Skin Cancer- Is Keratoacanthoma a Distinct Entity or Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

“Under the microscope, keratoacanthoma very closely resembles squamous cell carcinoma-non-melanoma skin cancer. In order to differentiate between the two, almost the entire structure needs to be removed and examined

Dear Cancer Coach:

Picture of Keratoacanthoma (1 of 2)

 I had a growth on my leg that was determined to be keratoacanthoma. A dermatologist cut it out and sent it to pathology. I haven’t received the pathology report myself yet. The dermatologist wants me to get a shot of 5FU instead of Mohs surgery. His comment was he didn’t want it to bite me 10 years down the road. I’m 75 and not sure I’ll be alive 10 years from now. If it isn’t SCC (non-melanoma skin cancer), should I have the 5FU or should I leave it alone? If it is SCC, then what?

Thanks for a reply. Sue


Hi Sue-

Let me ask you a few questions before we settle on your next steps.

1) When you say that your dermatologist “cut it out” are you saying that he/she removed the entire KC? If so the pathologist should be able to make a complete report. A report that you should be able to use to make better decisions.

2) Ask you can read from the bold face below, your decision-making may be influenced by a) KC or SCC b) specific diagnosis based on “the entire structure”

Under the microscope, keratoacanthoma very closely resembles squamous cell carcinoma. In order to differentiate between the two, almost the entire structure needs to be removed and examined. While some pathologists classify KA as a distinct entity and not a malignancy, about 6% of clinical and histological keratoacanthomas do progress to invasive and aggressive squamous cell cancers; some pathologists may label KA as “well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, keratoacanthoma variant”, and prompt definitive surgery may be recommended.[3][4][5][6]”

Finally, your instincts are accurate. 5-FU is chemotherapy and chemotherapy can mean collateral damage. It is difficult for any 75 year old to worry too much about the 10 year picture.

How do you feel about emailing me again once you receive the pathologist’s report?

thanks

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Keratoacanthoma

Keratoacanthoma (KA) is a common low-grade (unlikely to metastasize or invade) skin tumour that is believed to originate from the neck of the hair follicle.[1]

Under the microscope, keratoacanthoma very closely resembles squamous cell carcinoma. In order to differentiate between the two, almost the entire structure needs to be removed and examined. While some pathologists classify KA as a distinct entity and not a malignancy, about 6% of clinical and histological keratoacanthomas do progress to invasive and aggressive squamous cell cancers; some pathologists may label KA as “well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, keratoacanthoma variant”, and prompt definitive surgery may be recommended..

 

 

Posted in Skin Cancer Tagged with:

Synergistic, Integrative Approach to Breast Cancer Chemotherapies

Research cites synergistic effects between non-toxic breast cancer (BC) therapies as well as synergy between non-toxic therapies to enhance conventional chemotherapies

For advanced breast cancer chemotherapy is rarely curative. I don’t mean to sound so pessimistic but cancer survivors with certain cancers at advanced stages must face facts. Therefore it is in our interest to look beyond conventional FDA approved therapies for answers.

Illustration of breast cancer.

The three studies linked and excerpted below suggest some possible solutions to this problem. Integrative therapies can enhance the efficacy of conventional chemotherapy. Non-toxic therapies such as chrysin, silibinin, vitamin D3, omega 3 fatty acids and ATRA can work synergistically together and also enhance the efficacy of conventional chemotherapy.

I am a long-term cancer survivor of an “incurable” cancer called multiple myeloma. Thinking outside the box is the reason why I am writing this blog post more than 20 years after my diagnosis. I am also a cancer coach. I have researched and experienced a great deal about cancer since my diagnosis in 1994.

Scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Thanks

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Synergistic Anticancer Effects of Silibinin and Chrysin in T47D Breast Cancer Cells

“Although several chemotherapeutics have been developed to treat this type of cancer, issues remain such as low survival rates and high reoccurrence after chemotherapy and radiotherapy. To explore a chemopreventive approach to enhancing breast cancer treatment efficacy, the antiproliferative effects of a combination of chrysin and silibinin, two herbal substances, in T47D BC cells were assessed…

Conclusion: The data provide evidence that synergistic antiproliferative effects of Chrysin and Silibinin are linked to the down-regulation of cyclin D1 and hTERT genes, and suggest that their combination may have therapeutic value in treatment of BC.”

