Darzelex Increases PFS But Also Increases Collateral Damage in T-I Myeloma Patients?

Patients aged 65 years or older with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma, as well as those who have comorbidities, are ineligible for autologous stem cell transplantation.

Think about it. Adding another chemotherapy to your current chemotherapy regimen for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma will help your progression-free survival (PFS) increase. But adding a chemotherapy to your regimen will also add toxicity. Do you want to add toxicity if:

  • Your new regimen adds to PFS but not OS (overall survival)?
  • Adds toxicity and possibly collateral damage to a newly diagnosed MMer who is transplant-ineligible, older or in poor health?

Please don’t misunderstand me. Achieving complete response and or minimal residual disease-negative status is great. But will the added toxicity add time to your life? Surely more toxicity will decrease your quality-of-life. Will increase your length-of-life?

Consider evidence-based non-toxic therapies shown to be cytotoxic to MM. Follow an anti-MM diet. Learn about evidence-based anti-MM lifestyle therapies.

I am a long-term MM survivor and MM cancer coach. Watch the free webinar linked on the right of this page and let me know if you have any questions.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Addition of daratumumab to chemotherapy doubles PFS in transplant-ineligible newly diagnosed myeloma

“The addition of daratumumab to standard chemotherapy doubled PFS among patients with transplant-ineligible newly diagnosed multiple myeloma, according to late-breaking study results presented at ASH Annual Meeting and Exposition.

Patients who received daratumumab (Darzalex, Janssen) appeared significantly more likely to achieve complete response, and they were more than three times as likely to reach minimal residual disease-negative status…

Patients aged 65 years or older with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma, as well as those who have comorbidities, are ineligible for autologous stem cell transplantation.

A higher percentage of patients assigned daratumumab developed grade 3 or grade 4 infections (23.1% vs. 14.7%), but the percentage of patients who discontinued treatment due to infections was similar between those who received daratumumab-VMP and those who received VMP alone (0.9% vs. 1.4%).

More than one-quarter (27.7%) of patients assigned daratumumab experienced infusion-related reactions. Most (92.7%) occurred during the first infusion, and the majority (95.1%) were grade 1 or grade 2.

Posted in Multiple Myeloma Tagged with:

Feverfew as Multiple Myeloma Therapy

Collectively, parthenolide has multifaceted antitumor effects toward both Multiple Myeloma cells and the bone marrow microenvironment.

Parthenolide aka Feverfew is the trifecta of multiple myeloma therapies. It is cytotoxic to MM, it is cytogenic to drug-resistant MM and feverfew enhances the efficacy of dexamethasone.

After I endured several difficult years of conventional MM therapies from my diagnosis in ’94 until my oncologist told me she could do nothing more for me in 9/97 I became angry at the world of conventional MM oncology vowing to turn newly diagnosed MMers from the horrors of conventional MM treatments.

That was then, this is now. MM is an aggressive and difficult to treat blood cancer. The newly diagnosed MMer will need every possible evidence-based therapy he or she can find.

The studies linked below indicate that feverfew is one of those evidence-based but non-conventional MM therapies that can kill MM on its own but can also enhance the efficacy of a conventional chemo like dexamethasone.

I am both a long-term MM survivor and MM cancer coach. Living with MM since my diagnosis in early ’94 has taught me two things. First MMers always relapse. Second, while I relapsed three times while undergoing conventional therapies I achieved complete remission (CR) while undergoing evidence-based non-conventional therapies. My point is that MMers must learn about non-conventional therapies to manage their MM for the long-term.

Please watch the free webinar linked to the right of the page. I hope to work with you as your MM coach.

Thanks,

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Parthenolide

Parthenolide is a sesquiterpene lactone of the germacranolide class which occurs naturally in the plant feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium), after which it is named. It is found in highest concentration in the flowers and fruit…”

Antimyeloma effects of a sesquiterpene lactone parthenolide.

“Parthenolide inhibited the growth of MM cells lines, including drug-resistant cell lines, and primary cells in a dose-dependent manner…

An additive effect and synergy were observed when parthenolide was combined with dexamethasone and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, respectively.

