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Recently Diagnosed or Relapsed? Stop Looking For a Miracle Cure, and Use Evidence-Based Therapies To Enhance Your Treatment and Prolong Your Remission

Multiple Myeloma an incurable disease, but I have spent the last 25 years in remission using a blend of conventional oncology and evidence-based nutrition, supplementation, and lifestyle therapies from peer-reviewed studies that your oncologist probably hasn't told you about.

Click the orange button to the right to learn more about what you can start doing today.

Surviving Coronavirus w/ Multiple Myeloma

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With COVID-19, people who are older (particularly over 70) and people with underlying health conditions… (think multiple myeloma) and cancer appear to be at higher risk for major complications.

Coronavirus (covid-19): What cancer patients need to know, is an informative article written by a top notch cancer hospital, The Hutch. The article is great…as far as it goes. According to the article, multiple myeloma patients undergoing therapy, especially MM patients undergoing an ASCT, are at an increased risk of getting the coronavirus.

This can’t really be surprising to MM patients undergoing therapy. I mean, when I was undergoing my therapy I was cautioned not to eat raw fruits, veggies or sushi…

If you have multiple myeloma, before, during or after therapy, it can help to have some sort of therapy plan thought out,  in case we contract COVID-19. I mean, saying that we live with a higher risk than everyone else doesn’t really help us. Helping us figure out what we can do will help.

What do we do?!?! As a rule I don’t include press releases in my blog posts. I believe that press releases are prone to unreliability of the info that is being written about. I broke my own rule this time because I have blogged about intravenous vitamin C therapy many times previously on PeopleBeatingCancer. I can’t think of much of a downside for MM patients if the press release linked below is somehow inaccurate.

The article below declaring that the Shanghai Government recommending intravenous vitamin C therapy for Coronavirus patients makes sense to me. I am not a board certified M.D. What makes sense to me might not make sense to you.

I have to say however, that intravenous vitamin C therapy has been shown to fight MM as well as several other cancers. According to the Hutch, MM patients generally older, have compromised immune systems and are at a higher risk of contracting the Coronavirus. It seems logical to me then, to learn about possible therapies shown to fight both multiple myeloma and the Coronavirus.

Note to all Multiple Myeloma survivors- as a MM survivor myself I wonder what a “compromised immune system” is. It has been years since I underwent my induction chemo as well as my autologous stem cell transplant.

Am I “immunodeficient?” Is my immune system compromised?

If we are talking about our risk of COVID-19 then we must also consider our risk of any of the 000’s of infectious diseases in our world today. If we try to figure out our risks, we must understand the state of our immune system.

Whew! Surviving MM is one complicated task! Intravenous Vitamin C, Nutrition, Supplementation, Exercise- the list of evidence-based but non-toxic immune-boosting therapies is long and growing.

You have been diagnosed with multiple myeloma? Please scroll down the page to read more about this issue infectious diseases and compromised immune systems.

Intravenous vitamin C therapy is relatively inexpensive, effective and is non-conventional. Meaning your oncologist hasn’t prescribed it for you.

Scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Thanks,

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


Advice for cancer patients, survivors and caregivers on who’s most at risk for COVID-19 and what you can do to stay healthy

“The spread of COVID-19 across the U.S. is looking increasingly likely, even as researchers and public health officials work to distribute information, ramp up testing and enact measures to slow and eventually stop this new coronavirus.

Not everyone will get sick. But like the flu virus, there are definitely people who are more at risk.

With COVID-19, people who are older (particularly over 70) and people with underlying health conditions, such as chronic lung disease (think COPD), cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic kidney disease and cancer appear to be at higher risk for major complications. That includes admission to intensive care and even death…

Who’s most at risk?

“Patients with hematologic [blood] malignancies we believe will have the biggest risk,” he said. “Also, patients who are in active chemotherapy and bone marrow transplant patients. Those are the ones with the most profound immune deficits…”

Are all cancer patients at risk? Or just those currently getting treatment?

Pergam, the medical director of infection prevention at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, said patients with blood malignancies such as…and multiple myeloma are most at risk.

Also at risk: those in active treatment for any type of cancer and those who’ve undergone bone marrow transplants. (Active treatment is usually defined as surgery, radiation, chemotherapy and other treatments such as immunotherapies.)

“The risk extends beyond the period of active treatment,” he said. “The after-effects of treatment don’t end when people finish their last course of therapy or leave the hospital after surgery. The after-effects of cancer and the immunosuppressive effects of treatment can be long term.”

Can patients and survivors get tested to see if they’re immunosuppressed?

Pergam said there’s no easy blood test to check someone’s level of immune suppression, but being in active chemotherapy, having low white-cell or low lymphocyte counts and/or taking immune-suppressive agents (such as prednisone) are all associated with immune suppression and increased risk of infection.

“We don’t know all the details on this yet but if you’ve been told you’re immunosuppressed by your provider, then you should be extra cautious,” he said.”

Shanghai Government Officially Recommends Vitamin C for COVID-19

“The government of Shanghai, China has announced its official recommendation that COVID-19 should be treated with high amounts of intravenous vitamin C. (1) Dosage recommendations vary with severity of illness, from 50 to 200 milligrams per kilogram body weight per day to as much as 200 mg/kg/day…”

New York hospitals treating coronavirus patients with vitamin C

March 24, 2020 | 5:04pm |

“Seriously sick coronavirus patients in New York state’s largest hospital system are being given massive doses of vitamin C — based on promising reports that it’s helped people in hard-hit China, The Post has learned.

