MGUS and Fracture Risk-

Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significancer (MGUS) is a blood disorder, not cancer with a higher-risk of bone damage/fractures-

While conventional oncology considers MGUS to be “asymptomatic” as the studies linked and excerpted below explain, many patients experience symptoms such as bone pain and fractures.

My name is David Emerson. I am a long-term myeloma survivor and multiple myeloma cancer coach. I am writing about MGUS for two main reasons. First, because people who are diagnosed with MGUS are often told to “watch and wait.” And second,  22 plus years surviving multiple myeloma has taught me that there are many evidence-based therapies that MGUS/SMM/MM patients can pursue on their own.

Related image

Have you been diagnosed with MGUS? Are you experiencing bone pain? Scroll down the page, post a comment or a question and I will reply to you ASAP.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Fracture risk in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance

“There was a 2.7-fold increase in the risk of axial fractures but no increase in limb fractures…

Altogether, 200 patients experienced 385 fractures. Compared with expected rates in the community, statistically significant increases were seen for fractures at most axial sites, for example, vertebrae

In a multivariate analysis, the independent predictors of any subsequent fracture were

  • age per 10-year increase,
  •  corticosteroid use;
  • greater weight at diagnosis,
  • and IgG monoclonal protein were protective.

Baseline monoclonal protein level, a determinant of myeloma progression, did not predict fracture risk.

Less strength and more fractures for MGUS bones

“In this issue of Blood, Farr et al showed that patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) have increased cortical bone porosity and reduced bone strength,1 conditions that can lead to the increased fracture risk, which has been reported in MGUS patients…

The International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) also suggests bisphosphonates in all MGUS patients with proven osteopenia or osteoporosis.9 Indeed, bisphosphonates increase bone strength through decreasing bone turnover…”

Posted in Newly Diagnosed Tagged with: ,

MGUS Increases the Risk of Blood Clots

Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS)- Asymptomatic, Pre-Myeloma Blood Disorder that can Increase Susceptibility to Deep Vein Thrombosis

Have you been diagnosed with MGUS? Are you experiencing bone pain, nerve pain and/or exhaustion? While monoclonal gammopathy of undermined significance is supposed to be “asymptomatic” meaning it does not come with symptoms, MGUS patients can experience a variety of health problems. Getting a blood clot can be serious.

My name is David Emerson. I am a long-term survivor of a blood cancer called multiple myeloma (MM) and a MM cancer coach. Welcome to PeopleBeatingCancer.

Threatening clots in MGUS and myeloma

“In this issue of Blood, Kristinsson and colleagues report an increased risk of venous and arterial thrombosis in MGUS and multiple myeloma in a population-based study including 18 627 patients with multiple myeloma, 5326 patients with MGUS, and 70 991 controls.1..

Figure1

Thrombosis usually is associated with disruptive symptoms, may lead to a postthrombotic syndrome, and can sometimes become life-threatening (see figure)…

In addition, several other new findings in the MGUS cohort are notable. Thrombosis in MGUS was associated with increased mortality but not with transformation to multiple myeloma. This indicates that the underlying premalignant process activates biological pathways, putting the affected person with MGUS and thrombosis at a higher risk for mortality

Only patients with an IgG or IgA isotype, but not those with an IgM paraproteinemia, were at increased risk for thrombosis.

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

 

 

Posted in non-conventional therapies Tagged with:

MGUS Nerve Pain

Peripheral Neuropathy (PN) as Symptom of Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS)

Have you been diagnosed with Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance? Do your feet hurt aka nerve pain? Please scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply ASAP.

Hi. My name is David Emerson. I am a long-term survivor of multiple myeloma (MM) and a MM cancer coach. My guess is that you have been wondering about both your diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of underdetermined significance as well as a symptom of MGUS called Peripheral Neuropathy (PN).

Suffice to say that MGUS is a little known and less-well understood blood disorder. It is not cancer. It is “pre-cancer.”  And yes, patients can sometimes experience nerve pain. Yes, can lead to a diagnosis of Multiple Myeloma but I’ll get to that later.

Your challenge is that conventional oncology does not treat blood disorders. Your oncologist may have told you to “watch and wait” regarding your MGUS. Your first step then, is to read the studies linked and excerpted below in an effort to understand your condition and then communicate with me about possible evidence-based, non-conventional therapies.

