Malignant Melanoma and Sunlamp Use Among People with Acne

The Increased Risk of Melanoma from Sun Lamp Use is Small… So Why Worry? 

The study of melanoma is complicated. When I talk to my teenage son about risks, any kind of risks, his eyes glaze over. After all the kid is smart, young and healthy. Conversely,  I’m both a parent and long-term cancer survivor. My thinking is dominated by worrying about risks. You should have seen me teaching Alex how to drive…

Alex’s  life experience is limited to growing up in an upper middle-class family in the mid-west. Pretty boring…

My guess is that Peter’s (not his real name) first 18 years were similar to my son Alex’s. Peter was my classmate, my teammate and my fraternity brother. Peter had serious acne. So serious was his acne that Peter took Accutane and used a sunlamp daily. None of us thought anything about this because Peter’s dermatologist prescribed both therapies.

Picture of Malignant Melanoma

In 1996, at the age of 36, Peter was diagnosed with malignant melanoma. Being a medical doctor at the time, Peter worked at his cancer therapies. Chemotherapy, radiation and more. And interleukin. Peter puked his guts out on interleukin. He joked about acupuncture. I guess it didn’t help much. Peter used to tell me how good a Big Mac used to taste. I don’t think that Peter’s conventional therapies helped much.

We will never know for certain if Peter’s use of the sun lamp caused his malignant melanoma. But the study linked and excerpted below is enough for me. I understand all too well about cancer risk.


Melanoma at a glance-

  • Risks UV Exposure, HPV, Genetics, Skin Pigment, Moles, Immunosuppression, Previous Skin Cancer Diagnosis, 
  • Symptoms- Mole, Shape (A,B,C,D,E), Itching, Bleeding, 
  • Diagnosis- Visual Inspection, Skin Biopsy, 
  • Prognosis Staging, In-situ, I, II, III, IV,  Five year survival rates
  • Therapy Conventional, Non-Conventional, Integrative, Alternative

I am both a cancer survivor and cancer coach. Have you been diagnosed with melanoma? To learn more about managing this aggressive, complicated cancer, scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Thanks,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Sunlamp use and the risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma: a population-based case-control study in Connecticut, USA.

“The relationship between cutaneous malignant mel. and sunlamp use is examined in a Caucasian population in Connecticut, United States…

The crude odds ratio (OR) for developing malignant melanoma after ever having used sunlamps was 1.30-

Those who used more than one type of sunlamp had a threefold higher risk for melanoma compared to never users…Subgroup analyses showed that sunlamp use was associated with a greater increase in risk for mel. among those who used sunlamps at home…

Conclusion: The current study provides limited evidence that use of sunlamps increases the risk of melanoma…”

 

 

Posted in Skin Cancer Tagged with:

DCIS- Contralateral Breast Cancer Uncommon-Less then 6% Within 10 Years

“Fewer than 6% of women with Ductal Carcinoma In Situ developed contralateral breast cancer within 10 years”

Image result for image of breast cancer

Rational, informed decision-making for breast cancer patients and survivors. Everyone would agree that this is the key to managing any cancer. The challenge for the BC patient is that rational, informed decision-making is almost impossible. It is important to begin all posts about ductal carcinoma in-situ by saying that this diagnosis is not cancer. It is pre-breast cancer.

I wrote a post recently about whole breast radiation in DCIS patients. Yes, this therapy reduces the risk of DCIS recurring in the same breast but doesn’t change the how the survivor lives.

Related image

I also wrote about how early stage BC is affected by tamoxifen, WBR and lumpectomy affect overall survival. 

My problem with many of the breast cancer studies and statistics is that in general, quality-of-life issues are largely minimized. I am a long-term cancer survivor who lives in complete remission from his “incurable cancer.” I live an evidence-based, non-toxic, non-conventional lifestyle that has kept my cancer in complete remission since early 1999.

