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Prostate Cancer? Avoid Overtreatment- Take These Steps Before Choosing Surgery or Radiation

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…as many as 60% of men who have initial treatment for low-risk prostate cancer might not have required any therapy in their lifetimes. Most of these men will have at least one long-term adverse effect of treatment…

A growing number of studies document the fact that prostate cancer is over-diagnosed and over-treated. Maybe your PSA has increased since your last test. Maybe your Gleason score is a bit higher than you’d like. Do you treat? Do you watch and wait? Before you consider active prostate cancer therapy read the articles linked and excerpted below carefully.

Prostate Cancer? 11 Steps to Take Before Choosing Surgery or RadiationWhen I say “active therapy” I am referring to active conventional or FDA approved therapies such as removing your prostate (radical prostatectomy), or radiating your prostate. Both therapies can cause long-term and late stage side effects.
The fact is there are dozens of evidence-based non-conventional therapies shown to slow reduce the risk of prostate cancer.
I am both a cancer survivor and cancer coach. Have you been diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer? To learn more about evidence-based, non-toxic prostate cancer therapies please scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.
Thank you,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


Observation of Prostate Cancer Safe, Saves $$$

“Observation topped initial treatment for low-risk prostate cancer in terms of cost and effectiveness, according to a decision-analysis study…Both active surveillance and watchful waiting proved more effective and less expensive than immediate treatment. In a comparison of the two observation strategies, watchful waiting added 2 months of quality-adjusted life expectancy and saved $11,000 to $15,000 versus active surveillance, depending on the patient’s age…

Recent evidence suggests as many as 60% of men who have initial treatment for low-risk prostate cancer might not have required any therapy in their lifetimes, the authors noted in their introduction. Most of these men will have at least one long-term adverse effect of treatment…

Prostate Cancer? 11 Steps to Take Before Choosing Surgery or Radiation

 In the last few years there has been a quantum leap in prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment. The problem is, many patients don’t know about it–and neither do their doctors. Studies have shown that it can take 10-15 years for new technologies to reach doctors and change their methods. Men with prostate cancer can’t wait! They don’t have to–the breakthroughs in prostate cancer care are here and available today.

An elevated PSA doesn’t necessarily mean you have cancer. Nor should it automatically trigger a biopsy. The presence of cancer cells doesn’t always mean you need a radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy. In fact, the opposite is true. Most men with prostate cancer–up to 85 percent–don’t require such radical interventions, yet most of them end up getting surgery or radiation anyway.

Based on the very latest medical knowledge and technologies, here’s a safer, leading-edge approach to take after tests show you have an elevated PSA level.

Step 1: Ask your doctor for a DRE (digital rectal exam) to feel for any irregularities, bumps, or elevations, and an ultrasound to measure prostate size. Then…

Step 2: If there is a possible prostate infection, treat with antibiotics. Then…

Step 3: Get a second PSA test. There are a number of factors that can skew PSA numbers, so it’s important to repeat the test. If again elevated, then…

Step 4: Obtain an Advanced Prostate MRI from a center that has the 3.0 Tesla machine. This is a breakthrough technology that is 85-90% accurate in identifying a cancer mass, even small masses of 5 millimeters. Then…

Step 5: Consider getting a Color Doppler Ultrasound test if there’s a center near you that offers it. This test can show you a high-resolution image and pinpoint where cancer is present. If cancer is found, your urologist will then be able to perform a more accurate, targeted biopsy. Then…

Step 6: If possible, try to obtain a targeted biopsy instead of the typical blind biopsy. Doctors knowledgeable about the advanced prostate MRI and Color Doppler Ultrasound will know about the benefits of a targeted biopsy. Rather than taking random samples as is usually done, your doctor will now be able to guide the biopsy needle to the most suspicious areas, greatly increasing the chance of obtaining highly reliable results. Then…

Step 7: If the targeted biopsy reveals cancer, ask if it would be helpful to obtain a second pathology analysis from a different center or institution. You have nothing to lose from doing this, and labs do make mistakes. Then…

Step 8: Join a prostate cancer support group, where you can obtain valuable information from a patient’s point of view. Sometimes these men are better informed about the newest technologies and treatments than doctors. Also, do your own research, searching the internet for information about tests, treatments, benefits, and risks. Then…

Step 9: Collect your data and have all your test results and dates in a single table so you can track changes over time. Discuss your results with your doctor and ask as many questions as you need. You’ll want to know what treatment your doctor suggests for your type of cancer. If he recommends surgery or radiation therapy, ask if you may speak with the surgeon or radiologist. Then…

Step 10: Consider getting a second opinion. Your urologist is most likely a surgeon, so it’s natural for him to have a surgical point of view. Be sure to find out if there are alternatives to surgery or radiation therapy you should consider such as cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), or laser therapy. Then…

Step 11: Decide on your treatment based on all your test results and the knowledge you’ve gained. Congratulate yourself for taking an active role in your present and future health, and for making decisions that are well informed and based on the most up-do-date information available.

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