Vitamin D enhances omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

“BC is a leading type of cancer in women and generally classified into three subtypes of ER+ /PR+ , HER2+ and triple negative. Both omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and vitamin D3 play positive role in the reduction of breast cancer incidence…

In this study, we show that the combination of ω-3 free fatty acids (ω-3 FFAs) and 1α, 25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3 (VD3 ) dramatically enhances cell apoptosis among three subtypes of BC cell lines. Bcl-2 and total PARP protein levels are decreased in combined treatment MCF-7 and SK-BR-3 cells. Caspase signals play a vital role in cell apoptosis induced by combination…

ω-3 free fatty acids and all-trans retinoic acid synergistically induce growth inhibition of three subtypes of breast cancer cell lines.

“The combined treatment of ω-3 FFAs and ATRA resulted in cell cycle arrest. ω-3 FFAs combined with ATRA synergistically provoked cell apoptosis via the caspase signals but not p53. These findings suggest that combined chemotherapy of ω-3 FFAs with ATRA is beneficial for improvement of ATRA sensitivity in BC cells…”

Posted in integrative therapy, non-conventional therapies Tagged with:

Kill Colon Cancer Stem Cells, Prevent Colon Cancer Relapse?

Colon Cancer (CC) Relapse is Driven by Cancer Stem Cells (CSC)- Grape Seed Extract and Resveritrol Kill CC Stem Cells

As is often the case, the devil is in the details. The study linked and excerpted below is not important because research has shown that a non-toxic, non-conventional therapy kills cancer. That happens all the time. The reason why the study below is so important is because grape seed extract and resveritrol taken together kill colon cancer (CC) stem cells.

If you were diagnosed with CC, underwent surgery to remove the cancer, your surgeon would tell you something like “we got it all!” Hopefully. For the rest of your life your challenge then is to avoid a relapse of your colon cancer. Taking grape seed extract and resveritrol supplements daily could very well help you avoid relapse of your cancer.
The illustration to the left is a cancer stem cell before and after treatment with grape seed compounds.
 I am both a long-term cancer survivor and cancer coach. Experience and years of working with cancer patients and survivors has taught me that CC patients must combine the best of both conventional and evidence-based non-conventional therapies in order to beat their colon cancer.
Please scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.
Thank you,
David Emerson
  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer 

Grape-based compounds kill colon cancer stem cells in mice

“”The combination of resveratrol and grape seed extract is very effective at killing colon cancer cells,…”And what we’re learning is the combination of these compounds is not toxic to healthy cells…”

If successful, the compounds could then be used in a pill to help prevent colon cancer and lessen the recurrence of the disease in colon cancer survivors…

We are particularly interested in targeting stem cells because, according to cancer stem-cell theory, cancerous tumors are driven by cancer stem cells,” said Vanamala. “Cancer stem cells are capable of self-renewal, cellular differentiation and maintain their stem cell-like characteristics even after invasion and metastasis

 

Posted in integrative therapy, non-conventional therapies Tagged with:

Chemotherapy-induced Peripheral Neuropathy-Female Cancer Survivors Beware…

Almost half of female cancer survivors had persistent symptoms of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) for many years after treatment ended

The two immutable truths of cancer survivorship are:

Image result for image of woman off balance

  1. the short, long-term and late stage side effects from chemotherapy and radiation are more severe and longer lasting than what your oncologist tells you
  2. collateral damage (side effects) of treatment can be either prevented or reduced if the patient is proactive

My two favorite illustrations of the truths above are my heart damage and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (nerve damage). I developed chronic A-Fib in the fall of 2010 approximately 15 years after the undergoing the chemotherapy that did the damage. If I knew ahead of time that cytoxan and adiamycin caused heart damage I would have supplemented with omega 3 fatty acids, CoQ10 and vitamin E. Studies have shown these supplements to prevent heart damage from chemo.

While I may not have been able to prevent my CIPN completely I certainly could have reduced the damage done to my lower body.

As the study linked and excerpted below explains almost half of all female  cancer survivors will experience CIPN long after they have completed active therapy.

I am both a long-term cancer survivor and cancer coach. If you are about to undergo chemotherapy my advice is to begin supplementing with preventative antioxidants now.

