The FDA approved standard-of-care therapy plan for all newly diagnosed MM patients is induction (RVd) followed by an ASCT followed by maintenance therapy.

    It sounds as though you and your onc. did an extended induction (a couple of years…) at which time you then went directly to maintenance therapy.

    The issue you ask about, an ASCT, is not a requirement but a choice on your part. The issue is, in my experience, will an ASCT give you, on average according to research, a longer OS or higher quality of life? Or any benefit really.

    According to research, an ASCT will impart, on average, only a few extra months of PFS aka progression-free survival. This is a slightly longer first remission. Research clearly demonstrates no OS or overall survival benefit.

    I will assume that you are okay staying on low-dose maintenance therapy. In fact, I would argue that you are doing well with only induction and maintenance therapy.

    Or to put is another way, what benefit would you derive from an ASCT? Lots more toxicity, many more short, long-term and late stage side effect. Research clearly shows that a deeper remission does mot mean you will live longer.

    To your question, therapy choices- yes, nutrition, nutritional supplementation (curcumin, omega-3, etc), complementary, lifestyle therapies all have a place in your therapy plan.

    While curcumin and whole body hyperthermia, for example, have been shown to be cytotoxic to MM (kill mm cells), there is no study that cites mm patients living longer on them. There is no research showing a benefit to fenbendazole either.

    My experience is that you will live a longer OS and higher quality of life by combining evidence-based non-conventional therapies with only as much conventional therapies as needed.

    For you this would mean continuing low-dose maintenance until you relapse (this could be years…) and then you can undergo different chemotherapy regimens. If your maintenance is say, 10 mg of revlimid (lenalidomide) you can undergo a proteasome inhibitor or daratumamab.

    If your oncologist tells you that more chemo, an ASCT, may lower your numbers, the issue then becomes what benefit to you will be if you currently have a .5 m-spike and a lot more toxicity lowers it to .2?

    The answer is that research shows no survival benefit and the extra chemo will make you feel miserable.

    The link below goes to the PBC resources center- there is info about MM programs.

    https://peoplebeatingcancer.org/cancer-resources/

    Let me know if you have any questions Kevin.

    Good luck,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Robert Benzing says last year

Would you please email the non-conventional therapy info you have. I am at the point of possibly beginning chemo for my myeloma. I’m hoping I won’t have to put my body through that therapy. Thank you for any information you can provide.

Bob

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Bob-

    I am sorry to read of your possible MM diagnosis. The MM CC non-conventional therapies span anti-mm nutrition, supplementation and lifestyle therapies.

    https://peoplebeatingcancer.org/cancer-resources/

    David Emerson

    Reply
Lesley says last year

Could you send me unconventional treatment I have kidney cancer that’s mets thanks David

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Lesley-

    I am sorry to learn of you kidney cancer diagnosis. Unfortunately I am not knowledgeable about kidney cancer.

    Good luck,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Ann says last year

Hello David. Would you please recommend any non-conventional, evidence-based multiple myeloma therapy? My husband’s case is extremely aggressive. The original Chemo reduced his IgA dramatically, but 2 months after the BMT, his IgA is almost 500. I was about to recommend fenben until I saw this. What other non-conventional stuff therapies should we try.

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Ann-

    I replied to you directly via email.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Jennifer says last year

My fiance was just diagnosed with MM and we have been taking fenben for a couple weeks. Please email the protocol so we can use the information to be as proactive as possible.

We are going to a consult for Immunotherapy in lieu of Chemo.

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Jennifer-

    I am sorry to read of your fiancé’s myeloma diagnosis. I do not have a protocol for fenben. As a therapy that is not FDA approved, I don’t believe that there is a protocol. I encourage you and your fiancé to utilize both conventional MM therapies as well as evidence-based non-conventional therapies.

    Good luck,

    David Emerson

    Reply
S Bell says last year

Hi David! This is a great resource. My mom has light chain MM, diagnosed 7 years ago and has had 2 stem cell transplants and two courses of the oral chemo and Revlamid. Has been untreated for 2 years but is back with metabolically active progression. I don’t think she will fare so well on the chemo again at her age – very eager for your alternative suggestions. Thanks!

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    S Bell-

    Great to see that your mom has been in remission for the past two years. Do you have qny specific questions?