There are dozens of evidence-based, non-toxic therapies to reduce the risk of breast cancer. Scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Contralateral breast cancer uncommon among women with ductal carcinoma in situ

Fewer than 6% of women with ductal carcinoma in situ developed contralateral breast cancer within 10 years, according to study results presented at the American Society of Breast Surgeons Annual Meeting…

“Overall survival after treatment for Ductal Carcinoma In-Situ is excellent, yet many patients overestimate their risk for local recurrence and for contralateral BC, potentially leading to a decision in favor of bilateral mastectomy…”

Few studies have examined the risk for contralateral BC after DCIS, particularly in women treated with breast-conserving surgery. Further, little data exists on factors associates with contralateral breast cancer following DCIS…”

First breast event — either contralateral BC or ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence, defined as diagnosis of invasive cancer or DCIS — served as the primary outcome

Researchers reported higher cumulative incidence of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence than contralateral breast cancer at 5 years (7.8% vs. 2.8%) and 10 years (14.3% vs. 5.6%)…”

 

Posted in DCIS Tagged with:

DCIS-Radiation Boost Lowers Risk of Relapse But No Change in Overall Survival

Radiation Boost Lowers Risk of IBT Recurrence But Does Not Reduce Overall Survival in Ductal Carcinoma In-Situ aka DCIS

Radiation boost for DCIS patients undergoing whole-breast radiation (WBRT) is the age-old trade off in conventional oncology. Does the patient want to reduce her risk of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence or reduce her risk of side effects?

Image result for image of dcis

I want to be clear about adding a boost of radiation at the end of whole-breast radiation. As the studies linked and excerpted below state, boost therapy does reduce the risk of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence but does not change overall survival statistics. Boost therapy will not help you live longer.

But boost therapy does increase the rate of severe fibrosis.

I am a long-term survivor of a much different kind of cancer called multiple myeloma. Though my cancer is considered to be “incurable” by conventional oncology, there are surprising similarities between DCIS and MM.

I have lived in complete remission from my cancer since 1999 by living an evidence-based, non-toxic, non-conventional lifestyle through supplementation, nutrition, bone health, detoxification and more. 

Have you been diagnosed with either DCIS or early-stage breast cancer? Scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Extra RT Boost in Breast Cancer Has Benefits, But Not on Survival

“And causes of death were similar in nonboost and boost patients for breast cancer (16.8% vs 17.1%), second cancer (3.3% vs 3.5%), and cardiovascular disease (2.4% vs 2.6%).

However, the rate of severe fibrosis was significantly higher in patients who received a boost. At 10, 15, and 20 years the rates were 4.3%, 4.8%, and 5.2%, respectively, in the boost group compared with 1.6%, 1.7%, and 1.8% in the non boost group…”

Radiotherapy boost may reduce ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence in women with DCIS

“Radiotherapy boost after whole-breast radiotherapy led to lower rates of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ, according to results of a retrospective study…

Moran and colleagues analyzed pooled, deidentified patient-level data from 4,131 patients (median age, 56.1 years; range, 24-88) with newly diagnosed DCIS from 10 academic institutions in the United States, Canada and France. Of these patients, 2,661 received a radiotherapy boost (median boost dose, 14 Gy) and 1,470 did not…

Median follow-up was 9 years…

Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence events occurred in 253 patients (6.1%). Of these, 118 (46.6%) were invasive.

Rates of ipsilateral breast tumor RFS were 96.8% at 5 years, 93.6% at 10 years and 90.4% at 15 years.

Patients who received a radiotherapy boost demonstrated higher rates of ipsilateral breast tumor RFS than patients who did not receive a boost at

  • 5 years (97.1% vs. 96.3%),
  • 10 years (94.1% vs. 92.5%) and
  • 15 years (91.6% vs. 88%).

RFS- Relapse-Free Survival

“In cancer, the length of time after primary treatment for a cancer ends that the patient survives without any signs or symptoms of that cancer. In a clinical trial, measuring the RFS is one way to see how well a new treatment works. Also called DFS, disease-free survival, and relapse-free survival.”

Posted in DCIS Tagged with:

For Breast Cancer of Less Than 1 Cm, 93% Survival After 8 Years

Tamoxifen, Breast Radiation and Lumpectomy all Reduce Your Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence- But They Also Cause Side Effects and Secondary Cancer

I admit it. I am a cancer survivor of an “incurable” cancer who looks at breast cancer studies differently than oncologists do. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) conducted an excellent study linked and excerpted below to examine three therapies- lumpectomy, tamoxifen and whole-breast radiation separately and combined for women who have been diagnosed with breast cancers of 1 cm or less.