I have remained in complete remission from MM since 1999 by living an evidence-based, non-toxic, anti-MM lifestyle through nutrition, supplementation, bone health, detoxification, and mind-body therapies. I’m telling you this not to introduce you to the virtues of therapies like acupuncture, essential oils or yoga, I am telling you this in an effort to explain how important non-FDA approved therapies can be to MM and MGUS patients.
A woman getting acupuncture treatment.

Neuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance.

” Four statistically significant differences set IgM-MGUS neuropathies apart from IgG-MGUS and IgA-MGUS neuropathies: (1) higher frequency of sensory loss and ataxia, (2) higher frequency of nerve conduction abnormality–10 attributes were significantly worse (none were significantly better), (3) higher frequency of dispersion of the compound muscle action potential, and (4) higher frequency of IgM-MGUS in the MGUS neuropathy cohort than is characteristic of MGUS without neuropathy seen at our institution or than is encountered in epidemiological surveys…”

Polyneuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance: further evidence that IgM-MGUS neuropathies are different than IgG-MGUS.

“We evaluated the clinical characteristics and electromyographic features of 39 patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and neuropathy…

  • 23 had a monoclonal IgM protein
  • 13 had a monoclonal IgG protein
  • 3 had a monoclonal IgA protein

Comparing IgM-MGUS and IgG-MGUS neuropathies, we found the following differences: (1) There was a statistically significant higher frequency of sensory loss in the IgM group. (2) Nine attributes of nerve conduction abnormality were statistically worse in the IgM group, with slowing of conduction velocities and prolonged distal latencies. (3) The frequency of monoclonal IgM was overrepresented in the MGUS neuropathy group…”

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

 

 

Posted in non-conventional therapies, nutrition Tagged with:

MGUS and HPV

What Does It Mean for MGUS and HPV to be “Associated?” Actionable Non-toxic Therapy is What-

The study linked and excerpted below cites a small study of MGUS patients, 70% of whom had the HPV virus reside in their bone marrow.

Have you been diagnosed with MGUS? Please scroll down the page, post a question or a comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Let me be clear. According to my research there is no evidence that HPV causes MGUS or the other way around. I am writing about MGUS and HPV because I am a long-term survivor of multiple myeloma and I had HPV at one time. I say “had” HPV for two reasons. First, this HPV virus is known to resolve on it’s own. Secondly I supplemented with AHCC (see below) to make sure that the HPV virus resolved.

Human papillomavirus infection
Papilloma Virus (HPV) EM.jpg

Based on my experience and research I believe that all stages of pre-multiple myeloma- a single plasmacytoma, MGUS and SMM can all be managed in an effort to prevent a full-blown multiple myeloma diagnosis. In addition, it is clean that HPV can be resolved as well.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Human Papillomavirus Is Associated with Monoclonal Gammopathies of Unknown Significance.

“In the following study, we expanded upon our initial observation by analyzing 14 patients with MGUS…

Among 14 patients with MGUS, HPV sequences have been identified in 10 of the bone marrow biopsies. These results suggest that HPV can reside in the bone marrow of a premalignant lymphoproliferative disease.”

Human papillomavirus infection

HPV infection is caused by a human papillomavirus, a DNA virus from the papillomavirus family, of which over 150 types are known…”

AHCC: Natural Treatment for HPV?

A recent study looked at AHCC as a potential natural treatment for HPV (human papillomavirus). It examined the immune support supplement’s effect on two specific strains of the virus; the researchers concluded that daily dosing of AHCC successfully eradicated the expression of these strains in mice and may have a role in the prevention of HPV-related cancer…”

Posted in Multiple Myeloma Tagged with:

Stem Cells Harvest- Autologous Stem Cell Transplant

Stimulating Your Body’s Production of Stem Cells in Preparation for an Autologous Stem Cell Transplant? Try these Non-Toxic Therapies-

The standard-of-care for healthy newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) patients is to have induction chemotherapy followed by an autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). As the forum post from The Myeloma Beacon indicates, it is not uncommon for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patient to have difficulty harvesting enough stem cells needed for their ASCT.

The advice given by conventional oncology is to have more toxic chemotherapy and maybe this will help the patient produce more stem cells.

