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Recently Diagnosed or Relapsed? Stop Looking For a Miracle Cure, and Use Evidence-Based Therapies To Enhance Your Treatment and Prolong Your Remission

Multiple Myeloma an incurable disease, but I have spent the last 25 years in remission using a blend of conventional oncology and evidence-based nutrition, supplementation, and lifestyle therapies from peer-reviewed studies that your oncologist probably hasn't told you about.

Click the orange button to the right to learn more about what you can start doing today.

Myeloma Therapy- Conventional, Complementary, Integrative –

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Multiple Myeloma Patients and Survivors Must use the Best of Both Conventional (FDA approved) and Evidence-based Non-Conventional Therapies.

You’ve been diagnosed with Multiple Myeloma (MM). Your oncologist has recommended one or more in the long and growing list of conventional cancer therapies (FDA approved) that may include surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. It is my belief however, that MM patients must also incorporate the best of complementary and integrative  myeloma therapies in their therapy plan.

While it is true that a number of multiple myeloma patients are living longer than ever before, according to the American Cancer Society, multiple myeloma is incurable and has an average five-year survival of 49%.

Your first step is to understand the therapies prescribed by your oncologist. Your second step is to understand evidence-based integrative, alternative and complementary therapies that may help you achieve deeper, longer remissions. You will enjoy deeper, longer remissions with few side effects by learning about how evidence-based therapies can work together for you.

First, let me give some basic definitions:

  • Conventional or tradition cancer therapies are what your oncologist will prescribe. FDA approved therapies.
  • Complementary therapies are those therapies that complement or work with your conventional therapies. See the link below but examples of complementary therapy for MM are supplementation (curcumin, omega-3, resveratrol, etc.), exercise, whole body hyperthermia, others).
  • Integrative therapies are those therapies that research has shown to enhance the efficacy of traditional chemotherapy. For example, curcumin enhances Revlimid (lenalidomide).

There is a large and growing body of research demonstrating both integrative and complementary therapies can enhance your conventional therapies, reduce the toxicities of your therapies and therefore lower your risk and severity of side effects. An example of a complementary therapy moderating chemo side effects would be frequent, moderate exercise to reduce peripheral neuropathy.

If you or a loved one have been diagnosed with Multiple Myeloma, let me say this loud and clear:

It is critical that you become an active participant in your care. Learn everything you can.

I am alive today largely because I took the time to find out everything I could about Multiple Myeloma and sought out the full spectrum of evidence-based MM therapies both conventional (FDA approved) and non-conventional.

Your decision-making begins by learning about the full spectrum of evidence-based myeloma therapies, both conventional and non-conventional.  Here are some questions you may have right now:

  • Do Multiple Myeloma specialists know more about MM than regular oncologists? Yes.
  • What side effects should I expect from my induction chemotherapy? Prevention is key.
  • What do I do if I don’t reach complete remission? Don’t panic.
  • What therapies can I use that my oncologist won’t tell me about? Triplets are superior to doublets.
  • Does it matter if I wait to have an autologous stem cell transplant- No. Studies show there is no survival advantage either earlier or later. 

I am both a MM survivor and MM cancer coach. All of these questions are answered in detail in the Multiple Myeloma Cancer Coaching Program. Both the Basic and Premium packages include all 14 guides, plus membership in the Closed Facebook Group, “Beating Myeloma,” a private forum that I moderate for questions and answers among fellow Multiple Myeloma Cancer Coaching members. I hope this information will help you make the best and most informed decisions for your care. It is the information I wish that I had when I was first diagnosed.

I wish you all the best on your Multiple Myeloma journey.

Hang in there,
David Emerson
  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


Conventional therapies-

“Cancer can be treated with surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, immunotherapy, and monoclonal antibody therapy. The choice of therapy depends upon the location and grade of the tumor and the stage of the disease, as well as the general state of the patient (performance status).”

Integrative therapy

Integrative medicine or integrative health is the combination of practices and methods of alternative medicine with evidence-based medicine.[1][2] The term has been popularised by, among others, Deepak Chopra, VA Shiva Ayyadurai, Andrew Weil and Prince Charles.[3][4] Weil says that patients should take the Western medicine prescribed by the doctor, and could significantly benefit from complementary therapies such as omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin D, and herbal remedies, meditation, and other strategies.[citation needed]”

Types of Complementary Therapies

“Some people with cancer may consider using complementary therapy in addition to standard cancer treatment. This approach is called integrative medicine when it has been discussed with and approved by your health care team. Many people use complementary therapies to:

  • Reduce the side effects of cancer treatment
  • Improve their physical and emotional well-being
  • Improve their recovery from cancer

Talk with your health care team before adding any therapies to your standard treatment. They can help you safely combine the therapies that are right for you…”

Alternative therapy

Alternative cancer treatments describes alternative and complementary treatments for cancer that have not been approved by the government agencies responsible for the regulation of therapeutic goods. They include diet and exercise, chemicals, herbs, devices, and manual procedures. The treatments may be untested or unsupported by evidence, either because no proper testing has been conducted, or because testing did not demonstrate statistically significant efficacy. Concerns have been raised about the safety of some of them.”