Please scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Thanks

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Female Cancer Survivors Face Years of Neuropathy

“Almost half of female cancer survivors had persistent symptoms of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) for many years after treatment ended, experiencing functional decline and and high risk of falls regardless of their age, researchers said…

Our findings suggest that CIPN symptoms remain a significant and potentially life-threatening problem for cancer survivors well beyond completion of their chemotherapy and close to the time that many will transition out of oncologic care.

CIPN must be assessed earlier in the clinical pathway, and strategies to limit symptom progression and to improve function must be included in clinical and survivorship care plans…”

 

 

Posted in side effects ID and prevention Tagged with:

Squamous cell Skin Cancer- Combine Conventional with Non-Conventional for higher Cure Rate

A world-first trial has found patients with a type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma can be spared the effects of chemotherapy and treated using surgery and post-operative radiotherapy.

Squamous cell and Basil cell are the two types of non-melanoma skin cancer (SC) that make up the most common diagnosis of cancer in the United States annually. According to the ACS there are more than 3.5 million diagnoses of non-melanoma SC annually.

As you can see from the illustration below there are many ways to increase your risk of non-melanoma SC. The previous standard of care for a diagnosis of squamous cell SC was to surgically removed the SC and then give the patient chemotherapy in order to kill any cancer cells that had spread into the patients system.

The study and article linked and excerpted below cite the fact that chemotherapy does no good at lengthening overall survival (OS) in squamous cell skin cancer patients.

According to the study, squamous cell SC patients should surgically remove the tumor and then undergo local radiation to the affected area.

I am both a cancer survivor and cancer coach. The research into skin cancers has indicated that there are a number of evidence-based non-toxic, non-conventional therapies that patients should consider undergoing after surgery and local radiation for their SC.

Have you been diagnosed with skin cancer? What type? What stage? Please scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

thank you,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer 

Skin cancer: Squamous cell carcinoma trial offers some patients hope of avoiding chemotherapy

“A world-first trial has found patients with a type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma can be spared the effects of chemotherapy and treated using surgery and post-operative radiotherapy

The head of the trial, Professor Sandro Porceddu from the Princess Alexandra Hospital, said initially the addition of chemotherapy to treat this form of skin cancer was to sensitise patients to radiotherapy

But results of the trial revealed there was no difference in cure rates between those that received post-operative radiotherapy and others who were treated using post-operative chemo and radiotherapy

Those on treatment plans without chemotherapy can also suffer side-effects including red skin, a sore throat, fatigue, change in taste and thickening of saliva, but Professor Porceddu said the symptoms are resolved over a six-week period…

Mr Schampers said while the results could be applied to another type of skin cancer called basal cell carcinoma, it would not work for melanomas or other cancers…”

 

 

 

Posted in integrative therapy, non-conventional therapies Tagged with:

Mind-Body Therapy Alters Gene Expression Reducing Risk of Cancer Relapse

People who practice mind-body interventions, such as yoga, meditation and Tai Chi, produce significantly lower amounts of molecules that activate inflammation-causing genes

Related image

I am a long-term survivor of an “incurable” cancer called multiple myeloma. Daily, I ask myself “why me?” While conventional oncology and the majority of cancer survivors like me focus on therapies such as chemo, radiation,  surgery and non-toxic therapies such as nutrition and supplementation the articles linked and excerpted below point to mind-body therapies as a viable therapy to either reduce one’s risk of cancer or reduce one’s risk of relapse.

The answer to “why me” might me because of all of the mind-body therapies that I practice daily, weekly, monthly, etc. My mental health has become my highest priority. While reading the studies below all I could think of was how different my life is today than it was before my cancer diagnosis.

Image result for image of yoga

 

Have you been diagnosed with cancer? If so, what type? What stage? Please scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Thank you,

David Emerson

Cancer Survivor

Cancer Coach

Director PeopleBeatingCancer

What Is the Molecular Signature of Mind–Body Interventions? A Systematic Review of Gene Expression Changes Induced by Meditation and Related Practices

“There is considerable evidence for the effectiveness of mind–body interventions (MBIs) in improving mental and physical health, but the molecular mechanisms of these benefits remain poorly understood…

One hypothesis is that MBIs reverse expression of genes involved in inflammatory reactions that are induced by stress. This systematic review was conducted to examine changes in gene expression that occur after MBIs and to explore how these molecular changes are related to health…