CONCLUSION: Collectively, parthenolide has multifaceted antitumor effects toward both MM cells and the bone marrow microenvironment. Our data support the clinical development of parthenolide in MM therapy.”

Parthenolide-induced apoptosis in multiple myeloma cells involves reactive oxygen species generation and cell sensitivity depends on catalase activity

“The sesquiterpene lactone, parthenolide (PTL), possesses strong anticancer activity against various cancer cells. We report that PTL strongly induced apoptosis in 4 multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines and primary MM cells (CD38+ high), but barely induced death in normal lymphocytes (CD38−/+low)…
Among 4 MM cell lines, there is considerable difference in susceptibility to PTL. KMM-1 and MM1S cells sensitive to PTL possess less catalase activity than the less sensitive KMS-5 and NCI-H929 cells as well as normal lymphocytes. A catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole enhanced their PTL-mediated ROS generation and cell death. The siRNA-mediated knockdown of catalase in KMS-5 cells decreased its activity and sensitized them to PTL.
Our findings indicate that PTL induced apoptosis in MM cells depends on increased ROS and intracellular catalase activity is a crucial determinant of their sensitivity to PTL.” 
Posted in integrative therapy, Multiple Myeloma, non-conventional therapies

Non-Conventional Multiple Myeloma Therapy- Arsenic Trioxide

The results of this small trial support further investigation of this novel drug for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory Multiple Myeloma.

Conventional oncology has gotten very adept at putting newly diagnosed multiple myeloma into remission. If you are diagnosed at any stage of MM beyond the earliest of early MM, my experience is that your first priority is to get your MM under control.  Years or even months of conventional MM therapies will lead to common side effects such as CIPN, DVT’s, and others. Some side effects will heal some will not.

The ultimate challenge for the long-term MM survivor is to identify evidence-based, non-conventional therapies such as arsenic trioxide that can balance the toxicity, cost and collateral damage of conventional chemotherapies.  Combined with evidence-based supplementation, nutrition, and integrative therapies you can manage your MM (as I have) for years.

I am both a MM survivor and MM cancer coach. Aggressive conventional MM therapies such as induction chemotherapy and an autologous stem cell transplant did little for me beyond giving me short, long-term and late-stage side effects. And my oncologist telling me that she could do nothing more for me after about 3 years…

MM management is not an either/or proposition. I have learned that long-term MMers must use the full spectrum of available MM therapies, both conventional and non-conventional.

Please watch the free webinar linked on the right of the page. Let me know if you have any questions or comments. I look forward to working with you.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Clinical activity of arsenic trioxide for the treatment of multiple myeloma.

“Arsenic has been used since ancient times as a therapeutic agent. However, until recently its use in modern medicine has been restricted to the treatment of a limited number of parasitic infections.

Investigations of this agent have demonstrated that its efficacy in APL and preclinical tumor models is dependent upon a number of mechanisms, including induction of apoptosis, effects on cellular differentiation, cell cycling, and tumor angiogenesis. Subsequent preclinical studies showed the significant activity of arsenic trioxide in multiple myeloma (MM).

Based on this, in a phase II trial, we have evaluated the activity of arsenic trioxide in 14 patients with relapsed MM, refractory to conventional salvage therapy. With the dose and schedule used, treatment with arsenic trioxide produced responses in three patients and prolonged stable disease in a fourth patient, with the longest response lasting 6 weeks. Although treatment was reasonably well tolerated, in these patients with extensive prior therapy, 11 developed cytopenia, five associated with infectious complications and three developed deep vein thromboses. The results of this small trial support further investigation of this novel drug for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory MM.”

Arsenic trioxide: new clinical experience with an old medication in hematologic malignancies.

“Arsenic trioxide has shown great promise in the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). In clinical trials, arsenic trioxide induces complete remission in 87% of patients and molecular remission in 83% of patients. Two-year overall and relapse-free survival estimates are 63% and 49%, respectively. Treatment with arsenic trioxide may be associated with the APL differentiation syndrome, leukocytosis, and electrocardiographic abnormalities. The expanded use of arsenic trioxide in APL for postremission therapy, in conjunction with transplantation, and in patients with newly diagnosed APL is under investigation. The multiple mechanisms of action of arsenic trioxide suggest that it may have antitumor activity in malignancies other than APL and that it may be used in combination with other agents to expand its potential use.