If your oncologist has prescribed chemotherapy, be sure to ask these questions-

5 Questions to Ask Your Doctor About Chemo

1) Is chemotherapy part of a larger plan to cure cancer, is it designed to delay metastasis, or is it used to treat particular symptoms?

2) What are the side effects of this particular chemo?

3) PICC or port?

4) What if the side effects become intolerable?

5) How do you know whether the chemo is working?

 

Leave a Comment:

88 comments
Florence Auld says 8 months ago

Thank you! Just curious how much of the funds are donated ?

Reply
    David Emerson says 8 months ago

    Hi Florence-

    The Galen Foundation DBA PeopleBeatingCancer is a 501c3 private operating foundation. The IRS designation of “private operating foundation” as opposed to a private foundation such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is that PBC operates or runs its own programs.

    In our case, our program is PeopleBeatingCancer. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, for example, is a private foundation that makes grants aka gives money away to other non-profit organizations. We use the money we raise from donors and from our fee-for-service programs to operate PeopleBeatingCancer.

    David Emerson

    Reply
    David Emerson says 8 months ago

    Hi Florence-

    Having said that, we spend 75% of our revenues on program administration.

    David Emerson

    Reply
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Andrea Duwe says last year

I donor want to do conventional therapy. I am following Sq1 protocol per Cris Wark, completed one round of The incurables program per dr. Schulze, continue a 80/20 raw/cooked diet, have addressed my emotional and spiritual issues, sought counseling to improve my marriage, exercise/sweat vigorously daily, sun bathe, have taken a 4 month sabbatical from work ad nauseam. I would love any input from you. Thank you kindly. Andrea

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Andrea,

    I will assume that you are talking about managing multiple myeloma. From your post, it appears that you are pursuing both nutritional and mind-body therapies. This is great.

    The only other evidence-based, non-toxic therapies to consider would be those nutritional supplements that have been shown to be cytotoxic (aka kill) multiple myeloma. I take curcumin, resveratrol, omega-3, others daily.

    Good luck,

    David Emerson

    Reply
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ken marovich says 3 years ago

I am a member and still do not receive any correspondence from you.

Reply
    David Emerson says 3 years ago

    Hi Ken-

    I’m not sure what you are referring to when you say “correspondence.” You became a member in June of ’16, recieved the MM CC guides and we discussed your MM induction therapy, side effects and your remission at the time.

    What is your current MM status? How are your side effects?

    David Emerson

    Reply
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joe villarreal says 4 years ago

I NEED HELP.

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Joe-

    I am both a long-term cancer survivor and cancer coach. I work with cancer patients to help manage their therapies, side effects, and more. But in order to help you I need more info. Do you have cancer? If so, what type of cancer? What stage? Are you undergoing any therapies? If so, which ones?

    Let me know. Hang in there.

    David Emerson

    Reply
joe villarreal says 4 years ago

hi my name is joe villarreal i have kindey cancer 6 years .took taurusel2 years have not take anything for last 2 years .there not offer any.caner was in remission 18 mouths but last year has been on the move.plant base diet run has been succesful.cancer everwhere.i need to get more focued on diet what to take.i want to take cbd cannabis oil.i need more information on diet.i now have a cough cant get rid of .i need a strategy.501-538-1060.started take b17 500mg twice a day.i need help.

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Joe-

    I will assume that you are the guy who emailed “I Need Help.” What stage is your kidney cancer currently? What state do you live in?

    Let’s work through email communication before we talk on the phone. Thanks.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Multiple Myeloma- Oncologist-Patient Relationship says 4 years ago

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Gene says 4 years ago

Hi David

I just read most of the your post for cancer. I have dealt with bladder cancer for the past 3 years. I have had approx 27 chemo treatments (BCG)in that time. My doctor wants to remove my bladder and prostrate as a result of lingering cancer cells. I refused and he has allowed me to pursue my own thoughts as to what to try next. I am currently taking 4g of curcumin daily and alternating weekly with frankincense, an essential oil. I’m scheduled for a cysto next month and am hoping for a positive outcome. Any thoughts you may have on this effort would be appreciated. Many thanks for your input.

Gene

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    HI Gene-
    I am sorry to learn of your bladder cancer diagnosis. Please tell me the stage of your bladder cancer when you were first diagnosed. Radical cystectomy is not standard therapy for bladder cancer stages 1 or 2. Did you undergo any other therapy for your bladder cancer other than chemotherapy (BCG)?

    Did you receive Transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) before your the chemotherapy?

    Supplementation with curcumin and essential oils is a good step regardless. Let me know. Thanks.

