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Sorafenib for Heptocellular/Liver Cancer- Less is More

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Patients with the most common type of liver cancer who are taking the chemotherapy drug sorafenib can begin their treatment with a lower dose than is currently considered standard, and it will not affect how long they live when compared to patients who start on the full dose…

Let me see…according to the article linked below, liver cancer patients can take lower doses of sorafenib, experience fewer side effects, spend a lot less money on this expensive chemotherapy…and live just as long?

 

Please don’t misunderstand me. My understanding is that sorafenib is essential for patients with advanced liver cancer. My point is simply that this chemotherapy regimen can bring serious adverse events (side effects) and is expensive.

Just as important to this discussion is the importance of evidence-based integrative therapies. According to research Curcumin synergizes sorafenib,  resveratrol synergizes sorafenib  and  Quercetin has been shown to reduce Sorafenib resistance.

I am a long-term survivor of a blood cancer called multiple myeloma. Conventional oncology hasn’t figured out how to cure MM. And the short, long-term and late stage side effects from FDA approved MM chemotherapy regimens are rough. My experience is that integrative, complementary and evidence-based non-conventional therapies can play an important role in the management of aggressive cancers like liver cancer and multiple myeloma.

I have managed to remain in complete remission from my MM by living an evidence-based, non-conventional, anti-MM lifestyle

To learn more about an evidence-based anti-liver cancer lifestyle, scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • Canccer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

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Liver cancer patients can start with lower dose of chemotherapy and live just as long

“Patients with the most common type of liver cancer who are taking the chemotherapy drug sorafenib can begin their treatment with a lower dose than is currently considered standard, and it will not affect how long they live when compared to patients who start on the full dose…

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common form of liver cancer among adults and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Currently, sorafenib is the only first-line treatment approved for HCC by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, but its side effects can be particularly difficult on patients. A recent study found 85 percent of HCC patients taking the drug experienced adverse events. In 31 percent of patients on that study, the effects were severe enough to stop treatment. The standard dose sorafenib is 400mg, twice per day

The controlled data showed the reduced dose had no effect on overall survival. Patients starting at a lower dose had a median survival of 198 days, compared to 195 days for patients starting at the full dose…

The cost saving was significant. The study found the reduced dose patients took an average of about 100 fewer pills over the course of their treatment. That translated to an average savings of about $3,000 per patient. Reiss noted those numbers are based on VA prices, which tend to be lower than other centers, meaning the real savings for many patients could be even larger…

“Our data suggest starting at a reduced dose is a safe strategy that can be used more commonly,” Reiss said.”

 

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