    David Emerson

    Reply
K says last year

My brother was diagnosed with Lambda light chain MM, with numbers reaching 8000. Initially his calcium was 20, which was shocking to numerous medical professionals. He is approaching continued dialysis, and chemo has not helped much to this point. I would like for him to try Joe Tippens protocol, but hus medical dpoa wants to trust Western medical oncologist and nephrologist, although he continues to lose ground, since unexpected diagnosis 3 months ago.
Suggestions, Please.
Thank you.
Kind regards–K/

Reply
Lisa Taylor says last year

Hi. My 75year old dad dad has stage 1 MM. He’s been on a combo of Revlimid, Velcade, Dex, Faspro etc. and it’s all killing him slowly. He has developed chronic asthma, rashes, cysts that needed to be drained. His quality of life stinks. Every time I want to give h8m a supplement (Turmeric, Alpha Glucons, Garlic), I’m told it will interfere with his chemo. At this point, he is ready to try non conventional treatments. Can you please provide me with your suggested plan?

Reply
Claude Parker says last year

I was just diagnosed with MM after a fall where I also fractured my ischium. Do you think the fracture will heal enough so I can walk unassisted? Can you send me more information regarding non-traditional therapy?

Reply
Ann Collins says last year

My husband was diagnosed with MM in 2017. He received a drug called Daratumumab and was in remission by March. we went to MD Anderson in June where he received a stem cell transplant. He was in remission till June of this year and now is back on a treatment every two weeks. Dwayne is 76 years old a retired veterinarian and willing to try anything besides all these chemo drugs. he has been taking fenbendazole for the pass two years. Please if you could let us know if there is anything else he can do. Thank you Ann Collins

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Ann-

    I replied to you via your email address.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
mike says last year

Hi David, my dad was recently diagnosed with mm. Would you please share your suggested non-conventional therapy. Many thanks

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Mike-

    I replied to your post directly via email.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Cliff Schultheis says last year

Hello David . I was diagnosed with mm in June . My numbers on my bone marrow was 22 . I passed the pet scan , cat scan and the bone Graf . I started fenben a month and a half ago . I’m really low on the chart . I will let you know what my numbers do . I’m taking blood tests every month .

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Cliff-

    I am sorry to learn of your MM diagnosis. When you say “my numbers on my bone marrow was 22” I take you to mean that the percentage of mm cells in your bone marrow was 22%? When you say that you passed the pet scan, etc. I take you to mean that you have no bone involvement in your bones.

    And lastly, you began taking Fenben about six weeks ago. Because you are relatively early MM, I am eager to see how you respond to Fenben. Yes, please keep me posted.

    Thanks,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Cherity Sumo says last year

MY DAD WAS DIAGNOSED WITH SMOLDERING MULTIPLE MYELOMA 6 YEARS AGO WE HAVE NOT HAD ANY TREATMENTS THEY SAID HE IS NUMBERS HAVE TO BE AT 50%, I BELIEVE TO BEGIN CHEMO WHAT DO YOU SUGGEST

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Cherity-

    I’m not exactly sure what you are asking however I will send you the MM CC nutrition guide so that your dad can reduce his risk of progression to full MM by including anti-angiogenic nutrition into his diet.

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Nikki says a couple of years ago

Hi David,
My husband has been diagnosed with MGUS. Could you sent me the unconventional treatment info for Multiple Myeloma. Hopefully we can get a jump start and stop this before it progresses.
Thank you for sharing this info, much appreciated.

Reply
    David Emerson says a couple of years ago

    Hi Nikki-

    I replied to you directly via email.

    David

    Reply
Eric says a couple of years ago

My mom has MM. She’s done bone marrow transplant. She went into a short remission, but her MM is back. She cannot take revlimid. It gives her horrific allergic reactions. Can you please email me a non-conventional therapies guide ?

Reply
    David Emerson says a couple of years ago

    hi Eric-

    I replied to you via your email address.

    David Emerson

    Reply
David says a couple of years ago

Hi David,
I have been diagnosed with MM last year and had stem cell transplant in Feb
I would like to know more about the non-conventional therapies, can you please email me.