 

Posted in integrative therapy, Multiple Myeloma

Healthy Diet/Nutrition-Before, During and After Therapy Cancer- Survivor/Cancer Coaching

Cancer Coaching Rule #1- “All of these rules (below) are subtly trying to get you to be more conscious of what you’re eating. It’s far too easy these days to consume more than you think you are or more than you really need”

One of the most popular blog posts on PBC and one of the most frequently asked cancer coaching questions I face is what diet cancer patients and survivors should follow. Interestingly, of all of the therapies I have studied and written about since my diagnosis in 1994, nutrition for the cancer patient has been the most difficult for two reasons.

Ed.Note- according to the best selling author Michael Ruhlman we should talk about “nutritious” foods, not foods that are “healthy.” Regardless, the cancer patient/survivors food manifesto is Michael’s book “Grocery: The Buying and Selling of Food in America.”

Nutrition is rarely studied in a rigorous way. The disagreement among nutritionists demonstrated in the first article below is a good example of this lack of research on the subject. More importantly, I, we- cancer patients and survivors are human. None of us can follow a strict set of dietary rules for years. At least I can’t. The articles linked below offer general rules and guidelines. When I look back on my own cancer survival since ’94, I have followed general nutritional guidelines myself. Especially as the rules have changed. When I was first diagnosed I read that coffee was bad for you so I stopped drinking coffee. Now coffee (3-4 cups a day) is good for you.

I love hummus so I can fill the fridge with this “healthy” food. But quinoa? Not so much. I eat this superfood only when my wife finds a recipe that can mix quinoa with other foods to disguise this dry, bland grain.  And as for alcohol, don’t kid yourself. Regular people rate wine as being unhealthy because they know that moderation is a difficult goal. I know few people who can stick to one glass a day.

The point of all this is that done right, nutrition should be one of the easiest and most enjoyable therapies for cancer patients and survivors to include in their regimen.

Please scroll down the page and ask a question or leave a comment.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Is Sushi ‘Healthy’? What About Granola? Where Americans and Nutritionists Disagree

“We surveyed Americans and a panel of nutrition experts about which foods they thought were good or bad for you….

Is popcorn good for you? What about pizza, orange juice or sushi? Or frozen yogurt, pork chops or quinoa?

Which foods are healthy? In principle, it’s a simple enough question, and a person who wishes to eat more healthily should reasonably expect to know which foods to choose at the supermarket and which to avoid.

Unfortunately, the answer is anything but simple…

Of the 52 common foods that we asked experts and the public to rate, none had a wider gap than granola bars. More than 70 percent of ordinary Americans we surveyed described it as healthy, but less than a third of nutritional experts did. A similar gap existed for granola, which less than half of nutritionists we surveyed described as healthy…

Foods considered healthier by experts than by the public
Percent describing a food as “healthy” Nutritionists Public Difference
Quinoa 89% 58%
31
Tofu 85% 57%
28
Sushi 75% 49%
26
Hummus 90% 66%
24
Wine 70% 52%
18
Shrimp 85% 69%
16

 

Simple Rules for Healthy Eating

  1. Get as much of your nutrition as possible from a variety of completely unprocessed foods.
  2.  Eat lightly processed foods less often.
  3. Eat heavily processed foods even less often.
  4.  Eat as much home-cooked food as possible, which should be prepared according to Rule 1
  5.  Use salt and fats, including butter and oil, as needed in food preparation.
  6. When you do eat out, try to eat at restaurants that follow the same rules.
  7.  Drink mostly water, but some alcohol, coffee and other beverages are fine.
  8. Eat with other people, especially people you care about, as often as possible.

I’ve avoided treating any food like the devil. Many nutrition experts do, and it may turn out they’re right, but at this point I think the jury is still out. I’ve therefore tried not to tell you to avoid anything completely. My experience tells me that total abstinence rarely works, although anecdotes exist to support that practice. I think you’ll find that many other diets and recommendations work under these rules. These are much more flexible and, I hope, reasonable than what some might prescribe.

