Reduce Risk of Skin Cancer, Enhance Skin Glow-Whole Body Hyperthermia

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Evidence-based, Non-Toxic Therapies to Repair U.V. Skin Damage, Reduce Your Risk of Skin Cancer While Making Your Skin Look Better- 

I am a long-term cancer survivor and cancer coach who swears by the therapeutic effects of whole-body hyperthermia aka sauna. You probably came to this post wanting to learn more about how to make your skin look better.  According to the article linked and excerpted below, sweating in a sauna makes your skin look better.

To be honest, my focus has never been about glowing skin. I am a cancer survivor who has an increased risk of both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer due to high-dose chemotherapy and radiation. Further, I sat in the sun way too much as a kid/teen. I burned my skin repeatedly.

I had a freckle removed in 2005. The biopsy of the skin was indeterminate. I assume that the freckle was basel cell skin cancer aka non-melanoma skin cancer.

I follow an evidence-based, non-toxic lifestyle to reduce my risks of cancer through nutrition, supplementation, exercise, mind-body therapies and more. Sauna is a great way to detox, exercise my heart, make my skin look better, and relax.

If your focus is learning how to make your skin glow, please consider therapies other than whole-body hyperthermia. Studies show how nutraceuticals, diet and lifestyle therapies can heal sun damaged skin and reduce your risk of skin cancer.

So while whole-body hyperthermia can make your skin look better, you can also lower your blood pressure,  detoxify, improve your circulation, reduce your risk of dementia, and more.

Scroll down the page to ask a question about skin health, heart health, brain health, etc. I will reply to your post ASAP.

Thanks,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

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Is Sweating in an Infrared Sauna Really the Secret to Glowing Skin?

“The future is here: Celebs such as Selena Gomez, LL Cool J, and Gwyneth Paltrow are perfecting their skin and giving their heart the equivalent of a 10-mile run while lying in a warm bed and watching Roku. Really! The treatment is infrared sweating, and while actors, models, and athletes are using it to glow for awards season, it also happens to be built for lazy girls like us who love nothing better than watching movies in a warm bed.

Here’s how it works: The treatment employs FIR infrared heat, a band of radiant energy that has long been used in Japan (known as “Waon therapy”) and shown to help improve cardiovascular conditions. Unlike tanning booths and UV rays, which heat our bodies from the outside in, FIR infrared warms our bodies from the inside—where our muscles and fat are stored—so it doesn’t burn our skin or damage DNA.

Heating our bodies from the inside can trigger a number of responses that come with promising health benefits. For one, FIR infrared heat can make our bodies flush toxins—such as traces of dirt, makeup, pollution, metals, nicotine, and alcohol—more rapidly. Of course, our skin and liver are equipped to detox on their own, but as proponents say, accelerating the process can help provide clear skin faster—something that keeps celebs sweating.

Infrared-induced sweat sessions can also cause the heart rate to quicken, stimulating better oxygen flow. Studies have shown that the treatment can regulate sleep and stimulate blood circulation in human skin, which in turn may help boost collagen production. Finally, the treatment is thought to relieve achy muscles by stimulating the removal of lactic-acid buildup in the body, and may melt fat cells over time.

It all seems too good to be true, so we headed over to Shape House in Los Angeles, where Gomez and Taylor Swift have reportedly been spotted, to try it for ourselves.

We turn up as advised, wearing loose-fitting cotton pants, a long-sleeved shirt, and socks (and looking very much like a member of the Guilty Remnant on “The Leftovers”). If you’re not prepared with the right gear, an attendant will provide suitable clothes in an on-brand shade of shocking orange, a look that screams Litchfield penitentiary….”

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