Reply
    David Emerson says a couple of years ago

    Hi David-

    I sent you the MM CC non-conventional therapies guide via email.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Dr Dennis Tim Crowe, Jr says a couple of years ago

From you experience what do you know about using Fenbendazole in animals and people with multiple myeloma? I am encouraged by the information you provided. Are you a RRMM on Fenbendazole?

Reply
    David Emerson says a couple of years ago

    HI Dennis-

    The challenge faced by MM patients and survivors when considering off-label drug use for their MM is the lack of research about that drug (fenbendazole) and MM. The drug may or may not produce results and it may or may not cause side effects.

    Sorry I can’t be more help.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Laila henri says a couple of years ago

My mom has MM, can you please email me non conventional therapy.

Reply
Laila henri says a couple of years ago

My mom has MM, can you please email me non conventional therapy. Thanks

Reply
    David Emerson says a couple of years ago

    Hi Laila-

    I am sorry to read of your mom’s MM diagnosis. PeopleBeatingCancer offers more information about more than a dozen different types of evidence- based non-conventional therapies. I will send you the nutrition guide to give you an idea of one of the more popular types of non-conventional therapies.

    What stage was your mom’s MM? How old is she? Is she experiencing any symptoms such as bone pain or nerve pain?

    David Emerson

    Reply
Layla Singh says a couple of years ago

Id like to know what other vitamins are used with Fenbendazole and dosage for newly early diagnosed MM patient

Reply
    David Emerson says a couple of years ago

    Hi Layla-

    As I mentioned in the blog post, little is known about fen ben as a MM therapy. I have no idea what supplements or dose may help with fen ben therapy. I wish I could offer some expertise.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Theodore Englander says a couple of years ago

I was diagnosed with multiple myeloma in July 2019 and have been doing the Revlimid and Dexamethasone treatment since then. I am having a hard time with the side-effects. I am interested in learning about non-conventional treatment approaches. Please advise as to how I might get in touch with you to discuss non-conventional therapies. Thank you.

Reply
    David Emerson says a couple of years ago

    Hi Ted-

    I am sorry to learn of your side effects of chemo though what you are experiencing is common. I will email you a pdf of the MM CC non-conventional therapies guide to give you a sense of what the MM CC Program is all about. I will include the nutrition guide which also may help you manage your side effects.

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson

    Reply
      Connie says last year

      David, could you please send me the MM CC non conventional therapies guide and nutritional info also. My husband was diagnosed in July 2022 and has been on traditional Darzalex/dexamethasone/Revlimid and his PET scan is clear and his numbers are good enough to go on maintenance but looking to start Fenben also. His pain is still off the charts and is scheduled for a pain pump implant in a couple weeks as nothing works for his pain. Any other advice for severe debilitating pain from MM? I don’t know if Fenben can help with his pain or not. Connie

      Reply
        David Emerson says last year

        Hi Connie-

        I replied to your post via email. If you did not receive my email, please check your spam folder.

        David Emerson

        Reply
KAREN BREWER says a couple of years ago

Is it ok to take the fenbendazole along with sarclisa, krypolis and dexanethasone treatment?

Reply
    David Emerson says a couple of years ago

    Hi Karen-

    Frankly, I do not know if it is okay to take FenBen with conventional regimens.

    Thanks,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Alina garces says a couple of years ago

Diagnosed with 80% myeloma and p17delection after transplant and fitting very aggressive myeloma I’m considering fenbendazole but very overwhelmed with all the information appreciated your opinion

Reply
    David Emerson says a couple of years ago

    Hi Alina-

    I am sorry to learn of your MM diagnosis. Re your question about Fenbendazole, I have read anecdotal accounts aka personal mentions but no real research, no actual studies regarding Fenben and MM. The personal accounts are mainly that a newly diagnosed MM patient is trying fenben and they will report more later.

    I wish I could provide more information. Let me know if you have any questions.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
michael zaborko says 3 years ago

Michael Z
Hi David. I have had MM for 7 years now. All this time was on Revlimid/Dex (no  stem cell transplant) Latest test showed minor disease progression and my oncologist  put me on Daratumumab. I am thinking of supplementing my new treatment with non- conventional therapy you mentioned. Can you advise me?  Thank you for what you are doing.