All of these rules are subtly trying to get you to be more conscious of what you’re eating. It’s far too easy these days to consume more than you think you are, or more than you really need, especially when eating out. I’ve found that it’s impossible to tell any one person how much they should be eating…”

Grocery: The Buying and Selling of Food in America


Kindle Edition: Check Amazon for Pricing Digital Only

Posted in cancer, non-conventional therapies, nutrition Tagged with:

Renal Cell Cancer Coaching- Slow Growing Relapse on Lungs-

My oncologist thinks treatment won’t begin for 12-18 months. I am pretty much in shock as my oncologist indicated a maximum 10-year prognosis for my renal cell carcinoma once he starts treatment.

Dear Cancer Coach-I had a kidney removed in February of this year due to papillary cell renal cell carcinoma. I was just told that my kidney cancer had metastasized (spread)  to my lungs.

The nodules are too small to biopsy right now but it appears to be slow growing. My oncologist thinks treatment won’t begin for 12-18 months. I am pretty much in shock as my oncologist indicated a maximum 10 year prognosis once he starts treatment.

I’m 63 yearrs old now and I feel like time is closing in on me. I have no idea how to deal with this diagnosis. Can you give me some suggestions? John


Dear John- I am sorry to learn of your RCC diagnosis. I understand the shock of a cancer diagnosis or of a metastatic cancer diagnosis, however, you have a number of factors in your favor. Read the info below with the understanding that in my own conventional cancer therapy of chemotherapy/radiation/surgery did little for me other than give me several short, long-term and late-stage side effects.

It was the pursuit of non-toxic therapies coupled with lifestyle therapies that put me into complete remission where I remain today. Being told that a cancer is incurable (as my cancer is, multiple myeloma) is depressing to be sure. But keep in mind that this statement only means that the oncologist sitting across from you doesn’t know how to treat your cancer for the long term.

Take a deep breath and begin learning about those therapies that are available to you.

First and foremost “small, slow-growing” nodules is a positive. While conventional therapies might help you manage your cancer, you can use the 12-18 months to learn about and pursue non-toxic therapies. As the studies linked below indicate, there are numerous antioxidant supplements that show evidence-based kidney killing ability. Further, all of the antioxidants discussed below are low-cost and can be purchased through Amazon. I buy all my supplements online…

I take all below though at a lower maintenance dose as I have been taking them for years now.

“Renal cell carcinoma”

“The greatest risk factors for RCC are lifestyle-related; smoking, obesity, and hypertension (high blood pressure) have been estimated to account for up to 50% of cases…

Another suspected risk factor is the long-term use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).[17]”

Please consider quitting smoking if you do. Consider frequent, moderate exercise which over time may help you lose weight and lower your blood pressure. I don’t know what your job is but if you coming in contact with the chemicals listed above figure out how to avoid them.

My general point is that exercise, lifestyle, environment, etc. may slow or even reverse your RCC. I’m big on plan B thinking. If you do need chemo someday, you will be “pre-habilitated.” Meaning, you will be in better physical condition and therefore will handle chemo better.

Curcumin Promotes Cell Cycle Arrest and Inhibits Survival of Human Renal Cancer Cells by Negative Modulation of the PI3K/AKT Signaling Pathway.

” In conclusion, our results demonstrate that curcumin exerts anti-cancer effects by negative modulation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway and may represent a promising new drug to treat RCC.”

Please let me know if you have any questions about any of the information above.

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer
Posted in cancer, integrative therapy, Uncategorized Tagged with:

Completed Auto Stem Cell Transplant for Myeloma- What about Curcumin, EGCG, Resveritrol, Etc.

The bone healing has been the most difficult part of my myeloma diagnosis with fractures in the spine. Otherwise, I am active, biking, walking and working. Have not and will not do radiation.

Thank you for sharing your incredible wealth of knowledge. I am 1 year out of an autologous stem cell transplant for Multiple Myeloma and would like to know the brand and dosage of curcumin, resveratrol, green tea extract and omega 3 fatty acids you advise and anything else important for MM to help me maintain as long a remission as I can.