I was diagnosed with multiple myeloma in early 1994. I underwent my induction therapy in the Spring of 1995 and Dr. Berger, my oncologist, gave me two rounds of cytoxan chemotherapy to stimulate my body’s production of stem cells.

Related image

Hindsight is 20/20 of course but cytoxan (cyclophosphamide) is very toxic. I developed several short, long-term and late stage side effects from my two cycles of cytoxan. My mantra “If I knew then what I know now…” applies to my cytoxan chemotherapy as well as much of my conventional therapy in 1994, ’95 and ’96.

Rather than the two cycles of cytoxan I wish I had undergone HyperBaric Oxygen Therapy while taking B-complex supplements.

Two articles linked and excerpted below cite healthy therapies for increasing the body’s ability to produce stem cells.

What have I learned about MM over the past 20+ years? Myeloma is about two things 1) symptoms (bone damage, anemia, kidney function, etc.) and 2) side effects from toxic chemotherapy.

Whether you are debating treatment options, currently undergoing treatment and experiencing painful side effects, or trying to figure out how to stay in remission, I want to share what I’ve learned from 22 years of full remission from Multiple Myeloma.

Join me in just a few minutes for a FREE webinar where we will:      

  • Identify the side effects– both short and long term– specific to your chemotherapy or radiation regimen.
  • Learn about what integrative therapies are and how you can use them to optimize the efficacy of your specific chemotherapy while healing short term and long term side effects.
  • Go over the 12 pillars of the Multiple Myeloma Cancer Coaching Program and how they can help you heal.

As a part of the webinar, you will receive two of the 12 cancer coaching guides for FREE as well.

I hope you’ll join me. This information is the culmination of 22 years of my personal journey to achieve and maintain full remission from Multiple Myeloma.

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Difficulty harvesting stem cells

“No stem cells after two days of apheresis. After time (six weeks), tried again with single dose of etoposide followed by GCSF for 13 days. Insufficient peripheral stem cells to even try apheresis or Mozobil…”

Stem cell mobilization by hyperbaric oxygen.

“We conclude that HBO(2) mobilizes stem/progenitor cells by stimulating *NO synthesis.”

Study shows a new role for B-complex vitamins in promoting stem cell proliferation

“Folates can stimulate stem cell proliferation independently of their role as vitamins, according to a new study that used an in vitro culture and animal model system in their findings. Folates, whether supplemental B vitamins or natural folates found in food, are essential for the proper functioning of all cells in the body and are critical to prevent birth defects…”

 

Posted in Newly Diagnosed Tagged with:

Lose Weight, Fight Multiple Myeloma

Lose Weight and Fight Your Multiple Myeloma

You have been diagnosed with MGUS, SMM or Multiple Myeloma (MM). What if you could fight your MM AND loose weight at the same time? According to the studies below, loosing those unwanted pounds can help you achieve complete remission from your multiple myeloma.

As you read about various cancer therapies you will become familiar with the terms “angiogenesis” and “anti-inflammatory.” To begin to think through anti-MM nutrition we need to understand that

Image result for picture of cancer patient exercising

The fact is that common MM chemotherapy regimens such as Revlimid (lenalidomide) Thalidomide (thalidomid) and Velcade (bortezomib) are referred to as angiogenic chemotherapy drugs. While there are no chemotherapy regimens that are designed to make the cancer patient loose weight, as the article linked and excerpted below states, losing weight is a great way to reduce the risk of cancer or a cancer relapse.

I am both a long-term MM survivor and MM cancer coach. I have been living an antiangiogenic and anti-inflammatory lifestyle through nutrition and supplementation for years now. Do you think my losing 20 pounds  since I reached complete remission in 1999 has helped me remain in complete remission?

Whether you are debating treatment options, currently undergoing treatment and experiencing painful side effects, or trying to figure out how to stay in remission, I want to share what I’ve learned from 22 years of full remission from Multiple Myeloma.

 

Join me in just a few minutes for a FREE webinar where we will:      

  • Identify the side effects– both short and long term– specific to your chemotherapy or radiation regimen.
  • Learn about what integrative therapies are and how you can use them to optimize the efficacy of your specific chemotherapy while healing short term and long term side effects.
  • Go over the 12 pillars of the Multiple Myeloma Cancer Coaching Program and how they can help you heal.

As a part of the webinar, you will receive two of the 12 cancer coaching guides for FREE as well.