    David Emerson

    Reply
pinku says 5 years ago

Hi david

My dad is 57 and dignosed with lung cancer . he already took 3 chemo and 30 radiation for lung but now the thighh bone is effectedand its too painfull. doc just started chemo for that..can u suggest treatment for him.. he is in india

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Pinku-

    I am sorry to learn of your father’s metastatic lung cancer diagnosis. Metastatic lung cancer is an aggressive diagnosis with a poor prognosis. Any recommendations as to his therapy depends on his:

    1) stage and specific type of lung cancer- either non-small cell lung or small cell lung-

    2) his age and general health status-

    3) what are the names of the chemotherapies he is currently undergoing? Integrative therapies to enhance efficacy is a must-

    Let me know, thanks.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Craig says 5 years ago

Hi David
Several months ago I found out I have stage 3b lung cancer, I just went thru 7 treatments of chemo and 30 treatments of radiation, just had a ct scan and both lymph nodes and the main mass shrunk 50%, the uncologist is doing nothing further just monitoring and another ct scan in 3 months
I was thing on going on cesium chloride, what are your thoughts or is their a better option
Thanks Craig

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Craig-

    I delayed my reply a bit to think about how directly to respond to you. I decided that an email address with “karaoke” in it deserves a direct response.

    While lung cancer staged at 3b is not the worst diagnosis a person can get, it is serious. While I haven’t spoken to your onc. of course my guess is that if he has stopped therapy with a partial remission (50% reduction is good but not complete) then it is fair to conclude that he understands that your lung cancer will grow back and that more chemo will only hurt your quality of life. The issue for you to think about is just how fast will your lung cancer grow back?

    My point is that conventional oncologic therapies offered a little help (50%) but you need to pursue additional therapies. Lung cancer is an aggressive cancer. I would undergo as many non-toxic therapies as my research reveals.

    Based on the pubmed study below, Cesium Chloride is an excellent start.
    Cesium therapy in cancer patients.
    ” The small number of autopsies made showed the absence of cancer cells in most cases and the clinical impression indicates a remarkably successful outcome of treatment.”

    I would take those antioxidant supplements that have been shown by research to be cytotoxic (kill) lung cancer. I would research and include those lifestyle therapies that are anti-cancer.

    Craig, I have been living with an “incurable” cancer since 1999. I believe I have remained in complete remission because of my living a sort of anti-cancer lifestyle 24/7. I think you should do the same. Keep in mind that everything I do is non-toxic.

    I am both a cancer survivor and cancer coach. If you would like to learn more about my cancer coaching let me know.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
      Craig says 5 years ago

      Dave, I would very much be interested in your coaching,Just to let you know my singing career is over, LOL I thought you should know that the only reason I found out I had cancer is because
      my vocal cord became paralized , I breezed thru the kemo and radiation and my lungs have been totally clear ever since I found out I had cancer, even my DR. said if it was not for the ct scan she would never know I have cancer, I started taking
      wheatgrass the minute I found out I had cancer and I swear it has helped alot and I also started taking apricot seeds
      Thanks Craig

      Reply
        David Emerson says 5 years ago

        Craig-

        Knowing that your lungs are “totally clear” is an excellent place to start. Meaning though your tumor is still present it is mot causing any problems.

        The heart of cancer coaching is a concept called anti-angiogenesis. There are several non-toxic supplements that studies have shown are anti-angiogenic to lung cancer. Other supplements that are cytotoxic to lung cancer as well. But the nutrition and supplementation are anti-angiogenic. Several conventional chemotherapies act on the same principle.

        What chemotherapies did you have?

        In any case, I ask cancer coaching clients to make a one time, fully refundable (if you are not satisfied), tax-deductible donation to become a member o PeopleBeatingCancer (501c3 nonprofit). As a member you have access to those lung cancer studies that form the basis of cancer coaching- anti angiogenic nutrition, supplementation, anti-cancer lifestyle therapies, mind-body therapies. In addition is the ongoing research and communication (monthly) in my ongoing efforts to research and present additional therapies, both conventional (FDA approved) and non-conventional.

        The goal is to completely cure you of your existing lung cancer but since we can agree that this will take a long time, the first priority is to stop the cancer from growing back.

        Let me know if you have any questions. Let me know if you are interested in proceeding.

        thanks

        David Emerson

        Reply
sue says 5 years ago

Hi David
Help please

What do you have to cure my papillary thyroid cancer natural ?
Thanks

Reply
DonaldNak says 5 years ago

Hi,

Stumbled upon this space and just checking out what peoplebeatingcancer.org is all about!

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Donald,

    PeopleBeatingCancer is an online resource for cancer patients, survivors and caregivers. I am a long-term cancer survivor myself and a cancer coach.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Jessica says 5 years ago

David-

My mother was diagnosed with therapy related Leukemia (AML). She had Gallbladder cancer in 2012 and the combination of chemo and radiation has in turn caused Acute Myeloid Leukemia. She started her first round of chemo yesterday, 1/7/15. The chance of the chemo working is 50/50 as her lungs and heart are unable to withstand the normal cocktail of drugs they would give a healthy person in this situation. I have consumed my every waking minute to looking on the internet and finding natural cures or supplements to help her thru chemo and make the end result as good as possible. And IF she goes into remission, keeping her on a regime to keep her as healthy as possible and with us for as long as possible. I have read so many different things that can “help, cure, etc.” that I don’t know where to start. Please help!!

