What I wish I knew about Multiple Myeloma treatments 25 years later...

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The Cure for Multiple Myeloma? Exercise

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The Most Cost-Effective, Evidence-Based, Non-Toxic Therapy to Prevent Multiple Myeloma, Prevent a MM Relapse, Prevent Collateral Damage is…Exercise

I’ve written about exercise as a beneficial multiple myeloma (MM) therapy on PeopleBeatingCancer so often I’m afraid that my readers will become tired of the subject. I write about the benefits to MM patients before, during and after therapy so often because I come across research on the subject regularly.

I am both a MM survivor and MM cancer coach. Daily, moderate exercise has helped me remain in complete remission from my incurable cancer blood cancer since 1999.

No other therapy is more effective or cheaper for MM patients and survivors than exercise. And I’m not talking about anything beyond taking a brisk walk around the block (30 min.) each day.

I posted the photo to on the left of this page because I walk with hiking sticks myself. One of my long-term side effects is radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy (RILP). I think my daily moderate exercise is helping me stay out of a wheelchair.

Conventional MM therapy has come a long way since my original MM diagnosis in early 1994. However, conventional oncology still cannot cure multiple myeloma. All MM patients must think outside the conventional MM box when considering their therapy plan.

If you are a newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patient, please, please, please consider evidence-based non-conventional therapies such as exercise, nutrition, supplementation and other lifestyle therapies before, during and after conventional therapies.

For more information about non-conventional cancer therapies scroll down the page, post a question or a comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

thank you,

David Emerson

  • Long-term MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


Exercise

“Proposition: Engaging in physical activity, such as walking, running or recreational sports, can improve cancer survival.

What the science says: The benefits of exercise for both mental and physical health cannot be denied. Since 1996, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended that adults engage in moderate-intensity activities, such as a brisk walk or jog, for at least 30 minutes 5 days a week.[4]

A 2005 prospective, observational study, which followed almost 3000 women diagnosed with nonmetastatic breast cancer, found that those who engaged in moderate physical activity — equivalent to walking 3-5 hours each week at a modest pace — significantly lowered their risk of dying from breast cancer compared with their more sedentary peers.[7]

Exercise may also enhance survival for those diagnosed with nonmetastatic colorectal cancer.[8

Verdict: Confirmed. The evidence showing that regular moderate-to-vigorous exercise improves survival for men and women diagnosed with a range of cancers is compelling.

Exercising Before, During, and After Cancer Treatment

“The emotional and physical toll of a cancer diagnosis is immense, but one of the best things you can do for your physical and mental health leading up to, during and after surgery or treatment is exercise. According to the American Cancer Society (ACS), regular exercise can not only reduce the risk of developing cancer, but can also decrease the odds of its recurring. Exercise helps reduce inflammation, stress and helps keep you at a healthy body weight. It helps change your body chemistry so that it is more difficult for cancer to grow. In fact, being active can decrease your risk by about 23 percent!

The possible benefits of exercise include:

  • Reduced stress and improved mood
  • Improved self confidence
  • Restored movement
  • Alleviated symptoms of Lymphedema
    Greater range of motion, strength and mobility in the affected area
  • Increased energy, reduced fatigue and better sleep
  • Weight control
  • Improved balance and reduced risk of falls and injury
  • Lowered risk for heart disease
  • Subsided nausea…”

 

 

 

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