I hope you’ll join me. This information is the culmination of 22 years of my personal journey to achieve and maintain full remission from Multiple Myeloma.

Have you been diagnosed with multiple myeloma? Do you want to loose weight and put your cancer into complete remission? Scroll down the page, post a question or a comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

As body mass index increases, so does spread of multiple myeloma

“”Once a person with cancer is out of the normal weight category, their BMI is contributing to multiple myeloma growth and progression,” said Katie DeCicco-Skinner, associate professor of biology at American University and lead study author…

With angiogenesis, cancer cells cannot exist without their own blood supply. We also found the amount of blood vessels that developed was directly proportional to a patient’s BMI.”

“We found that fat cells from obese or morbidly obese patients secreted a high amount of inflammatory proteins, which contributed to tumor progression,” DeCicco-Skinner said…

Posted in Multiple Myeloma, Newly Diagnosed, non-conventional therapies, nutrition

Can You Cure Your Multiple Myeloma?

Be Honest. Aren’t We All Wondering if Multiple Myeloma is Curable?

The first thing we need to do is agree on a definition of the word “cure.” Conventional oncology defines a cancer cure if the patient lives five years from diagnosis. I define a cancer cure as not dying of the cancer or health problems resulting from the cancer. Since I have lived well-beyond my diagnosis of multiple myeloma, conventional oncology considers me to be cured of my multiple myeloma.

I don’t consider myself cured of my myeloma. I will consider myself cured if I die of a different disease or of old age years from now.

Do myeloma patients have unrealistic expectations about their future? If they are told that a transplant is “curative” then yes, patients may develop the expectation that they will be cured of their multiple myeloma.

The article linked and excerpted below states that an autologous stem cell “transplant remains to be a curative and reliable strategy…” Yet according to the American Cancer Society, the average life expectancy for MM’s, based on your stage at diagnosis, is 3-5 years. To put it another way, the five-year survival rate for multiple myeloma is 47%.

If I hadn’t been young and “unrealistic” I probably would not have researched and undergone the non-conventional therapies that have kept me alive all these years. Despite the survival statistics I have lived in complete remission from my incurable cancer since 1999.

Whether you are debating treatment options, currently undergoing treatment and experiencing painful side effects, or trying to figure out how to stay in remission, I want to share what I’ve learned from 22 years of full remission from Multiple Myeloma.

Join me in just a few minutes for a FREE webinar where we will:      

Identify the side effects– both short and long term– specific to your chemotherapy or radiation regimen.

Learn about what integrative therapies are and how you can use them to optimize the efficacy of your specific chemotherapy while healing short term and long term side effects.

Go over the 12 pillars of the Multiple Myeloma Cancer Coaching Program and how they can help you heal.

As a part of the webinar, you will receive two of the 12 cancer coaching guides for FREE as well.

I hope you’ll join me. This information is the culmination of 22 years of my personal journey to achieve and maintain full remission from Multiple Myeloma.

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director of PeopleBeatingCancer

Stem Cell Transplant Continues as Main Curative Therapy for Myeloma 

“But even with the FDA approvals of new agents for multiple myeloma and select lymphomas, transplant remains to be a curative and reliable strategy…”

Posted in Multiple Myeloma, Newly Diagnosed Tagged with:

Autologous Stem Cell Transplant Ages Multiple Myeloma

What do “Aged Immune Cells‘ Mean for the long-term Multiple Myeloma Survivor?

I had an Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in 12/95 for the blood cancer that I was diagnosed with in early ’94- multiple myeloma.

I am both a long-term myeloma survivor and myeloma cancer coach. Needless to say the article linked and excerpted below peeked my curiosity. I was interested not only for my own immune health but for my myeloma cancer coaching clients.

While just about everyone under the age of 70 who is diagnosed with multiple myeloma is told that they should have an autologous stem cell transplant, a growing number of myeloma specialists are questioning the pros/cons of transplants.

Two Myeloma Experts Debate Role Of Stem Cell Transplantation In The Treatment Of Multiple Myeloma

“In a recently published article, two myeloma experts discussed the role of autologous stem cell transplantation as an initial line of therapy in myeloma patients…”

I consider the article linked below to be another important reason to question autologous stem cell transplantation for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients.

Image result for picture of autologous stem cell transplant

If you have been diagnosed with Multiple Myeloma and are considering an ASCT, please read the facts below and then continue on to the UPI article below that.

