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Vitamin C as Cancer Therapy

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“Although the use of intravenous vitamin C (IVC) by those with a diagnosis of cancer is considered, by traditional medicine, an ineffective and possibly dangerous therapy, there is accumulating medical research that intravenous vitamin C may improve outcomes”

I take vitamin C daily. I do this to keep my immune system humming along. Even though I believe that vitamin C boosts my immune system, I’ve always wondered about vitamin C killing cancer. Nobel Laureate Linus Pauling touted the cancer killing effects of vitamin C yet he was considered a quack by some.

Is vitamin C cancer therapy?  Linus Pauling said  that vitamin C can kill cancer but what do the studies say?

The study below says that vitamin C in pill form can kill cancer. Vitamin C intravenously (IVC) kills more cancers faster. But as always, the devil is in the details. As the article linked and excerpted below explains, the cancer killing ability of vitamin C, oral or intravenous, hinges on the genetic makeup of your cancer.

If you have been diagnosed with cancer you may want to read the article below. If you have colon or pancreatic cancer you definitely want to read the article below carefully.

Note to colon cancer survivors. Even if your surgeon tells you proudly that “we got it all,” please understand that cancer cells may still be running around inside you. There are a host of antioxidant supplements such as vitamin C that you may want to learn about in an effort to kill those CSC (cancer stem cells) running around your body just waiting to cause more problems.

For more information about managing your cancer long-term, scroll down the page, post a question and I will reply ASAP.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:

Curcumin as Cancer Therapy-Cytotoxic, Integrative and Selective

Curcumin as Evidence-based Non-Conventional Cancer Therapy


PET scans reveal glucose-hungry tumors (here lung masses) that may be susceptible to vitamin C therapy.

“Although the use of intravenous vitamin C by those with a diagnosis of cancer is considered, by traditional medicine, an ineffective and possibly dangerous therapy, there is accumulating medical research that intravenous vitamin C may improve outcomes. A recent medical study evaluating the effect of adding intravenous vitamin C during chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer demonstrated significant benefits…

A recent phase I human trial (2018) published in the medical journal Cancer Research evaluated the effect of intravenous vitamin C and usual traditional therapy on advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The study demonstrated that intravenous vitamin C in combination with the usual chemotherapy (gemcitabine) and radiation therapy almost doubled survival time (21.7 months compared to 12.7 months) and the time of no progression of disease increased threefold compared to their control (13.7 months vs 4.6 months).

In addition, the intravenous vitamin C protected normal cells from the toxic effects of radiation therapy. Their conclusions were that intravenous vitamin C aids in the killing of pancreatic cancer cells and protects normal cells from radiation therapy damage ” … making it an optimal agent …” in the treatment of pancreatic cancer…”

Vitamin C kills tumor cells with hard-to-treat mutation

“Now, a study published online today in Science reports that vitamin C can kill tumor cells that carry a common cancer-causing mutation and—in mice—can curb the growth of tumors with the mutation

Studies by Levine’s group later suggested that the vitamin must be given intravenously to reach doses high enough to kill cancer cells. A few small trials in the past 5 years—for pancreatic and ovarian cancer—hinted that IV vitamin C treatment combined with chemotherapy can extend cancer survival…

Cantley’s lab and collaborators found that large doses of vitamin C did indeed kill cultured colon cancer cells with BRAF or KRAS mutations by raising free radical levels, which in turn inactivate an enzyme needed to metabolize glucose, depriving the cells of energy. Then they gave daily high dose injections—equivalent to a person eating 300 oranges—to mice engineered to develop KRAS-driven colon tumors. The mice developed fewer and smaller colon tumors compared with control mice…

Cancer geneticist Bert Vogelstein of Johns Hopkins University, in whose lab Yun noticed the GLUT1 connection, is excited about vitamin C therapy, not only as a possible treatment for KRAS-mutated colon tumors, which make up about 40% of all colon cancers, but also for pancreatic cancer, a typically lethal cancer driven by KRAS…”

 

 

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