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Jessica-

    If you can tell me the names of the chemotherapies that your mom is taking I will research possible integrative supplementation. For example, CoQ10 has been documented to reduce or eliminate anthrocycline induced heart damage.

    If you are interested I can suggest anti-angiogenic nutrition and supplementation to support your mom’s therapy. I am a long term blood cancer survivor myself and I supplement with antioxidants to keep me in remission.

    Let me know what your mom is taking.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Michael says 5 years ago

David,

I am a healthy and fit 59 year old male. No health issues at all, except about three and a half years ago a lesion just under 2cm in diameter was discovered near my pylorus, within the wall of the stomach. Non symptomatic, no biopsy done (my request), but it was strongly recommended to be removed. It appears not to have changed in three years, but I started getting pain in my upper abdomen, fight below the breast plate. Mild, constant, focused pain that could last half a day or longer. As I studied the effects of stomach surgery to remove the lesion (assessed to be a GIST), I realized that I do not want to have stomach surgery at all – so far, it seems that the cure would be worse than the disease.

My question is: how can I shrink this particular type of lesion?

What supplements or natural products would be best to at least keep this from growing? Loss of 1/3 of my stomach, and the pylorus, seems a worse outcome for the time being.

Any help would be highly appreciated.

Thank you,

Michael

P.S. Regular pharma (Gleevec) is extremely expensive, and I have no insurance to cover the costs.

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Michael-

    I agree that it is important to avoid the cure being worse than the disease syndrome. You are correct to focus on this quality of life issue.

    Yes, there are antioxidant supplements that studies cite to shrink tumors, polyps, etc. however I know of no studies that focus specifically on GIST and supplements. Further, supplementation shrinks growths slowly- over months and years. The studies that I would provide would talk about, for example, green tea extract (ECGC) shrinking endometrial polyps.

    As for a surgical solution, please read the study that has been linked and excerpted below. In short, the study talks about a type of surgery for small gist tumors that should not remove 1/3 of your stomach- the study says “minimum necessary resection.”

    If you are interested in learning more about this type of surgery I would recommend learning about specific centers and or surgeons can perform this type of surgery. I can research this who, and where if you would like.

    If insurance/cost is an issue I would suggest getting prices for this type of surgery. While I’m sure that any hospitals asked about the price tag for a specific procedure will be tight-lipped, I think I could at least get an approximation of the costs.

    Again, I can research more info if you would like- I need guidance before I do more research. Let me know.

    A novel technique to minimize deformation of the stomach in laparoscopic partial gastrectomy for intraluminal gastric GISTs.
    “The laparoscopic approach would be difficult to perform without causing deformation of the stomach in managing gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) of the intraluminal type, especially in those that are located in the posterior gastric wall or around the gastroesophageal junction and the pylorus, because intraluminal GISTs usually require an excessive resection of the gastric wall for cure. We present a novel surgical technique for successful management of intraluminal gastric GISTs that minimizes deformation of the stomach regardless of tumor location…

    Our laparoscopic procedure for gastric GISTs is simple and allows us easy and precise removal of the tumor and closure of the gastric wall with minimum necessary resection, regardless of the location and growth form of the tumors.”

    laproscopic surgery defined

    David Emerson

    Reply
      Michael says 5 years ago

      Dear David,

      Thank you very, very much!

      I read the abstract and saved it on my computer for future reference.
      Since GIST are slow growing, I would take the risk of supplementation with whatever you think may work.

      The cost issue was only in respect of Imanitib or Gleevec. The surgery itself here in Toronto, Canada would be covered by our universal public health system. Purchases of Gleevec are not.

      I was told that in case of an operation I would lose my entire pylorus and a good portion of the stomach – life without pylorus seems to be full of misery.

      If you would please list whatever supplements I should take, I will definitely do it.

      You are doing an amazing job, thank you.

      Here’s a link to another article that you may find interesting:

      http://www.jpost.com/Business-and-Innovation/Health-and-Science/Opening-their-eyes-437828

      It is in the same spirit of what you do, on a different scale and in another place, but also very inspiring.

      Thank you, G-d bless you!

      Michael

      Reply
        Michael says 5 years ago

        Hello David,

        I can only get the abstract of the article from the link you provided (thank you again! Very hopeful).

        But, how can I read or print the entire article, so I can share it with my surgeon when the time comes??

        Would you please tell me what needs to be done to get it?

        Thank you,

        Michael

        Reply
          David Emerson says 5 years ago

          Hi Michael-

          As is often the case, medical pubs will list an abstract on pubmed and then require a fee to read the entire article. It is up to you but an argument can be made for spending $51 to get the full article. I don’t know if you can copy/paste or print the document. My guess is that you can’t…

          That is the case here-

          I will reply to your other email now- D

          http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1089/lap.2014.0184

          Reply
Rose says 5 years ago

Hi David,
Do you have any information about integrated or holistic treatment for cervical cancer. As a result of a late diagnosis, my daughter has had to have one Leep surgery already and another has been recommended after lab work came back. they are now suggesting a hysterectomy will be necessary. As you can imagine, we she is devastated- she is only 27 and has always wanted a family. I have always believed in the importance of providing our bodies with the best and cleanest food possible. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated….and the surgery will probably be scheduled very soon. Thanks for any recommendations.