  1. According to the American Cancer Society the average MM survival is 3-5 years depending on stage at diagnosis.
  2. Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation (ASCT) does NOT increase overall survival in MM patients. It extends progression-free survival (PFS). MMers may have a longer remission after a transplant but they do NOT live longer that MMers who do not have an ASCT.
  3. ASCT does age your immune system by as much as 30 years according to the study linked below.

The remission from my ASCT lasted 10 months. It is clear that autologous stem cell transplants have improved since ’95. I admit that some young MMers have enjoyed long remissions from ASCT’s. But every MMer will relapse eventually.

Several years of conventional therapies after my diagnosis led to two remissions, two relapses and “there is nothing more we can do for you. ” My oncologist told me that back in 9/97. I went into complete remission in early 1999.

I have remained in complete remission since ’99 by living an evidence-based, non-toxic, anti-MM lifestyle. While I live with many long-term side effects from my toxic therapies long ago, I think my immune system is working well.

I encourage MM coaching clients to live an evidence-based, non-toxic, anti-MM lifestyle through nutrition, supplementation, bone-health, lifestyle and mind-body therapies.  Maybe the Multiple Myeloma Cancer Coaching program supports aging immune systems like mine.

Whether you are debating treatment options, currently undergoing treatment and experiencing painful side effects, or trying to figure out how to stay in remission, I want to share what I’ve learned from 22 years of full remission from Multiple Myeloma.

Join me in just a few minutes for a FREE webinar where we will:      

Identify the side effects– both short and long term– specific to your chemotherapy or radiation regimen.

Learn about what integrative therapies are and how you can use them to optimize the efficacy of your specific chemotherapy while healing short term and long term side effects.

Go over the 12 pillars of the Multiple Myeloma Cancer Coaching Program and how they can help you heal.

As a part of the webinar, you will receive two of the 12 cancer coaching guides for FREE as well.

I hope you’ll join me. This information is the culmination of 22 years of my personal journey to achieve and maintain full remission from Multiple Myeloma.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director People Beating Cancer

Blood cancer treatment ages immune cells by 30 years, study says

“Researchers at the University of North Carolina found blood cancer patients treated with an autologous stem cell transplant showed elevated levels of expression of messenger RNA comparable to advanced aging, and at levels higher than with other stem cell transplant therapies, according to a study published in the journal EBioMedicine

Stem cell transplants help extend survival time for blood cancer patients, and are delivered in one of two ways: Autologous transplants, taken from stores of a patient’s own stem cells, or allogeneic transplants, which uses stem cells from a donor…

We know that years after a curative transplant, stem cell transplant survivors are at increased risk for blood problems that can occur with aging, such as reduced immunity, increased risk for bone marrow failure, and increased risk of blood cancers. What is important about this work, however, is that it allows us to quantify the effect of stem cell transplant on molecular age…”

“We know that transplant is life-prolonging, and in many cases, it’s life-saving, for many patients with blood cancers and other disorders,” said Dr. William Wood, an associate professor in the UNC School of Medicine’s Division of Hematology and Oncology and lead author of the study. “At the same time, we’re increasingly recognizing that survivors of transplant are at risk for long-term health problems, and so there is interest in determining what markers may exist to help predict risk for long-term health problems, or even in helping choose which patients are best candidates for transplantation…””

Posted in Multiple Myeloma, Newly Diagnosed, non-conventional therapies, nutrition, side effects ID and prevention Tagged with:

Multiple Myeloma Overall Survival Statistics

“Doctor…How long… do I have?” Just Don’t Ask…

My high school statistics teacher taught me the saying “there are lies, damn lies and statistics.” But not even Ms. Schindler could prepare me for the challenges I faced trying to understand Multiple Myeloma Overall Survival Statistics.

The short answer, according to the American Cancer Society, is 3-5 years depending on your stage at diagnosis. Put another way, The 5-year survival rate for people with multiple myeloma is 47%. Your challenge is to figure out how your individual situation effects this average. I will list a few “confounding factors” below.

Image result for photo of statistics

  1. How does age affect overall myeloma survival?
  2. How does the genetic variation of your MM effect your survival?
  3. How does the underreporting of MM deaths affect your survival?

