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Recently Diagnosed or Relapsed? Stop Looking For a Miracle Cure, and Use Evidence-Based Therapies To Enhance Your Treatment and Prolong Your Remission

Multiple Myeloma an incurable disease, but I have spent the last 25 years in remission using a blend of conventional oncology and evidence-based nutrition, supplementation, and lifestyle therapies from peer-reviewed studies that your oncologist probably hasn't told you about.

Click the orange button to the right to learn more about what you can start doing today.

Multiple Myeloma Diagnosis- Survival Rates

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“”You will find information about the number of people with a multiple myeloma diagnosis each year. You will also read general information on surviving the disease…”

The average survival rates for a multiple myeloma diagnosis is 49%. This means that if you work with a conventional general oncologist (not a MM specialist) and do nothing but follow conventional FDA approved myeloma therapies your chances MM survival of five years is about 50/50.

Please keep in mind that a host of variables can change a person’s average survival including age, physical condition or co-morbidites, stage at diagnosis, and evidence-based, non-conventional MM therapies.

 

I believe that “survival averages” are misleading at best. I believe that newly diagnosed myeloma patients can learn more about their prognosis from what the American Cancer Society says about the average survival based on stage at diagnosis:

Revised International Staging System Median Survival
Stage I Has not been reached
Stage II 83 months
Stage III 43 months

I have lived with multiple myeloma since my diagnosis in 1994. I have been in complete remission since 4/99.

My experience as both a MM survivor and MM coach is that-

  • Survival rates for multiple myeloma depend on your therapy.
  • Your myeloma survival rate will depend largely on how you respond to your induction therapy.
  • And finally, I believe that your MM survival will depend largely on how you manage your cancer- both with conventional as well as non-conventional therapies.

While there is a long and growing list of FDA approved chemotherapy regimens for Multiple Myeloma and while autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) has seen some patients achieve long remissions, my experience is that high-dose toxic therapy can cause serious short, long-term and late stage collateral damage. I have learned that myeloma patients can undergo conventional FDA approved MM therapies and also maximize evidence-based, non-toxic myeloma therapies to maximize both quality of life and quantity of life.

If you or a loved one have been diagnosed with Multiple Myeloma, let me say this loud and clear:

It is critical that you become an active participant in your care. Learn everything you can.

I am alive today largely because I took the time to find out everything I could about Multiple Myeloma and sought out the full spectrum of evidence-based MM therapies both conventional (FDA approved) and non-conventional.

Your decision-making begins by learning about the full spectrum of evidence-based myeloma therapies, both conventional and non-conventional.  Here are some questions you may have right now:

  • Do Multiple Myeloma specialists know more about MM than regular oncologists? Yes.
  • What side effects should I expect from my induction chemotherapy? Prevention is key.
  • What do I do if I don’t reach complete remission? Don’t panic.
  • What therapies can I use that my oncologist won’t tell me about? Triplets are superior to doublets.
  • Does it matter if I wait to have an autologous stem cell transplant- No. Studies show there is no survival advantage either earlier or later. 

I am both a MM survivor and MM cancer coach.   If you have any questions, scroll down to the bottom of the page to leave a comment, and I will respond ASAP.

I wish you all the best on your Multiple Myeloma journey.

Hang in there,
David Emerson
  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


Multiple Myeloma: Statistics

“You will find information about the number of people who are diagnosed with multiple myeloma each year. You will also read general information on surviving the disease. Remember, survival rates depend on several factors. Use the menu to see other pages…

The 5-year survival rate tells you what percent of people live at least 5 years after the cancer is found.

  • Percent means how many out of 100.
  • The 5-year survival rate for people with multiple myeloma is over 50%.
  • For the 5% of people who are diagnosed at an early stage, the 5-year survival rate is 72%.
  • If the cancer has spread to a distant part of the body, the 5-year survival rate is almost 50%…”

Leave a Comment:

30 comments
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Jeanne Kopcinski says a couple of years ago

There is no remission for this cancer that I was told why try to fight it?

Reply
    David Emerson says a couple of years ago

    Hi Jeanne-

    Myeloma patients can and do reach remission. The average MM survival is 5-7 years. The challenge is always relapsing from your remission. I believe that newly diagnosed MM patients must pursue both conventional and evidence-based non-conventional MM therapies. I was diagnosed in early 1994 more than 25 years ago.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Wobenzym N - Integrative Therapy for Multiple Myeloma says a couple of years ago

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Multiple Myeloma, Sex and an Autologous Stem Cell Transplant- PeopleBeatingCancer says 3 years ago

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Ravi M says 3 years ago

thank you to those how have shared their stories of their fight with MM.

David, my father-in-law has just been diagnosed with myeloma. Of the two kidneys, one has shut down and the other is barely working. He is currently being given doses of Chemo with dialysis.

Can you tell me if he is likely at the advanced stage of Myeloma, or is he on his way to fighting it?

The wrench in his battle is that he is in Tenerife, Spain. Can you direct me to resources in Europe that would be able to help him in his plight?

Reply
    David Emerson says 3 years ago

    Hi Ravi-
    I am sorry to read about your FIL. Yes, your FIL can certainly return to remission. His oncologist should be able to navigate around your FIL’s kidney issues. For instance, Velcade can help or not using a bisphosphonate as they can damage kidney function. To learn more about MM specialists in Spain, go to the International Myeloma Foundation website. I think they have a list of international MM specialists.