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Rose-
    I am sorry to learn of your daughter’s cervical cancer diagnosis. In order for me to provide information about cancer therapies for cervical cancer I will need to learn the specific stage of your daughter’s cervical cancer diagnosis.

    While a woman can get bear children after a leep procedure, she cannot get pregnant after a hysterectomy (though I’m sure you knew this).

    If I understand your email, you and your daughter are weighing cervical cancer therapies (leep only vs. hysterectomy) and pregnancy? Leep may be used for early cervical cancer but if I understand you, your daughter’s cervical cancer may be more advanced and therefore require more extensive treatment than leep?

    For the record, my sister could not conceive naturally, adopted two boys and none of us can imagine a world in which my two nephews are not in our lives. Please take this in the spirit in which it is intended.

    If you reply with your daughter’s stage I will provide the treatment recommendations based on my findings.

    thanks

    David Emerson

    Reply
Nicole says 5 years ago

Bless you for sharing this information! My Prince, my husband of 20 years, father to our two children  was diagnosed  with Stage 4 Renal Cancer (left-kidney) 9/14/15. He is 46, healthy, although a smoker for many years (has quit for 8). There was a tumor on the kidney and 3 involved lymph nodes that were all removed. They see spots on his lungs so he began Sutent just this week and we want to try alternative therapies; what do you know about b-17 or sodium bicarbonate cancer treatments? Help with side affects – fatigue? Or anything else? I have taken down all the suggestions you have here, but they are all for different cancers. How do we get thru this all? We are only keeping it together by the grace of God. I want to say to his oncologist, “please don’t tell me he is incurable! You are not God!” I don’t think I can do that without losing my cool. We hear he is the best, (and Brian is happy with him) but he repeatedly brings in the terms, “we can treat you, not cure you”. He initially gave him 2 years. We are beyond devastated. ANYTHING you can say is greatly appreciated. I am so glad you are cancer-free, Thank you David, you bring hope to many! 🙂 *~Nic

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Nicole-

    I am sorry to read about your husband’s renal cancer. Yes, a cancer diagnosis is difficult to “get through.” You are correct in thinking that conventional oncology is limited in thinking that a case is “incurable.” Always remember that I was terminal after 3 years of aggressive therapies. That was back in 1997 so there is always hope.

    Several things. First, by surgically removing your husband’s tumors and effected lymph nodes you have already reduced or debulked his cancer. When your onc. tells you that ““we can treat you, not cure you” he is saying that there are no conventional therapies to cure your husband. Therefore you two must think beyond conventional therapies.

    Antioxidant therapies to consider are

    lycopene-

    milk thistle-

    Curcumin-

    resveritrol

    omega 3 fatty acids

    grapefruit extract

    Daily moderate exercise such as a brisk walk, no smoking of course, no alcohol for awhile anyway-

    Nicole- I can provide links to those brands of the supplements above if you are interested. Let me know. Lastly, your husband’s situation is serious so please act aggressively.

    Let me know if you have any questions. Hang in there…

    David Emerson

    Reply
      Nicole says 5 years ago

      Thank you so very much for your reply & recommendations, they mean more than you know; I am on it! 🙂 🙂

      Reply
      Nicole says 5 years ago

      I would appreciate any links, too! TY! 🙂

      Reply
      Nicole says 5 years ago

      Good grief! Not a surprise, but what now, we have to decide without approval from the Onc. to do anything alternatively? This is the response from our Dr. when asking for his opinion on your rec. above… It is Dr. S’s recommendation not to combine the alternative therapies mentioned below while Brian is taking Sutent as we do not know how they will interact with Sutent.

      Please let us know if you have any additional questions…
      [Really, not helpful!] 🙁

      Reply
Tamika says 5 years ago

What about brain cancer? Any natural cures or diets?

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Tamika-

    Yes, there are a variety of complimentary, integrative (supplements to make chemo MORE effective) and conventional therapies that treat brain cancer. What is the exact diagnosis ( meningioma, astrocytoma, glioblasgtoma for example). What stage?

    The more information I have the more therapies I can provide you. Both conventional and non conventional.

    Let me know. Thanks.

    David Emerson
    Survivor, Director PBC

    Reply
      Robert Bedford says 5 years ago

      Hi David, I was diagnosed with a Glioblastoma multiforma stage 4 Brain tumor in July 2014 and have since had two operations to remove as much of the tumor as possible.
      I am taking chemotherapy tablets, 340mg, 5 days every month and I also take Valproic Acid, 2000mg, dilantin,1000mg, Dexamethasone, 1 6mg every day.
      I have been lookin into alternative form’s of treatment and was wondering what you think.

      Reply
Tamika says 5 years ago

What about brain cancer? Any natural cured or diets?