Illustration Of Breast Cancer Stages

Statistical analysis slice and dice the results below. I have tried to organize and highlight the numbers as best I can. The study concludes that tamoxifen and whole-breast radiation reduce risk of IBTR relapse yet there is no mention, no discussion anywhere of the negative side effects of these therapies.

The one sentence that relates to this issue a tiny bit is “Survival in the three groups was 93%, 94%, and 93%, respectively.” Meaning, the overall survival is about the same regardless. The American Cancer Society lists a number of secondary cancers caused by both tamoxifen and whole-breast radiation. 

I am both a cancer survivor and cancer coach. I have lived in complete remission from my “incurable cancer” by living an evidence-based, non-toxic, anti-cancer lifestyle through nutrition, supplementation, bone health, detoxification and more.

Have you been diagnosed with early stage breast cancer? Scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Tamoxifen, Radiation Therapy, or Both for Prevention of Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence After Lumpectomy in Women With Invasive Breast Cancers of One Centimeter or Less

Purpose: This trial was prompted by uncertainty about the need for breast irradiation after lumpectomy in node-negative women with invasive breast cancers of < 1 cm, by speculation that tamoxifen (TAM) might be as or more effective than radiation therapy (XRT) in reducing the rate of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) in such women, and by the thesis that both modalities might be more effective than either alone…

After lumpectomy, 1,009 women were randomly assigned to TAM (n 􏰀 336), XRT and placebo (n 􏰀 336), or XRT and TAM (n 􏰀 337). Rates of IBTR, distant recurrence, and contralateral breast cancer (CBC) were among the end points for analysis

Cumulative incidence of IBTR through 8 years was

  • 16.5% with TAM, (tamoxifen)
  • 9.3% with XRT (radiation) and placebo, and
  • 2.8% with XRT and TAM (both rad. and tamoxifen)

XRT reduced IBTR below the level achieved with TAM alone, regardless of estrogen receptor (ER) status. Distant treatment failures were infrequent and not significantly different among the groups (P 􏰀 .28). When TAM-treated women were compared with those who received XRT and placebo, there was a significant reduction in CBC…

Survival in the three groups was 93%, 94%, and 93%, respectively.

Conclusion: In women with tumors < 1 cm, IBTR occurs with enough frequency after lumpectomy to justify considering XRT, regardless of tumor ER status, and TAM plus XRT when tumors are ER positive.

Posted in Newly Diagnosed Tagged with:

Advanced Pancreatic Cancer- “High Rates of Tumor Shrinkage”

“High Rates of Tumor Shrinkage” is a Great First Step for Advance Pancreatic Cancer Patients-But Only a First Step-

There are real, measurable positive results for pancreatic cancer patients in the study linked and excerpted below. But like all studies, a careful study of the facts must be applied.

First and foremost, adding a toxic chemo regimen to two other toxic chemo regimens may cause a great deal of collateral damage aka side effects. In order to minimize this toxicity, consider both integrative and complementary therapies shown to reduce collateral damage and enhancing the efficacy of chemotherapy.

Related image

Further,

  • both of the studies below are small-
  • both of the studies compare their results to current standard-of-care for pancreatic cancer- a low bar
  • neither of the studies combine conventional therapies such as radiation and or surgery- they are not designed to…

As you probably know, conventional therapies have limited efficacy on pancreatic cancer. There are evidence-based, non-conventional therapies for pancreatic cancer that are cytotoxic to PC individually and/or work synergistically with conventional therapies.

I am a cancer survivor and cancer coach. Though my cancer is very different from pancreatic cancer, it is considered incurable by conventional oncology. 20 plus years of experience has taught me that conventional oncology can be limited when it comes to certain cancers. I learned to think outside the conventional oncology  box.

Have you been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer? What stage? Scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

High rate of tumor shrinkage among pancreatic cancer patients

“Adding cisplatin to standard gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel drug treatment provided a very high rate of tumor shrinkage for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer…

These statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements in overall response and survival rates resulted from a phase Ib/II clinical study

“After just three treatment cycles, we saw tumor markers plummet and some patients’ tumors shrink significantly in just nine weeks…”

After treatment, two patients had no evidence of disease and are alive over three years after starting this regimen. This is very rare with traditional chemotherapy…”

Of the 24 evaluable patients (those whose response to a treatment could be measured because enough information was collected) who were enrolled in the study:

  • Eleven patients are still alive. The median overall survival rate of 16.5 months exceeds the historical average survival of six-12 months with standard chemotherapy.
  • Seventeen of 24 patients — 71 percent — had a reduction in tumor size of at least 30 percent.
  • Two of those 17 patients had a complete response — no detectable tumor.”