We searched PubMed throughout September 2016 to look for studies that have used gene expression analysis in MBIs (i.e., mindfulness, yoga, Tai Chi, Qigong, relaxation response, and breath regulation). Due to the limited quantity of studies, we included both clinical and non-clinical samples with any type of research design…

Eighteen relevant studies were retrieved and analyzed. Overall, the studies indicate that these practices are associated with a downregulation of nuclear factor kappa B pathway; this is the opposite of the effects of chronic stress on gene expression and suggests that MBI practices may lead to a reduced risk of inflammation-related diseases…

Yoga and meditation reduce the risk of cancer by changing our DNA: Relaxation techniques boost the way our genes protect the body from illness

  • Yoga reduces our production of the molecules that activate inflammation genes
  •   Genes are activated during the ‘fight or flight response’ in stressful situations 
  •   Inflammation is linked to cancer, accelerated ageing and poor mental health
  •   Stress is often long term and has been linked to substantial medical problems

People who practice so-called mind-body interventions (MBI), such as yoga, meditation and Tai Chi, produce significantly lower amounts of molecules that activate inflammation-causing genes, a study review found.

Inflammation has been linked to cancer, accelerated ageing and poor mental health…”

 

Posted in integrative therapy, non-conventional therapies Tagged with:

Chemotherapy Side Effects- Phases of Hair Growth and How to Have Healthier Hair

One of the most common chemotherapy side effects is hair loss. You can learn more about how to have healthier hair…

Image result for image of hair loss from chemotherapy

My name is David Emerson. I am a long-term cancer survivor. I underwent various chemotherapy regimens from the spring of ’95 through a bone marrow transplant in December of the same year. During that time I experienced one of the most common chemotherapy side effects- every strand of my hair fell out- my head, my beard, my eyebrows, everything. Though most of my hair grew back in years after my active chemotherapy I wish I had read the information below.

I spend a lot of time writing about how to prevent or minimize chemotherapy side effects though I have never written one blog post about how to have healthier hair.

I want to thank ScalpMED for promoting the information below.

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Hair loss is a common issue among people fighting against cancer. The different treatments available to cancer patients as well as the medications that need to be taken afterward, all contribute to severe hair loss. You too may be experiencing hair loss as a result of the treatments you take.

You too may be experiencing hair loss as a result of the treatments you take. Worry not because your hair will grow back once the treatments are completed.

There are ways you can slow down the effects of cancer treatment and prevent hair loss. There also steps that can be taken to speed up hair growth and maintain the health of both your hair and the scalp. Before we discuss the best tips you can implement today, we are going to take a closer look at the different phases of hair growth first.

The First Phase of Hair Growth

Your hair goes through three main phases. The first of the hair growth phases is known as the Anagen phase or the growing phase. During this phase, the hair needs sufficient amount of nutrients to grow optimally and healthily. This is the phase where you can influence the rate of growth and the health of your hair the most.

Adjusting your diet is among the first things you need to do to have healthier hair and scalp. Consuming a sufficient amount of antioxidants, omega-3 fatty acid, vitamins, and minerals can speed up hair growth by a whopping 100%. The right nutrients maintain the health of your hair and scalp, reducing cases of hair breakage, split ends, and dryness by a substantial margin.

At the same time, try to adjust your lifestyle and daily routines to accommodate faster and healthy hair growth. Getting enough sleep at night and allowing cells to regenerate effectively will help your hair grow faster and healthier too.

The Catagen Phase

The second phase of the cycle is known as the Catagen phase or the transition phase. The phase lasts for around two weeks. As the name suggests, the transition phase is where your hair transitions from a growth state to a mature state. The hair follicles separate themselves from the blood vessels providing nutrients for effective growth.

After completing the Catagen phase, hair follicles maintain minimum to no connection to blood vessels. Each hair strand will start absorbing nutrients less effectively and will smoothly transition to the next phase of the cycle.

The Telogen Phase

The last phase of the cycle is the Telogen phase, also known as the resting phase. All hair will naturally fall out after several weeks in this phase. However, careful treatments and a healthy scalp can greatly prolong the Telogen phase and prevent sudden hair loss.

The resting phase itself could last for up to six weeks and can be prolonged for several more weeks with careful treatments. At this stage, focusing your attention on the scalp can help prevent hair loss more effectively. It is also worth noting that new strands of hair will already be in their Anagen phase by the time you start seeing natural hair loss.