Reply
Cure Your Cancer- "If I knew then what I know now. says 5 years ago

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Reply
janet says 5 years ago

Very educative.i have a question i have been having pains in my chest for sometime now,my doctor put me pregabalin75mg,i wonder is that the appropriete drug?or should i seek second opinion?.

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Janet-

    Thanks. It is a trite saying but knowledge is power, especially when referring to one’s health. Yes, I would get a second opinion. I know nothing of your case of course but I do know that a full, accurate diagnosis is the key to any/all health treatment.

    thanks

    David Emerson

    Reply
Carrie says 5 years ago

Hi, Dave. I am 47 and have recently been diagnosed with stage 1 invasive ductal carcinoma. I had a mastectomy with reconstruction on Sept. 10, 2015. The findings on the final pathology report were DCIS with 8 smaller tumors found in the tissue, the biggest one about 3.5mm. The grade was 3. The margins were also very narrow, about 2mm. Estsrogen receptor is positive, and HER2 is positive. I have been referred to an oncologist, but haven’t seen one yet. I am struggling with the decision to do conventional or natural treatment. I am worried about the toxicity of the chemo if needed and understand that chemo can also cause more cancer elsewhere. But I am also afraid of putting my faith 100% in natural treatment. I have done some research on the subject and am very confused as to what to do. Any suggestions?

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    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Carrie-

    I am sorry to read of your IDC stage 1 and DCIS diagnosis. Your struggle is understandable. By that I mean that what you are thinking through is one of the, if not the most studied issues in cancer treatment today. You are in good company…

    My comments below combined with the info I have linked from BreastCancer.org will break down the issues and address each. The more you read, the more you learn (from all sources) the better your decision-making will be. There are no guarantees in cancer treatment of course but choices we make now dictate what happens in the future.

    1) A single mastectomy to remove your cancer is that therapy that reduces your risk of relapse more than any other therapy. Please read the BreastCancer.org article linked and excerpted below. This article describes your situation pretty well.

    Treatment for DCIS

    Oncotype DX Breast Cancer Assay-

    2) Testing your biopsy to learn more about your risk of relapse.

    “The Oncotype DX DCIS test is a genomic test that can help you and your doctor make decisions about treatments after surgery for DCIS. The Oncotype DX DCIS test analyzes the activity of a group of genes that can help doctors figure out a woman’s risk of DCIS coming back and/or the risk of a new invasive cancer developing in the same breast, as well as how likely she is to benefit from radiation therapy after lumpectomy.

    The Oncotype DX DCIS test results assign a Recurrence Score — a number between 0 and 100 — to the DCIS. You and your doctor can use the following ranges to interpret your results:”

    3) Estrogen receptor positive and her2 positive- your onc. will encourage reducing your body’s production of estrogen. There are “natural” therapies and chemotherapies to do this. Aromatase inhibitors are given to reduce your estrogen. There are pluses and minuses to this therapy. Oncology has taken to NOT referring to tamoxifen/arimidex, etc. as “chemotherapy.” I disagree with this practice as aromatase inhibitors are a toxic chemical therapy, the definition of chemotherapy. Yes, studies indicate that aromatase inhibitors do reduce the risk of early BC relapse for estrogen pos. BC. Yes, there are therapies to reduce the risk of these side effects. Let me know if you choose to undergo aromatase inhibitors.

    There are non-toxic supplements to reduce the bodies’ production of estrogen. Let me know if you would like me to research this more.

    Click this link to read more

    Finally, I will plug lifestyle as therapy. I rely on my own lifestyle to keep me in complete remission from my cancer, multiple myeloma (that universally returns…) and I have remained cancer free since ’99. Please read the link and give serious consideration to these therapies-

    As an example- moderate, daily exercise. There is a GREAT deal of research citing the importance of regular, moderate exercise. Nutritional supplementation such as cucumin, omega 3 fatty acids, vitamin D, etc. Let me know if you would like the brands that I use, doses, etc.

    Slash Your Breast Cancer Risk of Relapse Now!

    Sorry for such a long reply. Please let me know if you have any questions or would like clarifications.

    thanks and hang in there.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Olga says 5 years ago

David I hope I can be as lucky as you and put this myeloma in remission..I’m heading towards my second stem cell transplant..i got 6 years from the first…question is I’m on 25mg of revlimid plus dex at the moment and I’ve read different stories about green tea and revlimid…I know they tell you not to take it while on velcade but have you heard anything about not taking it while on revlimid…

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Your Cancer Diagnosis and Prognosis - PeopleBeatingCancer says 6 years ago

[…] integrative treatments will best support your chosen therapy? Here is the number one supplement that keeps me cancer […]

Reply
Cherie says 6 years ago

Please lete know what to use . I have multiple myeloma, stage three kappa lightchain with still 20 percent bone marrow involvement. Many lesions and fractures and been 3 years on two chemo drugs. Thank you so much for youf help!!!!

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    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Cherie-
    I am sorry to learn of your myeloma diagnosis. I would like to answer your question “Please lete know what to use…and been 3 years on two chemo drug” In order to talk about possible therapies for your myeloma treatment I need to know what therapies you have already used and may or may not be ineffective.

