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Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer- IV Alpha Lipoid Acid, Low-Dose Naltrexone

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After only a few treatments of IV α-lipoic acid and IV vitamin C, his symptoms (renal cell carcinoma) began to improve…

While I think anecdotal evidence opens up cancer patients to only part of any success story I am writing about the example linked and excerpted below because the renal cell carcinoma patient below was given the same diagnosis that I was…basically that there was little hope with conventional therapies. And while we each have very different cancers, we were both end-stage… and here we are today.

Let me be direct. I think that cancer patients must begin their search with conventional cancer therapies. The RCC patient discussed below had stage 4 RCC cancer that had spread/metastasized. He had few options. Further, there is enough research available to give credibility to IV vitamin C, IV ALA, and LDN.

 

I am both a cancer survivor and cancer coach. I work with cancer patients and survivors to research and identify both conventional and evidence-based non-conventional therapies such as the therapies discussed below.

If you have been diagnosed with RCC and would like to learn more about your therapy options please scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


The Long-Term Survival of a Patient With Stage IV Renal Cell Carcinoma Following an Integrative Treatment Approach Including the Intravenous α-Lipoic Acid/Low-Dose Naltrexone Protocol

“In this case report, we describe the treatment of a 64-year-old male patient diagnosed with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in June of 2008. In spite of a left nephrectomy and the standard oncological protocols, the patient developed a solitary left lung metastasis that continued to grow.

He was informed that given his diagnosis and poor response to conventional therapy, any further treatment would, at best, be palliative

An integrative program—developed by one of the authors using

  • intravenous (IV) α-lipoic acid,
  • IV vitamin C,
  • low-dose naltrexone, and
  • hydroxycitrate, and
  • a healthy lifestyle program—was initiated.

From August 2010 to August 2015, the patient’s RCC with left lung metastasis was followed closely using computed tomography and positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging. His most recent positron emission tomography scan demonstrated no residual increased glucose uptake in his left lung. After only a few treatments of IV α-lipoic acid and IV vitamin C, his symptoms began to improve, and the patient regained his baseline weight. His energy and outlook improved, and he returned to work. The patient had stable disease with the disappearance of the signs and symptoms of stage IV RCC, a full 9 years following diagnosis, with a gentle integrative program, which is essentially free of side effects. As of November 2017, the patient feels well and is working at his full-time job.

 

 

Leave a Comment:

13 comments
Renal Cell- Relapse on Lungs- PeopleBeatingCancer says a few months ago

[…] Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer- IV Alpha Lipoid Acid, Low-Dose Naltrexone […]

Reply
Peter Britt says a couple of years ago

Burt Berkson’s in New Mexico uses iv Alpha Lipoic acid and low dose naltrexone to combat horrible cancers with metastases and “terminal” patients lived for years and some still alive .Other Integrative doctors use the same and other protocols ,

Reply
Shiningrice says 3 years ago

Hi David. Do you think Poly MPV IV is a good treatment for Stage 4 Kidney Cancer?

Reply
    David Emerson says 3 years ago

    Hi Shiningrice-

    I’m not very experienced about advanced kidney cancer and Poly MVA. I have linked the Poly website testimonials below. Also, your therapy options will be limited with stage 4 cancer. I would try multiple therapies and make every effort to manage my cancer.

    Poly MVA Kidney Cancer Testimonials

    Good luck,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Renal Cell Carcinoma Stage 4- Alpha Lipoic Acid/Low-dose Naltrexone - PeopleBeatingCancer says 4 years ago

[…] Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer- IV Alpha Lipoid Acid, Low-Dose Naltrexone […]

Reply
Tony says 4 years ago

Hi

I have RCC stage 4. I have need studying the ALA / LDN and I have decided to start this treatment soon.

For your info I have made a firm decision not to do any chemo.

Please advise what is the dosage and frequency of the ALA and LDN

Thanks and God Bless

Reply
Tony says 4 years ago

Hi David

I have RCC stage 4. I have need studying the ALA / LDN and I have decided to start this treatment soon.

For your info I have made a firm decision not to do any chemo.

Please advise what is the dosage and frequency of the ALA and LDN

Thanks and God Bless

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Tony-

    Several things. I am sorry to read of your stage 4 RCC. There are several evidence-based, non-toxic therapies that are cytotoxic to RCC as well as evidence-based integrative therapies- therapies that enhance the efficacy of chemotherapies. My point is that taking an integrative therapy approach is a middle ground- not conventional nor alternative. Something to consider.

    Regarding the research linked below- 1) the ALA/LDN therapy was administered at a clinic in New Mexico. The study refers to intravenous vitamin C therapy as well as some sort of general “healthy lifestyle program” The clinic administers the therapies with dosing. You should find a clinic with experience with administering ALA/LDN therapy. Lastly, the clinic used imaging equipment- CT, PET, etc. Also important for tracking your progress.

    My point is that there are many reasons to go to a clinic with experience administering ALA/LDN therapy.

