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Squamous cell Skin Cancer- Combine Conventional with Non-Conventional for higher Cure Rate

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A world-first trial has found patients with a type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma can be spared the effects of chemotherapy and treated using surgery and post-operative radiotherapy.

Squamous cell and Basil cell are the two types of non-melanoma skin cancer (SC) that make up the most common diagnosis of cancer in the United States annually. According to the ACS there are more than 3.5 million diagnoses of non-melanoma SC annually.

As you can see from the illustration below there are many ways to increase your risk of non-melanoma SC. The previous standard of care for a diagnosis of squamous cell SC was to surgically removed the SC and then give the patient chemotherapy in order to kill any cancer cells that had spread into the patients system.

The study and article linked and excerpted below cite the fact that chemotherapy does no good at lengthening overall survival (OS) in squamous cell skin cancer patients.

According to the study, squamous cell SC patients should surgically remove the tumor and then undergo local radiation to the affected area.

I am both a cancer survivor and cancer coach. The research into skin cancers has indicated that there are a number of evidence-based non-toxic, non-conventional therapies that patients should consider undergoing after surgery and local radiation for their SC.

Have you been diagnosed with skin cancer? What type? What stage? Please scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

thank you,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer¬†

Skin cancer: Squamous cell carcinoma trial offers some patients hope of avoiding chemotherapy

“A world-first trial has found patients with a type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma can be spared the effects of chemotherapy and treated using surgery and post-operative radiotherapy

The head of the trial, Professor Sandro Porceddu from the Princess Alexandra Hospital, said initially the addition of chemotherapy to treat this form of skin cancer was to sensitise patients to radiotherapy

But results of the trial revealed there was no difference in cure rates between those that received post-operative radiotherapy and others who were treated using post-operative chemo and radiotherapy

Those on treatment plans without chemotherapy can also suffer side-effects including red skin, a sore throat, fatigue, change in taste and thickening of saliva, but Professor Porceddu said the symptoms are resolved over a six-week period…

Mr Schampers said while the results could be applied to another type of skin cancer called basal cell carcinoma, it would not work for melanomas or other cancers…”

 

 

 

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