Reply
    David Emerson says 3 years ago

    Hi Michael,

    7 years on Rev/Dex only is a great progression-free survival. Daratumumab is a logical next step. If I advise you we would discuss additional possible next steps.

    Continue pursuing your low-dose chemo therapy plan with chemo regimens such as bortezomib (proteasome inhibitors) combined with integrative therapies.

    Also, consider other complementary therapies shown to be anti-MM- a number of non-conventional therapies have been shown to cause MM apoptosis.

    To be clear Michael, my approach to managing MM is to combine low-dose conventional chemotherapies with evidence-based non-conventional therapies. If you would like to learn more about this approach, let me know.

    Thanks and hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
      michael zaborko says 3 years ago

      Thanks David.
      Yes I would like to learn about non-conventional therapies.
      I will appriciate if you navigate me.
      zaborko@gmail.com

      Reply
Tammy swindell says 3 years ago

My mom has mm and I would like to know how to get nocodazole and how much should she take.

Reply
    David Emerson says 3 years ago

    Hi Tammy-

    I know little about nocodazole and its effect on MM. Also, I don’t know how to get it or dosing info. I wish I could offer more
    info.

    Thanks,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Mark says 3 years ago

I have agressive Multiple Myeloma and recently been told I also have Amyloid proteins in the heart. Due to this, I was told it greatly reduces my life span. Will fenbendazole help with the MM and the amyloidosis?

Reply
    David Emerson says 3 years ago

    Hi Mark-

    I am sorry to read of your MM diagnosis. The answer to your question is that no one really knows. Fenbendazole has not been studied as a MM therapy. I know of a couple of anecdotal reports but nothing about amyloidosis.

    I am sorry I can’t give you more information. Let me know if you have any questions.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Libby Robb says 3 years ago

I was diagnosed with MM end February 2020. Please guide me with regards using Panacur (Fenbendazole) in conjunction with traditional MM treatment.

Reply
    David Emerson says 3 years ago

    Hi Libby-

    I am sorry to learn of your MM diagnosis. While I encourage your attempts to think outside the box, I have to admit that I know little about Fenbendazole as a MM therapy. I am able to guide you through many evidence-based, non-conventional therapies such as anti-mm nutrition, supplementation, and lifestyle therapies but not Fenbendazole.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Reba says 3 years ago

My husband was diagnosed in July, 2019 with stage 1 MM. He had 3 spinal tumors and was 80% paralyzed because of vertebral collapse impinging upon the spinal cord. He was given radiation, then began Darzalex, and zometa infusions , dexamethasone and revlamid. He is now on maintenance therapy with the Darzalex monthly, zometa quarterly, revlamid 3 weeks out of 4 and dexamethasone with the monthly Darzalex. He had spine surgery Dec, 2019 from T2 to T 12. Spinal cord was decompressed and he now walks with a cane. Now my question. Would fenbenazole be an option for him at some point? He is on morphine and norco for pain, mainly around the shoulder blade and rib areas.

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    David Emerson says 3 years ago

    Hi Reba-

    I will reply directly to you via your email address. Thanks.

    David Emerson

    Reply
S Razen says 3 years ago

On daratumumab and doing good. Can fenben get rid of Multiple myeloma?
Amish friends recommend it as a cure

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Jamie says 3 years ago

Hi David – I started Fenben about a month ago. I take it 3 days a week. Tonight I heard Chris Wark strongly caution people against it. He said it has been known to initially be effective, but then the body figures out a way around it – which can cause premature death. Of course he was not referring specifically to MM. Have you heard that? And what is the difference between Fenben and Mebendazole? Thanks so much!

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Lucia says 3 years ago

I am undergoing maintenance therapy (kypriolis, revlimid) diagnosed 2017 no transplant . I’m on my second round of treatment . Previously CyborD.

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    David Emerson says 3 years ago

    Hi Lucia-

    Do you have a question?

    David Emerson

    Reply
Laraine Abbey-Katzev says 4 years ago

I learned of fenbendazole and mebendazole some time ago and my research of it confirmed it is extremely safe, an effective NON-toxic treatment option, and inexpensive to boot! . If I ever developed cancer I would absolutely use this along with GcMAF in any treatment protocol.

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    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Laranine-

    Thanks for the support. Several cancer patients have asked me about this therapy.

    David Emerson

    Reply
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