The bone healing has been the most difficult part with fractures in the spine. Otherwise, I am active, biking, walking and working. Have not and will not do radiation.

All the Best, Jill


Hi Jill-
I am sorry to read of your MM but I am encouraged by your desire to make an effort to remain in remission. To answer your question “would like to know the dosage of Curcumin, resveratrol, green tea extract and omega’s you advise…” Several things.

First off, I have been in complete remission from MM since ’99 and supplementing with those you mention for years now. I take a maintenance dose of each. By this, I mean that I take even less than the doses recommended on the labels of each. I take a brand called Life Extension Foundation of each of the supplements you asked about. Further, I have linked a guide about anti-MM supplements below.

I have read both studies and personal accounts of MMers taking up to 8 grams of curcumin (1000 mg is 1 gram). I know of one MMer who is taking 2 grams of resveratrol. Further, omega 3 fatty acids can thin one’s blood. Those MMers also taking prescription blood thinners such as coumadin must work with their oncologist to supplement with omega 3 fatty acids.

Lastly, while the evidence is spotty, there is reason to believe that certain supplements work synergistically with each other. Therefore it is difficult for me to advise doses for you. I would recommend you seeing a naturopath to work with who might be able to counsel you on this issue.

As for additional lifestyle MM therapies I recommend frequent but moderate exercise. My leg function is limited so I spend 30 min. on an elliptical 3 days a week and do light lifting the other three days a week. When I say light I mean light. The weight bearing aspect of this activity should help you manage your bone health, healing, etc. But since you are active as you say you probably know more about this than I do.

I am conflicted about my own local radiation. Yes, local radiation did cause long-term side effects (radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy). But local radiation also bought me about a year during with I pursued other MM therapies. I hope you never have to decide…

To learn more about evidence-based bone health supplements

To learn more about evidence-based anti- MM supplements 

My diet is based on this TED Talk by Dr. Bill Li

Let me know if you have any other questions and good luck Joan.

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer
Posted in Multiple Myeloma, non-conventional therapies, nutrition, side effects ID and prevention Tagged with:

Mantle Cell Lymphoma- Lenalidomide, Rituxan plus Integrative Therapies

“Lenalidomide (Revlimid) plus rituximab (Rituxan) is a feasible combination that is also safe and active, as initial and maintenance therapy for patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL)”

The article linked below could be talking about a blood cancer called multiple myeloma as easily as it is talking about mantle cell lymphoma.

Both blood cancers affect the same age group (65-70), both blood cancers have a five-year survival rate of 48%-50% and according to the article below both blood cancers respond to lenalidomide aka Revlimid. Autologous stem cell transplantation is also a common therapy for each cancer.

Which is why the study below caught my eye. I am both a long-term MM survivor and cancer coach. Study after study for these two blood cancers plays down the importance of collateral damage aka side effects. Not only do I live with a host of side effects incurred during my years of conventional therapies, I have remained in CR from my MM by living an evidence-based, non-toxic, anti-MM lifestyle.

I’m not saying that the newly diagnosed CML patient should ignore conventional (FDA approved) therapies. I am saying that nutrition, supplementation, and lifestyle can enhance chemotherapy while moderating toxicity.

Please watch the free webinar linked on the right side of this page. If you have any questions or comments please scroll down the page and post a question or comment. I will reply to you ASAP.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • Cancer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Lenalidomide Plus Rituximab Safe and Effective as Initial Treatment for MCL 

“Lenalidomide (Revlimid) plus rituximab (Rituxan) is a feasible combination that is also safe and active, as initial and maintenance therapy for patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL),..

Patients treated with the agents saw a high rate of complete responses (64% CR, 92% overall response) and patients were able to achieve minimal residual disease (MRD) negativity with durable remissions beyond 4 years…
Lenalidomide was administered at 20 mg daily on days 1-21 of a 28-day cycle for 12 cycles during induction, followed by dose reduction to 15 mg during maintenance
Adverse events (AEs) during maintenance were asymptomatic grade 3-4 cytopenias including neutropenia (42%), thrombocytopenia (5%), and anemia (3%). Grade 1-2 AEs included upper respiratory infection (45%), urinary tract infection (21%), sinusitis (13%), and cellulitis (11%), which were managed in outpatient settings…
Secondary malignancies were seen in 6 patients, 15%…
Posted in cancer, integrative therapy, side effects ID and prevention Tagged with:

Myeloma Bone Pain- Cannabinoids, Opioids, Bone Health Therapies?