Posted in non-conventional therapies, side effects ID and prevention Tagged with:

Do Multiple Myeloma Patients Ever Die In Clinical Trials?

If Even One Multiple Myeloma Patient Died As a Result of a Clinical Trial Experimental Chemo Cocktail then it is More Than a “Setback” 

Let me begin by saying that I believe that clinical trials are essential to moving cancer therapy forward. Further, I believe that immunotherapy holds a great deal of promise for cancer patients and finally, I entered a clinical trial during my own autologous stem cell transplant in December of 1995.

New Keytruda image

Understand that my motives in participating in the trial were less than altruistic. I decided to join the clinical trial only because I had an incurable cancer with an average life expectance of 3-5 years and that a medical professional asked for my help. At least I think that the guy who asked me to join the trial was a medical doctor…

My point is that approval of cancer therapies as they are now- the FDA relies on clinical trials in order to approve new therapies- are a mess. That is to say that people have a fundamental problem with clinical trials.

I believe that cancer patients are reluctant to enter clinical trials for the three reasons below.

  1. Cancer patients feel like guinea pigs
  2. Cancer patients feel that they might not get the most effective therapy possible and
  3. The clinical trial therapy might be harmful (kill you).

If it turns out that Keytruda combined with approved myeloma therapies caused the death of one or more myeloma patients then cancer patients will have more reason than ever to not participate in a trial. Ever.

I am both a long-term multiple myeloma patient and myeloma cancer coach. Please watch the free webinar posted on the right of the page. Let me know if you have any questions.

Thanks,

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

In unexpected blow, Merck halts Keytruda myeloma trial enrollment to probe patient deaths

“The streak of positive Keytruda updates had to end somewhere. After an onslaught of upbeat trial results and regulatory news, maker Merck Monday night announced that it was pausing enrollment on a pair of phase 3 multiple myeloma studies of the med to investigate trial deaths

The move, which comes at the recommendation of an independent data monitoring committee, comes after “more reports of death” in the Keytruda groups of studies Keynote-183, which is examining a combo of Keytruda with Celgene’s Pomalyst and dexamethasone in previously treated patients, and Keynote-185, which is marrying Keytruda with Celgene’s Revlimid in certain not-yet-treated patients

Right now, not much else is clear; Merck couldn’t shed light on how many patients have died... And while the dearth of info makes it “difficult to draw meaningful conclusions”…

In a Myeloma Setback, Merck Halts Studies Due to Patient Deaths

“Merck didn’t disclose additional details, other than to say additional pembrolizumab studies continue unchanged. “The analyses need to be conducted,” said spokesperson Pam Eisele. But the news offers a fresh reminder of the unknowns and potential safety perils of combining immunotherapy drugs with other treatments to expand their reach…”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Multiple Myeloma Tagged with:

Conventional Multidisciplinary Treatments for Mesothelioma.

“Individualization of care for each mesothelioma patient is fundamental in choosing the most appropriate treatment. The growing complexity of treatment protocols mandates that MPM patients be referred to specialized Centers..”

Image result for image of hyperthermia for lung cancer

The bottom line is that mesothelioma is an aggressive, complicated cancer. As the first study linked and excerpted below explains each patient must be treated differently. In previous mesothelioma blog posts I have advocated that meso patients see oncologists who specialize in treating mesothelioma.

Having said the above I am quick to add the importance of learning about and adding both integrative and complimentary therapies to your meso treatment.

I am a long-term survivor of a completely different but equally incurable cancer called multiple myeloma. I achieved complete remission (in 1999) from my cancer by searching out evidence-based, non-conventional therapies and I encourage mesothelioma patients to do the same.

If you would like to ask a question or make a comment please scroll down the page, write a post and I will rely to you ASAP.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Induction chemotherapy vs post-operative adjuvant therapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma.

Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive neoplasia. Multidisciplinary treatments, including the association of induction and/or adjuvant therapeutic regimens with surgery, have been reported to give encouraging results. Current therapeutic options are not well standardized yet, especially regarding the best association between surgery and medical treatments

Individualization of care for each patient is fundamental in choosing the most appropriate treatment. The growing complexity of treatment protocols mandates that MPM patients be referred to specialized Centers, in which every component of the interdisciplinary team can provide the necessary expertise and quality of care…”

Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma.