    Let me know if you have other questions.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    The Long-Term Survival of a Patient With Stage IV Renal Cell Carcinoma Following an Integrative Treatment Approach Including the Intravenous α-Lipoic Acid/Low-Dose Naltrexone Protocol

    “In this case report, we describe the treatment of a 64-year-old male patient diagnosed with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in June of 2008. In spite of a left nephrectomy and the standard oncological protocols, the patient developed a solitary left lung metastasis that continued to grow. He was informed that given his diagnosis and poor response to conventional therapy, any further treatment would, at best, be palliative. The patient arrived at the Integrative Medical Center of New Mexico in August of 2010. He was in very poor health, weak, and cachectic. An integrative program—developed by one of the authors using intravenous (IV) α-lipoic acid, IV vitamin C, low-dose naltrexone, and hydroxycitrate, and a healthy life style program—was initiated. From August 2010 to August 2015, the patient’s RCC with left lung metastasis was followed closely using computed tomography and positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging. His most recent positron emission tomography scan demonstrated no residual increased glucose uptake in his left lung. After only a few treatments of IV α-lipoic acid and IV vitamin C, his symptoms began to improve, and the patient regained his baseline weight. His energy and outlook improved, and he returned to work. The patient had stable disease with disappearance of the signs and symptoms of stage IV RCC, a full 9 years following diagnosis, with a gentle integrative program, which is essentially free of side effects. As of November 2017 the patient feels well and is working at his full-time job.”

    Reply
Roger Robinson says 4 years ago

BTW, If you post my question, please don’t include my last name.

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Roger-

    First names only. In answer to your question about ALA and LDN as RCC therapy, though I have found a fair amount of research about ALA and LDN for various cancers, I have only found anecdotal research about RCC. I will add though, that there are other evidence-based, non-toxic therapies for RCC that are cytotoxic to RCC by themselves and/or integrative with conventional chemotherapy regimens.

    David Emerson

    David,

    Interesting web page you have. I have RCC. Do you know where I can find further info on using ALA & LDN to combat Rcc?
    Thanks very much,

    Reply
Roger Robinson says 4 years ago

David,
Interesting web page you have. I have RCC. Do you know where I can find further info on using ALA & LDN to combat Rcc?
Thanks very much,
Roger Robinson
Washington State
rogerarobinson@gmail.com

Reply
Gabriella Weatherhead says 4 years ago

Hi David, I’ve read your article, I have heard before about this man with RCC and his remission. My husband has metastatic RCC with multiple lung mets. He’s being offered targeted therapy with Sutent but he’s not very willing to start it as it has terrible side effects which can be life threatening and the effect is unpredictable, however it is palliative care at best.
We are keen to find any promising remedies. He has already tried a number of things in the 6 months between the CT scans but going by the latest results, they didn’t produce any results. At least the mets did not expand elsewhere from the lungs. But it is pretty bad as it is. So, any info you may have, I’m looking forward to hear it.
Many thanks.
Gabriella

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Gabriella,

    First and foremost, I am sorry to learn of your husband’s metastatic RCC. I agree with your husband that Sutent therapy brings many health challenges with it. Several things-

    I can’t provide “promising remedies.” I apologize for being so direct but my hope is that you will understand my approach. Yes, there are several evidence-based non-conventional therapies available to your husband but I can’t label any as “promising” at this stage.

    Having said that, I will follow with the fact that I was end-stage myself(different cancer) after 4 years of conventional therapies back in ’94-’97. As you know, the advanced RCC patient who underwent ALA and low dose Naltrexone achieved excellent results. So yes, there are available therapies…I’m just tring to adjust your expectations.

    I noticed that you registered for the general cancer coaching webinar. Experience has taught me that a spectrum of evidence-based therapies such as integrative and complementary therapies can be useful for survivors in your husband’s situation. If you haven’t watched the CC webinar, the program is comprized of anti-cancer nutrition, supplementation, detox. therapies, etc. that are then followed up by specific therapies for your specific cancer.

    An example would be a series of integrative therapies for RCC. For example, I would offer enhancing the anti-angiogenic properties of sorafenib with a non-toxic supplement called curcumin (I have been supplementing with curcumin for over ten years)

    Codelivery of sorafenib and curcumin by directed self-assembled nanoparticles enhances therapeutic effect on hepatocellular carcinoma.
    “In particular, in BEL-7402 cells induced tumor xenograft, SCN treatment displayed the obviously enhanced inhibitory effect on tumor progression over free drug monotherapy or their physical mixture, with significantly increased antiproliferation and antiangiogenesis capability. Thereby, the codelivered nanoassemblies of sorafenib and curcumin provided a promising strategy to enhance the combinational therapy of HCC.”

    At the same time I would encourage you to discuss with your oncologist non-curative therapies for your husband’s mets that could give him both the QOL and time needed for the integrative and complementary therapies to work.
    Evaluating Cryoablation of Metastatic Lung Tumors in Patients–Safety and Efficacy: The ECLIPSE Trial–Interim Analysis at 1 Year.
    ” Local tumor control rates were 56 of 58 (96.6%) and 49 of 52 (94.2%) at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Patient’s quality of life was unchanged over the follow-up period. One-year overall survival rate was 97.5%. The rate of pneumothorax requiring chest tube insertion was 18.8%. There were three Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events grade 3 procedural complications during the immediate follow-up period (pneumothorax requiring pleurodesis, noncardiac chest pain, and thrombosis of an arteriovenous fistula), with no grade 4 or 5 complications.
    CONCLUSION:
    Cryoablation is a safe and effective treatment for pulmonary metastases with preserved quality of life following intervention.”

    My experience is tha conventional oncology is limited, meaning they are focused on “standard-of-care” therapies. Your husband may be able to benefit greatly with both FDA approved and evidence-based but not FDA approved therapies.

    Let me know if you have any questions. Hang in there,

    David Emerson
    Cancer Surivivor
    Cancer Coach
    Director PeopleBeatingCancer

    Reply
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