My husband is in terrible bone pain as a result from his multiple myeloma and I am DESPERATE for help! Any hope, help or info you could provide me would be greatly appreciated

Dear Cancer Coach- My husband has been diagnosed with Multiple Myeloma and nearly died from an unintentional overdose of too many prescribed medications for his bone pain yesterday.

He is only 49 years old and we have two young boys. I am fighting the biggest fight of our lives right now and I don’t know where to start. I am wondering if C-B-D oil can help.

My husband is in terrible pain and I am DESPERATE for help! Any hope, help or info you could provide me would be greatly appreciated. Ellen


Dear Ellen- I am sorry to read of your husband’s MM diagnosis and bone pain. First and foremost please understand that while multiple myeloma is considered an incurable blood cancer in the eyes of conventional oncology

  1. there is a long and growing list of conventional (FDA approved) MM therapies
  2. there is a long and growing list of evidence-based NON-conventional therapies and lastly
  3. at the age of 49, your husband is young as MMers go. This means his prognosis is good.

I will address several specific issues and then ask you some questions below.

1) Pain meds- cannabidiol aka C-B-D oil has been shown to help with cancer-induced bone pain. Your challenge will depend on the availability of C-B-D oil- what state do you live in? The C-B-D oil available on the Internet is made from industrial hemp with little or no cannabinoid content or T-H-C. This will not help your husband manage his pain.

2) Are you considering “induction” chemotherapy such as RVd (Revlimid, Velcade and Dexamethsone)? While I always caution against toxicity your husband’s pain should subside one his MM goes into remission.

Related issue- Is your husband feeling bone pain in his spine? Has he experienced any bone damage aka bone breaks? If so, he may want to consider local radiation to kill any/all lesions in his spine. Your oncologist should discuss this therapy with you.

I am both a MM survivor and MM Cancer Coach. I will email you the integrative therapies guide to your hotmail email address. Please consider integrative therapies to manage the side effects of chemo while enhancing the chemo’s efficacy.

Finally “hope.” Ellen, conventional oncology has gotten pretty good at putting MMers in to remission. The challenge is “overall survival.” As a MMer myself I have lived in complete remission since ’99 through evidence-based, non-toxic therapies such as nutrition, supplementation, etc. I believe your husband will achieve longer overall survival by combining conventional with non-conventional therapies.

Please watch the free webinar linked on the right side of this page. Let me know if you have any questions.

First things first. Are you considering induction therapy? Are you considering an autologous stem cell transplant? What state do you live in?

Hang in there,

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer
Posted in integrative therapy, Multiple Myeloma, non-conventional therapies Tagged with:

ASCT for Multiple Myeloma? C-Reactive Protein Indicates OS-

Elevated pre-ASCT CRP identifies a high-risk population especially in patients undergoing delayed ASCT for multiple myeloma…

The study linked and excerpted below documents how an elavated c-reactive protein level indicates a worse outcome for the myeloma patient who waits 12 months or more after his/her initial diagnosis to undergo an autlogous stem cell transplant.

Waiting longer to undergo ASCT does not have to mean that you don’t treat your health. How about undergoing therapies to reduce your CRP? How about undergoing evidence-based, anti-MM nutrition, supplementation and detoxification?

My name is David Emerson. I am a long-term MM survivor and MM Cancer Coach. Please watch my free webinar to learn more about the MM Cancer Coaching program that I researched and designed based on my own long-term MM experience.

Thank you,

 

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

C-reactive protein

C-reactive protein (CRP) is an annular (ring-shaped), pentameric protein found in blood plasma, whose levels rise in response to inflammation. It is an acute-phase protein of hepatic origin that increases following interleukin-6 secretion by macrophages and T cells

Elevated pre-transplant C-reactive protein identifies a high-risk subgroup in multiple myeloma patients undergoing delayed autologous stem cell transplantation

“We analyzed 1111 MM patients who underwent ASCT at Mayo Clinic from 2007 to 2015…

Elevated CRP (> upper normal limit (8 mg/L)) was seen in 14% and 22% of patients undergoing early and delayed ASCT, respectively (P=0.003).