    Good luck,

    David

    Reply
Rob says 3 years ago

I was diagnosed with mm on Sept 19 2017, had a low hemoglobin of 51 started chemo within a couple of days, 61 years of age but feel like 45, I am concerned about receiving chemo and need a way to mitigate the damage it will do to my body, going to princess Margaret hospital in Canada toronto, got to beat this somehow

Reply
    David Emerson says 3 years ago

    Hi Rob-
    I am sorry to learn of your MM diagnosis. The Princess Margaret hospital is an excellent MM center. Several things. Your stage and symptoms at diagnosis will dictate your prognosis and therapy plan. For example, if you have no symptoms and your MM is early stage, you can undergo little coventional therapies (if any) and probably achieve a deep remission.

    Secondly, if your stage and symptoms are more advanced, you can include evidence-based integrative therapies such as curcumin, nutrition and lifestyle therapies which can enhance your chemo while reducing its toxicity.

    Lastly you can consult with a MM specialist who has built a MM practice on low-dose MM therapies. Dr. Berenson is one of the “great eight” MM specialists. My guess is that your oncologist at PMH will work with Dr. Berenson.

    Do you know what your stage was when you were diagnosed (m-epike aka monoclonal protein)? Other than your low hemoglobin, were you experiencing any bone pain or damage? Any kidney damage? I don’t mean to sound nosey. I’m trying to get a handle on your situation.

    Let me know, thanks.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Rob says 3 years ago

I was diagnosed with mm on Sept 19 2017, had a low hemoglobin of 51 started chemo within a couple of days, 61 years of age but feel like 45, I am concerned about receiving chemo and need a way to mitigate the damage it will do to my body, going to princess Margaret hospital in Canada toronto, got to beat this somehow

Reply
Linda says 4 years ago

Hi Dave,

My father had a few test results come back abnormal.

Immunoglobulins IGM 352 (normal range 40-230)

Kappa/lambda light chains, free with ratio, serum 30 (normal 3-19)

Abnormal immunofixation results.

MD sending consult for hematology oncology, a urine test and full body X-ray.

The doctor said it may be nothing still, but curious of your thoughts based on these test values.

Thanks and good to see you longevity in the face of this diagnosis! Congrats!

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Linda-

    I’ve learned the hard way that you and your father are better off waiting until your MD and/or hem/onc. have all the diagnostic testing complete and make a thorough diagnosis. A full body x-ray and 24 hr. urine analysis in particular are useful tests in determining what may be going on inside your dad’s body.

    The fact that you are thinking, learning and asking questions indicates that you and your dad are already ahead of the curve.

    Let me know if you want to talk once your MD and hem. onc. have given their diagnosis.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Mike Palumbo says 4 years ago

I am looking for the list of successful MM physicians and specifically if any are located in the Jacksonville,Florida sres

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Mike-

    The answer to your question about “successful MM physicians” has several levels. The top level, the most successful MM specialists are called the great eight. The list below offers no oncs on the list near Jacksonville Fla.

    The next level of “successful” is a MM specialist. According to research, a hem/onc. who specializes in MM has a better average 5 year survival rate than a regular hem/onc. According to this Mayo listing, this oncologist specializes in MM.
    http://www.mayoclinic.org/biographies/ailawadhi-sikander-m-d/bio-20087330

    While the Mayo Clinic is an excellent MM hospital, I have not heard of or read about this doctor. This doesn’t mean anything. I’m just saying…

    The last thing I can offer is that I read many MMers referring to Moffit in Tampa.

    THE GREAT EIGHT In alphabetical order, our SUPER myeloma specialists.

    Dr. Barlogie – UAMS, Little Rock AR
    Dr. Berenson – IMBCR – Los Angeles,CA
    Dr. Hari – Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI
    Dr. San Miguel – University Hospital, Salamanca, Spain
    Dr. Orlowski – M.D Anderson, Houston, TX
    Dr. Palumbo – University of Torino, Italy
    Dr. Rajkumar – Mayo, Rochester, MN
    Dr. Richardson – Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson

    Reply
      Mike Palumbo says 4 years ago

      Thanks for your help…I have an appointment with Dr. Ailawadhi on 4/11…

      Reply
        David Emerson says 4 years ago

        Good luck Mike. Let me know if you have any questions. David

        Reply
Roy Gill says 4 years ago

Thanks, your information is helpful. I will see if I can find the diagnostic #’s.

RLG

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Let me know Roy. Thanks

    Reply
Robert Le Roy Gill says 4 years ago

I have monoclonal lgG kappa in the gamma fraction. Is this MM? I have an appointment at Mayo in April, but waiting is no fun.

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Robert-

    The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. is a top notch MM and associated blood disorders, institution. Re your question about MM, do you know any of your blood or urine diagnostic work? By this I mean your monoclonal protein aka “m-protein?” The term “IGG” MM indicates where your M-protein is but it is the value of the M-protein that is the important number. For example, a small m-protein means “pre-MM” called MGUS.

    Let me know, thanks.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Nazy Mir says 4 years ago

I have not been diagnosed, but I have been having lots of symptoms and complaining about my body pain, sharp and neddely all over my muscles, bones and in passed I have been diagnosed with lupus arithromathoid, plus Fibromalegia. Recently my exray shows fractures at my back 4 spots up and down my spine. And my osteoporosis is increasing recently like after my complains about my back problems and x-rays I did twice by my physician requesting. Please let me know or contact me if there is any thing beside I have called my specialist, and my physician letting them know my concerns. I appreciate your support

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Nazy-

    I am sorry to read of your health challenges. You are correct. The first step in managing multiple myeloma is a specific diagnosis. Let me know if you are diagnosed with multiple myeloma and what stage of diagnosis.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
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