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Tag Archives for " pediatric and aya cancer "

Pediatric/AYA Psychological Side Effects

“The results revealed a higher relative risk of psychiatric hospital contact among survivors compared with siblings and matched individuals, and the risk remained elevated in survivors at 50 years

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AYA Cancer Survivors- Psychosocial Care

The delivery of quality health care for adolescent and young adults with cancer and survivors requires an in-depth and comprehensive approach that focuses on the unique psychosocial challenges faced by

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Pediatric Cancer-Cranial Irradiation, Increased Risk of Stroke

“The incidence of neurovascular events in this population is 100-fold higher than in the general pediatric population and cranial irradiation is an important risk factor” I’m going to

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Pediatric Cancer Survivors Increasing, Most Have Morbidities

Reduce Long-Term and Late Stage Side Effects from Pediatric Cancer Therapies Episode 1, Magic Bullets in the Ken Burns documentary “Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies” vividly portrays how

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Can Childhood, AYA Cancer Survivors Heal Frailty, Cognitive Decline?

I am an AYA survivor. I was first diagnosed at 34- pretty old as AYA patients go but I still fall into the AYA category. More importantly, I have lived with long-term and late stage side effects since

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AYA Surviving Stem Cell Transplant- Therapy Plan

“AYA (and Pediatric Survivors) who undergo hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo, auto SCT) are at significant risk for long-term and late effects in survivorship.” Boy, is that an understatement.

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AYA, Childhood Cancer Survivors’ Future Risk of Heart Disease

“About 4.5 percent of the childhood cancer survivors had cardiovascular diseases like heart failure and blood clots in the deep veins of the legs, and most cases occurred before age 40, almost eight

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AYA Survivors Face Real Risk of More Cancer

“...researchers observed what they called “a steep increase” in the incidence of solid tumors among these survivors (AYA) more than 15 years after completion of cancer therapy I don’t know

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