There was no correlation of CRP with pre-transplant response, bone marrow plasma cell percentage or labeling index. Patients with an elevated CRP had a higher likelihood of having circulating plasma cells prior to ASCT

In the early ASCT cohort, the median overall survival (OS) in patients with normal and elevated CRP was not reached and 91 months respectively.

In the delayed ASCT cohort, the median OS in respective groups were 73 and 30 months respectively, with elevated CRP being an independent prognostic marker on multivariate analysis.

Elevated pre-transplant CRP identifies a high-risk population especially in patients undergoing delayed ASCT and should be incorporated in the pre-transplant evaluation…”

 

Posted in diagnostic testing, Multiple Myeloma, non-conventional therapies Tagged with:

Relapsed, Refractory aka Heavily Pre-Treated Multiple Myeloma- Understanding the Next Step…

“For heavily pre-treated patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM), bortezomib, dexamethasone, thalidomide, cisplatin, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide and etoposide (VDT PACE) regimen and its modifications (VDT PACE-like regimens [VPLRs]) are effective”

Your cancer, multiple myeloma, is both incurable but very treatable. The article below is evidence of this contradictory statement. If you are similar to the study participants below, you have already undergone at least four therapies and an autologous stem cell transplant. You probably have been in and out of remission several times. But you still have therapies to try.

The point of this post is to clearly outline what the article means when it says VDT-PACE is effective.

First and foremost you will be exposing your body to a lot of toxicity.  As a long-term MM and MM Cancer Coach I encourage you to consider integrative therapies that research shows can minimize the toxicity of chemotherapy. My guess is that you are willing to undergo this toxicity because you are running out of therapy options.

The good news is that the top 10% of MMers  who undergo VDT-PACE will achieve a very good partial remission. A little more than half of the patients (54.4%), experienced a partial remission. And then about two-thirds of patients experienced a minimal response.

While myeloma is considered to be very treatable, MMer will experience short, long-term and late stage side effects along the way and these MMers will eventuall be told that nothing more can be done for them. Please consider those evidence-based but non-toxic, non-conventional therapies that research has been shown is cytotoxic to MM and can reduce chemotherapy’s side effects.

My name is David Emerson. I have lived with MM since 1994 and have researched and produced a MM cancer coaching program based on my experiences. Please watch the free webinar linked on the right of the page. If you have any questions please scroll down the page, post a question or comment. I will reply to you ASAP.

Thank you,

 

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

VDT PACE effective in relapsed, refractory multiple myeloma

“For heavily pre-treated patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM), bortezomib, dexamethasone, thalidomide, cisplatin, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide and etoposide (VDT PACE) regimen and its modifications (VDT PACE-like regimens [VPLRs]) are effective, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in the American Journal of Hematology

Patients had received a median of four prior therapies, including (SCT) in 66.7 percent. Overall. 67.4 percent of patients received VDT PACE, 14.2 percent received VD PACE, and 18.4 percent received other VPLRs. A median of one cycle of VPLR was received by patients

The researchers observed

  • ≥ %68.4 minimal ,
  • ≥ %54.4 partial response (PR), and
  • ≥ %10.3 very good PR, patients, respectively.

Median progression-free and overall survival was 3.1 and 8.1 months, respectively.

Overall, 82.3 percent of patients received some therapy after VPLR:

  • 61.2 percent received systemic chemotherapy and
  • 38.8 percent underwent SCT.

For those who received SCT after VPLR, median overall survival was 15.1 months. For patients receiving VPLRs, age ≥60 years and revised international staging system III stage predicted shorter overall survival (hazard ratios, 2.3 and 2.4, respectively).”

 

Posted in Multiple Myeloma, non-conventional therapies, nutrition, side effects ID and prevention Tagged with:

You Can Take Control of Your Multiple Myeloma

side-widget-mm-webinar-image