“This paper summarizes the author’s thoughts about the use of cytoreductive surgery combined with intraperitoneal hyperthermic chemotherapy (CS-IPHC) for treatment of peritoneal malignant mesothelioma

It is well known that chemotherapy for mesothelioma is largely unsatisfactory, and measurement of treatment responses can be difficult. Single agent responses are all less than 20% with currently available agents for systemically administered drugs. Multiple drug combinations are typically more toxic, and have yielded little consistent demonstrable benefit with major studies reporting median survivals consistently under a year…

The author’s approach relies on surgery to achieve the following: 1) accurate staging; 2) tumor debulking, as possible, and treatment of mechanical obstruction as well as prevention of impending obstruction by resection or bypass; and 3) preparation for the use of intra-operative hyperthermic chemotherapy perfusion. This approach has been associated with rapid clinical symptom improvement, as well as a reliable and durable resolution of ascites with a single therapy. Morbidity and mortality have been acceptable with about 27-month median survival…”

First-line chemotherapy with pemetrexed plus cisplatin for malignant peritoneal mesothelioma.

“Results- Two complete responses and 9 partial responses were achieved. Overall response rate and disease control rate were 45.8% and 91.7%, respectively. Median progression-free survival and median overall survival were 11.0 months and 15.8 months, respectively…

Conclusions- Systemic pemetrexed plus cisplatin is active for MPeM. Disparity with the outcome of cytoreductive surgery with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS/HIPEC) needs to receive more emphasis, since peritoneal mesothelioma has a 5-year survival rate of 50%…”

 

Posted in non-conventional therapies Tagged with:

Cryotherapy for Early Breast Cancer May Be the Solution to OverTreatment

Many patients with breast cancer have relatively non-aggressive disease, but are overtreated,” especially older women… “The solution is to have a treatment option that provides a solution with very little morbidity,” 

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My mom was diagnosed with DCIS at the age of 75. Mom underwent a lumpectomy, five years of an aromatase inhibitor (tamoxifen) and whole-breast radiation. Mom developed atrial fibrillation about 7-8 years after her WBR. I’ll never know if the radiation caused heart damage and her A-Fib but I will always suspect that my mom was over-treated for her DCIS.

That was in 2005. Skip ahead to today. As the article linked and excerpted below explains cryotherapy/cryosurgery could be a less invasive DCIS therapy with reduced risks of collateral damage such as heart damage. It’s too early to definitively say if women who are diagnosed with early stage breast cancer will benefit from cryotherapy. But I look forward to the day when women have the choice.

Mom was diagnosed with DCIS in the other breast about six months ago (12/16).

I am a cancer survivor and cancer coach. Have you been diagnosed with early stage breast cancer? What therapy are you considering? Scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Cryosurgery: The Future of Breast Cancer Treatment?

“A recently completed study by the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group (ACOSOG) found promising results in 86 patients with breast cancer treated with cryosurgery, but called for further evaluation...

Dr Holmes is the principal investigator for a new trial — FROST (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01992250).2 The sponsor, Sanarus Technologies, based in Pleasanton, California, makes the cryoablation device, the Visica 2 Treatment System, which will be used at 20 participating US sites. The system is cleared by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the ablation or destruction of both cancerous and benign tumors...

Like the earlier ACOSOG trial, FROST, will not be randomized, but contains 2 study arms. One arm will enroll women ages 70 and older whose breast cancers, by virtue of age, are generally considered indolent enough to avoid follow-up radiation or sentinel node biopsy…

Dr Holmes added that the other arm will be women aged 50 to 69 years who will be required to have follow-up radiation to reduce the risk of recurrence. But lymph node surgery will be optional in the younger cohort, as will chemotherapy, if the nodes show further cancer…

Each participant will receive 5 years of hormonal therapy following cryosurgery for control of systemic disease. Maximum tumor size at time of diagnosis is 1.5 centimeters or less. Each participant will be clinically node negative, estrogen receptor–positive, and HER2-neu negative at enrollment — “excellent candidates” for minimally invasive cryosurgery, according to Dr Holmes…

 

 

 

Posted in non-conventional therapies Tagged with:

You can take control of your Multiple Myeloma.

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