    Let me know, thanks

    David Emerson

    Reply
Susan says 6 years ago

Hi David,

Bless you for providing this information, it is a God-send. I (62 y/o female) was diagnosed with Stage 4 Renal Cancer (l-kidney) in 2011. I received radiation to my left arm (3 wks.) where the metastasis had resided, then was given Sutent for 3 years until my oncologist felt that it no longer was productive, although no new lesions had been found, the tumor in the kidney had grown slightly according to him and he proposed a new drug. So I took a self-imposed “break” and was hopeful that trying more of a dietary approach would have miraculous results. But I began to experience pain in May of this year and my new oncologist in Austin, TX reviewed my history and felt that I should now receive radiation for the 3 new lesions which had appeared in the cervix of my spine, at the base of the spine and the arm lesion, which was now larger. I also began a regimen of 2 5mg caplets of Inlyta twice/day in addition to the Methadone I take 3 times/day @ 10mg/dose for some severe pain. This hopefully will cease once the radiation has shrunk these lesions. Needless to say, I am praying for a miracle or spontaneous remission, but that of course is the hope of all cancer patients. I am otherwise healthy with the exception of glaucoma (take eyedrops for that) and currently my body weight is about 117 lbs due to the suppressed appetite from the pain meds. Prior to that, I weighed about 135 lbs. Can you offer me some suggestions? I would like to be partnered with one of the genius physicians who save the wealthy. But of course, who wouldn’t. Anyway, that pretty much sums it up and I would really like your professional opinion regarding my current treatment and/or if I should seek out something/someone else to treat me. Your response is very much appreciated.

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    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Susan-

    I to say that you seem to be in great spirits considering all the meds you have gone through. You seem to understand both sides of the hope that all cancer patients live with. Keep in mind that a experimental therapy took me from terminal to cancer-free status…in ’99. There is always hope.

    Now then. I am going to spend time offering nutritionally based, non-conventional therapies thinking that you have access to conventional or traditional oncology. Further, bone mets put you into a more serious situation. Lastly, being thin is great for your heart but I don’t think you should lose too much more weight…intense toxicities can cause cachexia aka loosing too much weight.

    Both of these therapies are evidence-based as linked in the blog posts. Please read and consider pursuing these therapies- they should not interfere with any of the conventional therapies that you are currently doing. You should talk to your onc. of course.

    Ketogenic Diet and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy as Cancer therapy
    Avemar Cancer Therapy

    This last therapy for you to consider is more of a long shot. This is one of those therapies that has been studied for decades off and on but is controversial. Please give the therapy serious consideration.
    Intravenous vitamin C therapy

    Please let me know if you have any questions.

    Thanks and hang in there.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Judy says 6 years ago

My husband was diagnosed in Feb 2015 with multiple myeloma. Wondering if you can direct me to any research that has been done on his aggressive form of this disease.

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    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Judy-
    I am sorry to learn of your husband’s mm diagnosis. The good news is that there are many therapies available to you- conventional, non-conventional, and integrative.

    As for myeloma research, yes, I can direct you to so much mm research that you will become an expert in no time.

    By “aggressive form of the disease” are you referring to genetic markers, his stage, blood work, or some other diagnostic findings?
    In other words, I can provide more focused info and or research based on the info you are looking for. I will ask a few questions below-

    1) how old is your husband? Any health issues (beside mm)
    2) what stage or what symptoms- bone pain, kidney involvement, etc.
    3) Bood work? Blood diagnostics?

    I don’t mean to sound nosey Debbie. I’m just trying to save you time and aggravation- caregiving an mmer is tough enough.

    Let me know, thanks

    David

    Reply
Annette says 6 years ago

Hi David,
I was diagnosed with Multiple Myeloma in April 2013. A few months later was also diagnosed with kidney disease and auto immune hepatitis. I’ve always been a strong believer in alternative medicine so I tried the curcumin protocol, other supplements and homeopathic remedies but after a year it was greatly affecting my kidneys so I reluctantly went on chemo to get my numbers under control. I also started acupuncture along with herbs and have continued it ever since. After 10 months I was in remission and opted not to continue with maintenance chemo but continue with acupuncture and herbs, which I feel has helped me to stay in remission since October 2014. My question is, because Multiple Myeloma is such a difficult cancer to treat, what alternative therapies work the best or have had the most success for long term survival?

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    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Annette-

    I normally begin by telling the patient that I am sorry to learn of their cancer diagnosis. You, however, have managed your cancer and your other health challenges well. And since you came in on the CIA page, it is clear that you understand the need for all forms of therapies, conventional, integrative and alternative.

    I’ll try to be more specific. To address your question “because Multiple Myeloma is such a difficult cancer to treat, what alternative therapies work the best or have had the most success for long term survival?” I think we mmers must do exactly what you have been doing.

    Conventional- we can agree that conventional toxic chemo should only be used when an mmer really needs it. It looks like your numbers increased (your mm increased…) so you underwent a chemotherapy such as Velcade to come back into remission. Velcade has shown the ability to kill mm while helping kidney function.