A modified regimen of biweekly gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer is both tolerable and effective: a retrospective analysis

“Treatment with nab-paclitaxel with gemcitabine demonstrates a survival advantage when compared with single-agent gemcitabine. However, the combination is associated with significant toxicities, leading to a high rate of drug discontinuation. We implemented a modified regimen of gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel (mGNabP) in an attempt to minimize toxicities while maintaining efficacy

A modified regimen of biweekly nab-paclitaxel with gemcitabine is associated with a lower cost, acceptable toxicity profile and appears to be relatively effective in pancreatic cancer…”

Protein-bound paclitaxel

Protein-bound paclitaxel, also known as nanoparticle albumin–bound paclitaxel or nab-paclitaxel, is an injectableformulation of paclitaxel used to treat breast cancer, lung cancer and pancreatic cancer, among others… In this formulation, paclitaxel is bonded to albumin as a delivery vehicle.[4] It is manufactured and sold in the United States… where it is designated as an orphan drug as first-line treatment, in combination with gemcitabine, for the orphan disease “metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas.”[5]

 

Posted in integrative therapy Tagged with:

Skin Cancer Diagnosis “Frequently Challenging…”

“Accurate clinical and histopathological analysis of pigmented skin lesions is difficult even for experts”…Really?

Skin Cancer can be difficult to diagnose. As the illustration below indicates skin cancer, its causes, therapies, risks, etc. is complicated. So people with moles, freckles, spots, etc. rely on their dermatologists to properly diagnose skin cancer from non-skin cancer, melanoma from non-melanoma.

Skin Cancer Mind Map

Guess what? Dermatologist rely on pathologists who often disagree on what is an isn’t cancer.

Pathologists disagree on many different types and stages of cancer. It is no surprise then, to read an article about a gene test that improves the diagnosing of different types of skin cancers.

The solution? First and foremost, go to a dermatologist who is experienced with a dreamscape. Step #2 is to have your dermatologist use the gene test discussed below.

I am a cancer survivor and cancer coach. I have watched early stage breast and prostate cancer survivor benefit from similar gene tests. Patients need all the information they can get. Gene tests that indicate the type and stage of skin cancer is another important piece of the puzzle.

The third and final step is to add evidence-based, non-toxic nutrition, supplementation and lifestyle therapies into your day in order to reduce your risks of melanoma.

Have you been diagnosed with skin cancer- melanoma or non-melanoma? Scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP. 

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Noninvasive 2-Gene Test Helps Distinguish Melanoma From Nonmelanoma

“A new 2-gene pigmented lesion test that classifies skin lesions as melanoma or nonmelanoma could help with diagnostic challenges physicians frequently face with the visual image and pattern recognition approach

Accurate clinical and histopathological analysis of pigmented skin lesions is difficult even for experts. Accurate, noninvasive diagnostic techniques could help in skin cancer diagnoses…

This 2-gene approach with LINC00518 and/or PRAME detection distinguished melanoma from nonmelanoma with 91% sensitivity and 69% specificity…”

Posted in Skin Cancer Tagged with:

Melanoma Diagnosis? Use Every Therapy At Your Disposal-

“However, once melanoma spreads, there is still basically no effective treatment at this point.” Therefore early detection is key

The solution then is to reduce your risk of skin cancer. Make no mistake. Skin cancer is complicated.

Click the image below to enlarge-

Skin Cancer Mind Map

As you can see from the illustration to the left, melanoma risks, therapies, etc. are complicated as well.

Surviving a different incurable cancer since 1994 has taught me that patients diagnosed with aggressive cancers must rely on both conventional (FDA approved) and evidence-based, non-conventional therapies to manage their cancer.

Nutrition, supplementation, bone health, detoxification- all evidence-based therapies that research shows can kill your cancer.

 

Have you been diagnosed with melanoma? Has your melanoma spread or become metastatic? Scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Thanks,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

New vistas in skin cancer care

” “However, once melanoma spreads, there is still basically no effective treatment at this point.””