And if all of the above issues aren’t enough to chase you away from trying to figure out how long you may live, don’t forget who is writing this blog post. I was diagnosed in 1994, was told I was end-stage in ’97, reached complete remission in 1999 by taking a quack cancer therapy followed by living an evidence-based, non-toxic, anti-MM regimen through nutrition, supplementation, bone health, lifestyle and mind-body therapies!

Whether you are debating treatment options, currently undergoing treatment and experiencing painful side effects, or trying to figure out how to stay in remission, I want to share what I’ve learned from 22 years of full remission from Multiple Myeloma.

Join me in just a few minutes for a FREE webinar where we will:      

Identify the side effects– both short and long term– specific to your chemotherapy or radiation regimen.

Learn about what integrative therapies are and how you can use them to optimize the efficacy of your specific chemotherapy while healing short term and long term side effects.

Go over the 12 pillars of the Multiple Myeloma Cancer Coaching Program and how they can help you heal.

As a part of the webinar, you will receive two of the 12 cancer coaching guides for FREE as well.

I hope you’ll join me. This information is the culmination of 22 years of my personal journey to achieve and maintain full remission from Multiple Myeloma.

I know this sounds self-serving but you really will benefit by talking to a MM Cancer Coach.

Have you been diagnosed with MM? What stage? Any symptoms? Scroll to the bottom of the page and post a question or a comment. I will reply to you ASAP.

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer
Posted in Multiple Myeloma, Newly Diagnosed, non-conventional therapies

Heavily Treated Multiple Myeloma Patients Have Options

Quad-refractory, Penta-refractory Myeloma patients have options

I am both a long-term multiple myeloma survivor and myeloma cancer coach.  I’ve seen a lot over the years. No matter how many times you relapse always remember that my oncologist told me I was end-stage… in 1997. Multiple Myeloma patients always have options.

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If you have been diagnosed with an incurable blood cancer- multiple myeloma, each remission brings a sense of relief. Relief turns to anxiety when remission becomes relapse. Each remission becomes shorter until nothing more can be done.

However the article linked and excerpted below will bring hope to even the most heavily treated myeloma patient out there.

I have lived in complete remission since ’99 by living an evidence-based, non-toxic, anti-MM lifestyle through nutrition, supplementation, bone health, lifestyle and mind-body therapies. I consider what I do to be a non-toxic take on metronomic cancer therapy or low-dose maintenance therapy such as low-dose Revlimid.

As always, conventional oncology minimizes the impact of side effects in the article below. But if you are quad or penta-refractory MM patient you might not care.

Whether you are debating treatment options, currently undergoing treatment and experiencing painful side effects, or trying to figure out how to stay in remission, I want to share what I’ve learned from 22 years of full remission from Multiple Myeloma.

Join me in just a few minutes for a FREE webinar where we will:      

Identify the side effects– both short and long term– specific to your chemotherapy or radiation regimen.

Learn about what integrative therapies are and how you can use them to optimize the efficacy of your specific chemotherapy while healing short term and long term side effects.

Go over the 12 pillars of the Multiple Myeloma Cancer Coaching Program and how they can help you heal.

As a part of the webinar, you will receive two of the 12 cancer coaching guides for FREE as well.

I hope you’ll join me. This information is the culmination of 22 years of my personal journey to achieve and maintain full remission from Multiple Myeloma.

Do you have multiple myeloma? Have you relapsed? Scroll down the page and write a question or a comment. I will reply to you ASAP.

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

In Heavily Treated Myeloma Patients, Selinexor-Decadron Combo Shows Positive Results

“Patients with quad-refractory disease are those who previously received two proteasome inhibitors: Velcade (bortezomib) and Kyprolis (carfilzomib), and two immunomodulatory agents: Revlimid (lenalidomine) and Pomalyst (pomalidomide). Also, their disease is refractory (does not respond) to at least one treatment of each category, and has progressed after their most recent treatment…

Those with penta-refractory disease are similar to patients with quad-refractory disease but are also refractory to an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody, such as Darzalex (daratumumab) or isatuximab…

Importantly, the study’s overall response rate (ORR) was 20.5 percent, with those with quad-refractory disease having an ORR of 20.8 percent and those with penta-refractory disease showing an ORR of 20 percent…

 

 

Posted in Multiple Myeloma, non-conventional therapies, Survivors Tagged with:
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