Dr. Andrew G. Weber, a pulmonologist and critical-care specialist affiliated with two Northwell Health facilities on Long Island, said his intensive-care patients with the coronavirus immediately receive 1,500 milligrams of intravenous vitamin C.

Identical amounts of the powerful antioxidant are then readministered three or four times a day, he said…

The regimen is based on experimental treatments administered to people with the coronavirus in Shanghai, China, Weber said…

“The patients who received vitamin C did significantly better than those who did not get vitamin C,” he said…


Long-Term Multiple Myeloma Survivor- Compromised Immune System? Coronavirus?

Immunodeficiency or immunocompromise is a state in which the immune system‘s ability to fight infectious disease and cancer is compromised or entirely absent.”

I’m a long-term multiple myeloma survivor who’s currently worried about the coronavirus pandemic. I’ve had an autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT),  lots of different high-dose chemotherapy regimens, radiation, the works.

During the years following my MM diagnosis I occasionally told people that I had a “compromised immune system”  though I didn’t really know what this phrase meant.

This health issue is on my mind these days because of the coronavirus  pandemic.I recently wrote a blog post about MM survivors managing the coronavirus.

The more I thought about it, the more worried I became. According to Wikipedia, the 20-21st centuries are littered with infectious diseases. Not just virus’ but with diseases that are infectious.

I’m rarely sick and can’t remember the last time I had a fever. So my question is, do I have a compromised immune system? Am I at a higher risk of contracting one of the dozens of infectious diseases swirling around the world over the past 20 or so years? If I contract that disease, am I at a higher risk of dying???

The article linked and excerpted below explains how a person’s immune system becomes weakened. Both my cancer, multiple myeloma, as well as conventional oncology, did everything they could to weaken my immune system. B cell deficiency, chemo, glucosteroids, I admit that I am amazed that I’m still alive.

But the fact is, I am cancer-free, my B cells, white and red blood cells, everything has returned to normal. More importantly, I do everything thing listed in the “how do you fix a compromised immune system” article. And I have been for years now.

Please believe me when I tell you that I am not holding myself up as some sort of immuno-superman. I believe that I can catch any/all of the infectious diseases listed in the Wikipedia article. However I do not believe the my risk of infection is any higher than any normal human being. I do not believe my risk of dying is higher than any normal human being.

In short, as I understand it, I am NOT “immunodeficient.” I am not “immunocompromised.” Whew…

Are you a MM patient or survivor? Are you worried about the coronavirus as well? Are you currently undergoing chemotherapy with your white blood cell counts dropping?


Recommended Reading:


I found and watched this short video titled  “Busting Coronavirus Myths”

and decided to add it to this post about our immune systems and the coronavirus because I think the video strikes the right balance of caution (older, MM patients at higher risk) and realism. We are currently worried about the coronavirus (March of 2020) but history shows that infectious diseases are continuous.

In addition I agree with basic non-toxic therapy recommendations such as vitamin D & C, omega-3, selenium, others.

My point in writing this blog post is that once we MM patients/survivors get beyond and heal from chemo, surgery, radiation, ASCT, etc. we must work to re-build our immune systems. And I hope that I’ve done that.

Immunodeficiency

Immunodeficiency or immunocompromise is a state in which the immune system‘s ability to fight infectious disease and cancer is compromised or entirely absent. Most cases of immunodeficiency are acquired (“secondary”) due to extrinsic factors that affect the patient’s immune system. Examples of these extrinsic factors include HIV infection and environmental factors, such as nutrition.[1]

In the clinical setting, the immunosuppression by some drugs, such as steroids, can be either an adverse effect or the intended purpose of the treatment…

Comparison of immunodeficiencies by affected component

B cell deficiency                     Multiple myeloma

T cell deficiency                     Marrow and other transplantation, Cancer chemotherapy, Glucocorticoid therapy

Neutropenia                           Chemotherapy, Bone marrow transplantation

Secondary immunodeficiencies, also known as acquired immunodeficiencies, can result from various immunosuppressive agents, for example, malnutrition, aging, particular medications (e.g., chemotherapy, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, immunosuppressive drugs after organ transplants, glucocorticoids) and environmental toxins like mercury and other heavy metals, pesticides and petrochemicals like styrene, dichlorobenzene, xylene, and ethylphenol.

For medications, the term immunosuppression  generally refers to both beneficial and potential adverse effects of decreasing the function of the immune system, while the term immunodeficiency generally refers solely to the adverse effect of increased risk for infection.

Many specific diseases directly or indirectly cause immunosuppression. This includes many types of cancer, particularly those of the bone marrow and blood cells (leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma), and certain chronic infections…

Smoking, alcoholism and drug abuse also depress immune response…”

Healthy ways to strengthen your immune system
  1. Don’t smoke.
  2. Eat a diet high in fruits and vegetables.
  3. Exercise regularly.
  4. Maintain a healthy weight.
  5. If you drink alcohol, drink only in moderation.
  6. Get adequate sleep.
  7. Take steps to avoid infection, such as washing your hands frequently and cooking meats thoroughly.

 

 

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