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Recently Diagnosed or Relapsed? Stop Looking For a Miracle Cure, and Use Evidence-Based Therapies To Enhance Your Treatment and Prolong Your Remission

Multiple Myeloma an incurable disease, but I have spent the last 25 years in remission using a blend of conventional oncology and evidence-based nutrition, supplementation, and lifestyle therapies from peer-reviewed studies that your oncologist probably hasn't told you about.

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Refractory Relapsed Myeloma- Antineoplaston Therapy

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“Yes, I am still in CR from my refractory MM and have been since I completed ANP therapy in 4/99. Because I am only only one MM survivor, I will link a summary of ANP for MM below.”

Dear David- Thank you for posting your experience with Dr. Burzynski’s treatment (antineoplaston therapy) and its effect on your multiple myeloma (MM). I was diagnosed with MM in 2015 and, like you, I am “refractory-” I have had multiple conventional treatments.  I have not yet been told that nothing else can be done by my conventional oncologist, but none of my eight treatments, including an autologous stem cell transplant, arrested my illness.

My best result was the transplant, which lasted for sixteen (16) months.   I have had many side-effects from all the treatments I have had so far, including damage to my heart caused by Kyprolis, chemobrain, and an impaired immune system.

I saw a video on YouTube recently that made a strong case for Dr. Burzynski’s methods.

I hope you are still in remission from MM.  Do you endorse antineoplaston therapy, given your success?  Do you have any updates on what you have posted concerning it that you would be willing to share?

Thank you very much and best regards, Richard-


Dear Richard,

The most complete way for me to answer your question is to outline my thinking on the issue of ANP for MM. Based on my logic you can better decide what you want to do.
Your current MM situation as I see it:
1) You have undergone eight (8) conventional MM therapies none “arresting your illness” (MM) or putting you into remission for more than 16 months. Your MM appears to be refractory.
2) Your conventional therapies thus far have resulted in short, long-term and possibly late stage side effects- heart damage, chemobrain and immune dysfunction in particular.
3) Though you have not reached “MDR (multi-drug resistance), judging my this email, you are wondering just how many more conventional therapies you can undergo.

Antineoplaston Therapy (ANP) as possible MM treatment:

1) Yes, I am still in complete remission and have been since I completed ANP therapy in 4/99. Because I am only only one MM survivor, I will link a summary of ANP for MM below.
2) While I don’t know if ANP is truly “non-toxic” as it is high in sodium, I consider it to be pretty harmless when compared to the many toxic chemotherapy regimens I underwent from ’94-’97.
3) I endorse ANP as long as the MM patient/survivor understands his/her choices. In other words, in your case, as I see it, you are similar to me in that you have undergone many conventional MM therapies and seem to be approaching MDR. Also like me, you have withstood a great deal of toxicity and your body/immune function is wearing out.
4) My last qualification always, is to confirm the potential expense of ANP therapy. While it has been almost 20 years since my experience at the BRI, my understanding is that your health insurer will likely NOT pay for ANP treatment.
5) And last but not least, according to the medical records listed below, I believe that of the 21 MM patients who underwent ANP, 36% achieved either a complete response or a partial response. ANP is not a silver bullet cure for MM. Having said this, ANP can provide a realistic therapy option for MM patients and survivors.
At this point in my reply, I have to include a plug for the evidence-based, non-conventional MM therapies that I have followed since my experience at the BRI. I believe that all MM patient’s must pursue evidence-based integrative, complementary and lifestyle MM therapies to manage their MM and side effects long term.
If you have any questions, let me know.
thanks and hang in there,
David Emerson
MM Survivor
MM Cancer Coach
Director PeopleBeatingCancer

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PERSONALIZED TREATMENT AT BURZYNSKI CLINIC

Comparison of Responses in 20 selected most common cancers (as of September 21, 2015)
Diagnosis
No. of patients
OR (%)
SD (%)
PD (%)
Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma
131
64
26
10
Breast Cancer
433
62
23
15
Carcinoma of unknown primary
42
57
36
7
Prostate Cancer
322
53
38
9
Ovarian Cancer
99
51
29
20
Head and Neck Cancer
87
51
29
20
Colon Cancer
229
51
28
21
Hodgkin’s Disease
16
50
38
12
Kidney Cancer
41
49
34
17
Malignant melanoma
63
49
21
30
Lung Cancer
179
46
33
21
Urinary Bladder and Urothelial Cancer
39
45
32
23
Esophageal and Stomach Cancer
55
44
29
27
Liver Cancer
20
40
25
35
Uterine, Cervix, Vulvar, Endometrium
51
39
31
30
Brain Tumor
189
37
39
24
Multiple Myeloma
21
36
43
Biliary Tract Tumor
20
30
40
30
Pancreatic Cancer
55
24
51
25
Mesothelioma
17
24
41
35
     Data based on medical records of 2,280 evaluable patients 
DEFINITIONS:
OR: Objective Response – includes CR and PR.
CR: Complete Response.  Complete disappearance of all signs of cancer in response to treatment of 4 weeks or longer.
PR: Partial Response.  More than 50% decrease in the size of the tumors  in response to treatment of 4 weeks or longer.
SD: Stable Disease.  No decrease or increase in the size of the tumors, but no progression, in response to treatment of 12 weeks or longer.
PD: Progressive Disease.  More then 50% increase in size of the tumors (the sum of cross-sectional area of the tumors), in response to treatment of 4 weeks or longer.
Evaluable Patients.  Patients who remained on treatment long enough to enable an objective evaluation of the response

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