    Integrative- to continue talking about Velcade, if you need to use this chemo again someday, I will link studies below that cite curcumin/resveritrol/CBD’s ability to ENHANCE Velcade anti-mm action while minimizing toxicity-

    Alternative- you are correct- myeloma is a very difficult cancer to keep in remission and therefore die of old age. I agree with you to employ homeopathy, nutritional supplements (curcumin, resveritrol, green tea extract (not during Velcade)) in order to stay as healthy as long as possible.
    I continue to supplement with curcurmin, resveritrol, wobenzyme N, milk thistle, green tea extract, vitamin D3, daily and I have been in remission since 4/99. I do NOT consider myself to be cured. I work to remain in complete remission.

    To answer your question I will tell you to do what I do- all the supps above plus moderate regular exercise to keep our bones strong, keep the lbs. off, eat nutritiously-

    I hope this all makes sense, all helps.

    let me know if you have any questions.

    thanks

    David Emerson

    Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Anette-

    I almost forgot-
    Integrative use of Velcade-

    Reply
Russell Landor says 6 years ago

Can I have natural intercourse with my wife after chemotherapy treatment ended almost one month ago?
I am asking natural without condone.
after two months without treatment, can I try for a newborn daughter?
Thank you in advance for replying.

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    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Russell-
    Without knowing your wife’s diagnosis its difficult to give a definitive answer to your question. The link below will take you to the American Cancer Society’s explanation of many issues you are asking about.
    Sex and chemotherapy

    David Emerson

    Reply
Pat says 6 years ago

Is there any type of alternative treatment therapy for a person with stage 3 type? ovarian cancer at the end of chemotherapy management of the disease. The oncologist is not recommending further chemotherapy nor clinical trials at this time.

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    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Pat-

    Yes, there are a variety of both integrative and alternative therapies. I can offer specific info based on your needs.
    What is your current status (beside stage 3 ovarian cancer)? Are you in remission of any kind?
    What is your health status? Any health issues that may effect your therapies?
    What chemotherapies did you undergo? What affect, if any, did they have on your cancer?

    If your onc is not recommending chemo or trials at this time does that mean that you are in remission? While I don’t mean to sound personal, the more info I have about your current health status the more info I can relay.

    thanks and let me know,

    David Emerson

    Reply
      Maryann Foti says 5 years ago

      Have a groth about 1 inch long It is rectal cancer. Doctors said it did not get into my limp notes I am supposed to take chemo pill 5 a day two in the morning and the rest at night low dosage Then Radiation every day mon through Fri a half hour a day for 5 to 6 weeks

      Reply
        David Emerson says 5 years ago

        Hi Maryann-

        I am sorry to read of your rectal cancer diagnosis. Did your oncologist give you a stage for your cancer? Do you have a question for me?

        David Emerson

        Reply
    Jimmy says 6 years ago

    May I recommend the book “The Amazing Power of Fucoidan” it’s written by a well known Oncologist from Japan Dr. Tachikawa. He has applied the use of conventional treatment and Fucoidan dietary supplement to his treatments for over 10 years. Based on the research and his successful application of fucoidan, people have been able to tolerate conventional treatment side effects, see their cancer diminish in size, and or to fully recover.

    Reply
      David Emerson says 6 years ago

      Hi Jimmy-

      Thank you for your recommendation. I will go look into the book and the dietary supplement now.

      David Emerson

      Reply
      Steven says 6 years ago

      I just purchased a bottle of Fucoidan for my father who’s battling pancreatic cancer. I would absolutely love to hear anyone’s thoughts, experiences or suggestions on the subject. I just purchased the books “The Amazing Power of Fucoidan” and am looking forward to increasing my knowledge of this potentially helpful supplement. Thanks in advance for any and all information!

      Reply
    nora says 5 years ago

    oil is what i would use if i were you.
    what state are you in? You can use it
    to see if it will keep your cancer in
    remission (or at least not growing), as
    a maint. drug. or if you need actual
    treatment, that too. What I am suggesting
    is illegal in some parts of anywhere. If
    you would not mind living illegally,it
    is worth a go. Otherwise, we will die
    legally.

    Reply
      mario says 5 years ago

      Nora,you mention using “OIL” as a therapy for cancer.Could you please explain what kind of oil,how to use it +++ Thank you,Mario

      Reply
    Nora Burnham says 5 years ago

    Pat, I would love to hear what you have found out since this posting……Nora

    Reply
Sea says 6 years ago

Is it true for breast cancer that the type of treatment (chemo, radiation, the pill)is determined by what makes the cancer grow?

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    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Ciera-

    The “standard of care” treatment that an oncologist recommends for a breast cancer diagnosis will depend on a range of factors including stage (at diagnosis), age, physical condition, any family history or possible genetic markers. I don’t know if this answer helps you or not. Let me know if you have any other questions. There are non-conventional therapies that may act based on how cancer grows but this is another email.

    David Emerson

    Reply
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