MyPath (Myriad Genetics Inc.) is a genetic test that was recently released to profile 23 genes.

“The degree of expression of these genes helps to differentiate whether the lesion is melanoma or benign,” Dr. Rigel says.

Dr. Rigel notes that use of the myPath test is increasing because it allows pathologists to make a more definite diagnosis of melanoma in equivocal lesions.

Class I is low risk for metastatic disease, while Class II is high risk.

Similarly, nivolumab and pembrolizumab are two drugs in a new class of biologics that blocks programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1).

“What is particularly exciting about this class of drugs is that after three years of use, the mortality curves appear to flatten, suggesting that we may be approaching a ‘cure’ for those surviving this therapy,” Dr. Rigel says…”

Posted in diagnostic testing, Skin Cancer Tagged with:

Melanoma Epidemic In Older White Men-

Know the A,B,C,D, E’s of Diagnosing Melanoma. Know the Warning Signs. If You Want a Professional to Check Something Out, go see a Dermatologist with a Dermoscope-

At first I was a bit put off by Dr. Forney singling out older white men aka me. I’m white and while I don’t consider myself older, at 58 I think my 18 year old son considers me older.

I have six of the risk factors listed below for melanoma. I got sunburned as a kid repeatedly and I have already had a mole surgically removed from my face though the diagnosis was “indeterminate.” I have pre-skin cancer freckles on my bald head (actinic keratosis) and to be honest, Dr. Forney’s message resonated with me.

There are a host of evidence-based, non-toxic therapies that research has shown can reduce the risk of melanoma. I’m not only talking about wearing a hat. I’m talking about supplementation such as grape seed extract.  According to research some of the evidence-based, non-toxic therapies also repair some or all of the sun damage.

I am a both a cancer survivor and cancer coach. Scroll down the page, post a question or a comment. I will reply to you ASAP.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Melanoma at a glance-

  • Risks UV Exposure, HPV, Genetics, Skin Pigment, Moles, Immunosuppression, Previous Skin Cancer Diagnosis, 
  • Symptoms- Mole, Shape (A,B,C,D,E), Itching, Bleeding, 
  • Diagnosis- Visual Inspection, Skin Biopsy, 
  • Prognosis Staging, In-situ, I, II, III, IV,  Five year survival rates
  • Therapy Conventional, Non-Conventional, Integrative, Alternative

Posted in Skin Cancer Tagged with:

Can Dysplastic Nevi Result in Metastatic Melanoma?

Excision of Dysplastic Nevi is prompted by an uncertain malignancy potential and the fear of undertreating an evolving malignant melanoma (MM)…

Rather than worrying about DN /atypical moles, consider evidence-based, non-toxic, therapies to reduce your risk of skin cancer.

According to the info posted and excerpted below, yes atypical moles are more likely than ordinary moles to become melanoma. So if you identify an atypical mole you may have it removed by your dermatologist.

Picture of Dysplastic Nevi (Atypical Moles)Fine. Problem solved… Maybe. The challenge, according to the Medscape article below, is that pathologists don’t agree on which moles may or may not be at risk for developing into melanoma.

I have six of the melanoma risk factors listed below. My shoulders, chest and upper body look like the photo to the left.


Melanoma at a glance-

  • Risks UV Exposure, HPV, Genetics, Skin Pigment, Moles, Immunosuppression, Previous Skin Cancer Diagnosis, 
  • Symptoms- Mole, Shape (A,B,C,D,E), Itching, Bleeding, 
  • Diagnosis- Visual Inspection, Skin Biopsy, 
  • Prognosis Staging, In-situ, I, II, III, IV,  Five year survival rates
  • Therapy Conventional, Non-Conventional, Integrative, Alternative

I had a mole appear on my face seemingly out of nowhere a few years ago. After watching this mole grow and darken I got nervous and had it removed by my dermatologist. If it returns I will have it re-excised” aka cut it off again. But rather than examine my skin repeatedly I have decided to add evidence-based, non-toxic therapies to my day. Nutrition, supplementation, lifestyle, etc.

I am am both a long-term survivor of an incurable cancer called multiple myeloma and cancer coach. I have learned to rely on multiple evidence-based but non-conventional therapies to manage my blood cancer and possible secondary cancer including melanoma.

Scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Thanks,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Dysplastic nevus

“A dysplastic nevus or atypical mole is a nevus (mole) whose appearance is different from that of common moles. An atypical mole may also be referred to as an

Cancer

According to the National Cancer Institute, researchers have shown that atypical moles are more likely than ordinary moles to develop into a type of skin cancer called melanoma. It is worth noting that the vast majority of atypical moles will never become malignant. However, numerous studies indicate that about half of melanomas arise from atypical moles. Evidence supporting this connection arises from clinical photodocumentation of evolving lesions, patient self-reports of changing lesions, pathology studies showing dysplastic nevi in histologic contiguity with melanoma, and epidemiology studies indicating that about half of individuals affected by melanoma also have atypical moles. Epidemiology studies have also shown that individuals with multiple dysplastic nevi are at much higher risk for developing melanomas…

Are We Overtreating Severely Dysplastic Nevi?

” Dermatopathologists typically use these histopathologic features to grade “gray area” melanocytic neoplasms as mild, moderate, or severe. However, agreement among dermatopathologists is surprisingly low, ranging from 35% to 58%.[1]

Excision of DN is prompted by an uncertain malignancy potential and the fear of undertreating an evolving malignant melanoma (MM), but re-excised DN are rarely upgraded histologically to MM; data show that this happens in 0%-2.7% of cases.[4] In contrast, a consensus has evolved that mildly to moderately DN should be clinically followed rather than excised due to the negligible risk for recurrent or metastatic disease, even in cases with positive margins.[5]

Consistent with the 2015 recommendations by the MPWG, most severely dysplastic nevi (SDN) are re-excised, even when margins are negative. But is this necessary or over treatment?…”

 

Posted in Skin Cancer Tagged with:

Metastatic Melanoma and Angiogenesis

Melanoma Can’t Metastasize (Spread) Without Growing New Blood Vessels (Angiogenesis)- Consider Evidence-Based, Non-Toxic Anti-Angiogenesis

If you have been diagnosed with melanoma your prognosis depends largely on the ability for your cancer to metastasize aka spread. Once tumor cells spread, then then grow. In order for tumors to grow, they need to sprout blood vessels. This concept, angiogenesis, is central to all cancers. Even blood cancers. Metastatic Melanoma (MM) is considered to be incurable by conventional oncology.

Click the image below to enlarge-

Skin Cancer Mind Map

My cancer, myeloma, is also considered to be incurable. I mention this because I have managed my myeloma since my diagnosis in early 1994. While I understand why conventional oncology relies on the FDA for the study and approval of cancer therapies, I also understand that survivors of incurable cancers must look beyond conventional oncology if they are to manage their cancer for the long term.

As you can see from the illustration to the left, skin cancer is complicated. Once melanoma spreads or becomes metastatic the prognosis of the patient worsens.

Though there are few conventional (FDA approved) therapies for the treatment of metastatic melanoma, there are a number of evidence-based, non-toxic therapies that are both anti-angiogenic and which will reduce the risk of skin cancer spreading.

Have you been diagnosed with skin cancer? What therapies have you already undergone or are considering undergoing?

I am both a long-term cancer survivor and cancer coach. Scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

thanks

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Current concepts of metastasis in melanoma

“Abstract-The main cause of death in melanoma patients is widespread metastases. Staging of melanoma is based on the primary tumor thickness, ulceration, lymph node and distant metastases…

It is generally believed that a neoplastic process progresses through several stages: tumor initiation, progression, invasion and then metastasis…

Vessel formation

Formation of new vessels in primary and metastatic tumors is of extreme importance. This is thought to occur through the recapitulation of embryonic vessel formation (i.e., vasculogenic mimicry). This is defined more strictly as endothelial-like features being acquired by tumor cells. The tumor microenvironment, that is, interstitial fluid pressure, pH, cytokines, laminin, collagens, growth factors, nutrients and oxygen, is thought to stimulate angiogenesis through different mechanisms…

With regard to melanoma metastases in other sites, the number of microvessels in melanoma metastases in the brain was lower than the number seen in metastases to the breast or lung, and their diameter was intermediate when compared with these two types of metastases [85]. This finding was unexpected, since brain melanoma metastases are characterized by extremely frequent hemorrhage.

 

Posted in Skin Cancer Tagged with: