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Recently Diagnosed or Relapsed? Stop Looking For a Miracle Cure, and Use Evidence-Based Therapies To Enhance Your Treatment and Prolong Your Remission

Multiple Myeloma an incurable disease, but I have spent the last 25 years in remission using a blend of conventional oncology and evidence-based nutrition, supplementation, and lifestyle therapies from peer-reviewed studies that your oncologist probably hasn't told you about.

Click the orange button to the right to learn more about what you can start doing today.

Multiple Myeloma Survivor- A Different kind of Second Opinion-

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The Multiple Myeloma Cancer Coaching Course will Give You The Information and Therapies you Need to Beat Myeloma.

I’ve been a multiple myeloma survivor since early 1994. I’ve learned that when most people think of getting a second opinion after a diagnosis of multiple myeloma, (MM) they think of consulting another oncologist.

I’m not an oncologist. But I do know a lot about the good, bad and ugly aspects of multiple myeloma. I know that conventional oncology talks about a fraction of what multiple myeloma patients, survivors and caregivers need to learn about.

Conventional therapies such as surgery, radiation and chemotherapy is important. But evidence-based, non-conventional therapies like curcumin, CBD oil, whole-body hyperthermia, etc. are just as important.

While a traditional oncological second opinion can be useful, talking to a long-term MM survivor a long-term survivor who has experienced and studied both conventional and non-conventional cancer care may identify issues that a conventional oncologist won’t.

 

For example, have you talked to your oncologist about:

  • An anti-angiogenic (anti-cancer) diet and the foods you can incorporate into your daily meals to make your body less hospitable to multiple myeloma?
  • The side effects you can anticipate— both short-term and long-term– from chemotherapy and radiation treatments and the supplements you can take to help alleviate, prevent, or heal these side effects?
  • Whether or not your oncologist is a Multiple Myeloma specialist? If the hospital you go to has extensive experience with Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation (ASCT)?
  • The therapies you can undergo to help detoxify your body during and after chemotherapy treatments?
  • The psychological toll that myeloma takes on you and the importance of taking care of yourself mentally, emotionally, and spiritually?

These topics are a critical part of treating your MM.  You must look at this process holistically– meaning that fighting MM is about more than selecting radiation or chemotherapy.  There are many aspects to successfully treating MM and as a 20 plus year survivor, I know better than anyone how important these aspects are to long-term survival.

If you or a loved one have been diagnosed with Multiple Myeloma, let me say this loud and clear:

It is critical that you become an active participant in your care. Learn everything you can.

I am alive today largely because I took the time to find out everything I could about Multiple Myeloma and sought out the full spectrum of evidence-based MM therapies both conventional (FDA approved) and non-conventional.

Scroll down the page, post a question or a comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Hang in there,

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


Why get a second opinion?

“When you’re fighting a disease like cancer, you want to have confidence in the treatment options available and know that they are being delivered by a team of experts. A second opinion helps you feel confident that you are receiving the cancer care you need and deserve. A second opinion may reveal additional treatment options for your type and stage of cancer, or confirm a current treatment approach. Some treatment options may result in a speedier recovery, with fewer side effects and a better prognosis.

Exploring a second opinion may help you make a more informed decision about your cancer treatment. It may also introduce you to advanced treatment options, if they are available for your cancer type and stage. Here are six benefits of getting a second opinion for your cancer care:

Empowerment and control: By proactively seeking a second opinion, you and your loved ones become more informed about the available treatment options. Learning more about your cancer and your treatment options may also help you feel in control of your health.

Confidence and peace of mind: A second opinion may help you feel more confident that you are choosing the right treatment plan for you. According to one study, one in eight cancer patients is misdiagnosed. In some cases, a second opinion may point to a different type or stage of cancer, which would change the treatment plan. If the original diagnosis is confirmed, a second opinion may provide additional treatment options for you to consider…”


Multiple Myeloma Diagnosis- Get a Second Opinion- 7 key questions-

Job #1 of a Second Opinion is to Confirm your Multiple Myeloma Diagnosis- Different Oncologists recommend different therapy plans…

You have just received a multiple myeloma diagnosis. While it is a normal reaction is to want to hurry into treatment, to hurry to kill your MM, the most important thing for you to do is to take a deep breath and get a second opinion.

Why? A second opinion for a multiple myeloma diagnosis should give you information about your MM,

  • Your stage,
  • Your prognosis,
  • Your symptoms,
  • Your therapy choices

and possibly information about the how you will live the rest of your life.

My experience as a multiple myeloma survivor is to confirm the diagnosis of the first oncologist. A MM diagnosis is less about yes or no and more about:

  • cure vs. control,
  • aggressive or conservative treatments,
  • toxic vs. non-toxic.

Job # 2 is about what, if anything, this oncologist has to offer that is different from your first opinion. When I was first diagnosed with multiple myeloma and met with several different oncologists over a period of months.

I found that it is the degree of aggressiveness that separated oncologists’ recommendations. Meaning, one regimen differs from a second regimen in its outcome-

  • but may cause more or fewer side effects,
  • may cause more or less collateral damage.

It is critical for the newly diagnosed cancer patient to understand this.

It is important to note that the MM specialist who provides the longest average five year survival, Dr. James Berenson, does not believe in an autologous stem cell transplant for MM. Dr. Berenson adopts a low-dose approach to managing multiple myeloma.

The questions you should focus on are:

  • What treatment options are available? What do you recommend and why?
  • Is the treatment you recommend curative?
  • What happens if the treatment doesn’t work for me?
  • What are the side effects of the treatment and how often do your patients experience them?
  • How many patients have you treated with my type and stage of cancer and how successful have you been?
  • What lifestyle changes—such as diet, exercise, and rest—do you recommend I make to stay as healthy as possible before, during, and after treatment?

I am both a MM survivor and MM cancer coach. I have remained in complete remission from my incurable cancer since 1999 by living an evidence-based, non-toxic, anti-cancer lifestyle through nutrition, supplementation, exercise, detoxification, bone health and mind-body therapies.

Conventional toxic chemotherapy and radiation are usually necessary for the average MM patient but it is a mistake, in my experience, to take a one-size-fits-all approach to your multiple myeloma.


Recommended Reading:


Could a Second Opinion Be Your Phoenix Rising Out of the Ashes?

“Nick VanDyk (patient advocate) might have said it best when he replied to a Pat Killingsworth (myeloma author) blog post by saying: “Oh and by the way, every time you mention the need for a specialist I want to jump up and down in energetic agreement. The one constant throughout all our observations is that the local hem / onc, no matter how good their bedside manner or how smart they may be, doesn’t have the knowledge to treat this disease with optimum efficacy. People need to find somebody who really understands the disease and has treated hundreds if not thousands of cases.”  I nor most doctors could say this any better!”

Seeking a Second Opinion

“Many people seek a second opinion to confirm a cancer diagnosis, learn more about the cancer, and hear different opinions on the best treatment options. Make sure the doctor you are visiting for a second opinion has access to all your records from your original diagnosis…

How a second opinion may help

A second opinion may provide the following information:

  • Confirmation of a diagnosis
  • Additional details about the type of cancer and its stage, such as:
  • Perspective from experts in different oncology disciplines, such as medical oncology, radiation oncology, and surgical oncology.
    • A description of where the cancer is located
    • Whether the cancer has spread
    • Whether it is affecting other parts of the body
  • Other treatment options, in cases where the doctor disagrees with the initial diagnosis or the proposed treatment plan
  • What clinical trials are available for you. These are research studies involving people…”

Why Get a Second Opinion

“Exploring a second opinion can help you make a more informed decision about your cancer treatment. It can also introduce you to advanced treatment options…”

 

Leave a Comment:

390 comments
sarah says 5 days ago

I’m helping a friend find some natural cures for her multiple myeloma since she has to take the chemo treatments per her insurance. Some of the drugs she is taking seem pretty severe in the side effects they can cause. She is taking Remlevid, dexamethasone, Decadron, and valcade (bortezomib). She was told at first that she was in Stage1 with a year life expectancy but this does not add up for me. I’m thinking with a year, she is in late stage 2 or stage 3. I’ve told her about the sodium bicarbonate treatment and juicing, taking vitamin C (she doesn’t have access to IV Vitamin C), and wasn’t sure if she could take latrile with these meds or not. Not sure if she can take tumeric with these meds either. I don’t want to tell her about them until I know more of how they will react with her chemo drugs. Can you give me any info on this? Thanks so much!

Reply
    David Emerson says a few days ago

    Hi Sarah,

    You’ve mentioned several different areas of possible therapies for your friend. By “areas” I mean dosing as it relates to her stage, integrative therapies shown to enhance the efficacy of her chemo (curcumin has been shown to enhance the efficacy of velcade/bortezomib) and finally, a big issue is that of natural cure- MM is considered to be incurable. The longest living MM survivors I know of combine low-dose chemo with integrative or complementary therapies.

    I will send the nutrition guide and the supplementation guide to your email address. The info in these guides should give you both some guidance going forward.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Penny says last month

I would like more information on the ordering of the book

Reply
    David Emerson says last month

    Hi Penny-

    Which book?

    David Emerson

    Reply
Virginia Garcia says a few months ago

I paid $198.00 and have not received the books 787-462-5156

Reply
Virginia Garcia says a few months ago

I paid $198.00 and have not received the books

Reply
jade says 6 months ago

great website – thanks. I am 68 and lived a lifestyle since the age of 17 that matches your recommendations. healthy, organic diet, no meat, nothing processed or with chemicals, vigorous exercise, close relationships with wonderful caring friends, a career that I love and regular supplements including CBD for the past 2-3 years. dx with MM 1 week ago. what a blow !

Reply
Kristina Morgan says 8 months ago

Dear Mr. Emerson,

My name is Kristina Morgan R.N. M.S.N. I am working as a pro-bono advocate for a patient who has been diagnosed with MM, second diagnosis by UCSD. She is adamant about not receiving traditional therapy and she has been utilizing alternative vitamin and herbal remedies.. She has had 3 blood transfusions within the last 6 months. Her labs are not good. I have been in contact with the BMT Team at UCSD. Her oncologist is extremely concerned as I am about her labs. She asked me to contact you. I referred her to the ER 2 nights ago secondary to extreme chest pain which did not result in an emboli diagnosis. She refuses to allow me to contact her oncologist about this last incident. She has viewed your website and has requested I reach out to you. At this point I am extremely concerned. I am not against alternative treatments. However, I believe in the future she may go hat route. As I see it she needs chemo asap.. She does not want to take
chemo and she has no-one in this area to care for her.. I totally understand how she feels. Therefore, I am respectfully reaching out to you for any recommendations from your experience.
If you should wish to contact me, my cell no is 760-518-1171. Thank you in advance for your assistance/guidance in this matter.

Kristina

Reply
    David Emerson says 8 months ago

    Hi Kristina-

    I am sorry to learn about the MM patient. While I am the first person to question toxic MM therapies, even I admit that all MM patients with advanced MM (stage 2 or 3) must undergo chemotherapy to bring their MM under control. RVD is the SOC induction therapy and has proven to be remarkable for newly diagnosed MM patients.

    If I were to speak to the MM patient I would recommend pre-habilitating her MM and then discuss possible integrative therapies to take WITH her induction chemotherapy (RVD).

    I would caution against an autologous stem cell transplant, depending on her diagnosis.

    I am telling the above to give you the basic info I would give if I were to talk with this person sometime.

    Let me know if you would like me to speak to this person on the phone.

    Thank you,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Gerardine says 10 months ago

Hello David where can I find the anti-cancer diet. thanks Gerardine

Reply
    David Emerson says 10 months ago

    Hi Gerardine- The “nutrition guide” in the MM CC program cites specific anti-MM foods and supplements. I encourage
    you to watch the video of the Ted Talk given by Dr. William Li as he talks about anti-angiogenic foods.

    David

    Reply
Randeni P Tilakeratne says 11 months ago

1. on March, 2020, I was diagnosed with Smouldering Myeloma which should to be monitored on a 3to 6 months basis. No lytic lesions on CT and Bone marrow showed good preservation of normal hematopoiesis , albeit with a 10-20% plasma infiltrate. IgG = 26.9 g/L, Abnormal Band= 19g/L, IgG Kappa paraprotein 19g/L. Kappa Free light Chains= 479. K/L ratio = 43.55, Hemoglobin = 140g/L
2. Monitoring on 16.06.2020. – IgG= 29.3g/L, Abnormal Band = 22g/L, Kappa free light trains= 575, K/L ratio= 57.5, B2M= 2.57 mg/L, Hemoglobin= 138g/L, LDH= 211U/L
3. Monitoring on 03.10.2020: IgG=33.2g/L, Abnormal Band= 30.9g/L, Kappa free light trains= 864, K/L ratio= 97.07, B2M= 2.252, Hemoglobin= 114, Gamma=34.7g/L, LDH= 569 U/L, Creatine = 106.08umol/L. ESR=42mm/h.
I was started giving treatments on18.10.2020 as follows:
Cycle No.1:
First (01st) Cycle Day 1
Zoledronic Acid 4mg
Dexamethasone 20mg
INJ Bortezomib 2mg
Thalidomide 50 mg (will be given orally) Once a day

Day 2
(after 4 days) 1.INJ Bortezomib 2 mg
2. Dexamethasone 20 mg (will be given orally)
3. Thalidomide 50 mg (will be given orally)

Day 3 (After 4 days) INJ Bortezomib 2mg
2. Dexamethasone 20 mg (will be given orally)
3. Thalidomide 50 mg (will be given orally)

Day 4 (After 4 days) INJ Bortezomib 2mg
2. Dexamethasone 20 mg (will be given orally)
3. Thalidomide 50 mg (will be given orally)

2nd, 3rd, and 4th Cycles will be repeated mostly in the same way. There will be a gap of 21 days between each cycle.
Would you please tell me I am in What stage of SMM or MM? Why such a big jump in between 2nd 3rd monitoring? I am 72 years old.

Appreciate, very much if you guide me accordingly. Thanks lot’

Reply
Cathy Steele says last year

I have considered joining your program, but one of the things holding me back relates to age. The people I see like you who go into remission for 20+ years are generally diagnosed in their 40s or younger. I was diagnosed at 67, and just turned 68. Do you have evidence that your program contributes substantially to longevity for those like myself who are diagnosed at more advanced ages? Most folks in my family lived into their 90s. I have no comorbidities. I am also an avid researcher, and disciplined at following protocol, with the exception of those times I am nauseated from the Velcade. During those times, I don’t do bad things, I just am not able to do all the good things. Thank you in advance for your response.

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Cathy,

    Thanks for reaching out. The average age of the newly diagnosed MM patients is 69 according to the American Cancer Society. The ages of MM CC clients, as far as I can tell, spreads from 40’s,50’s,60’s,70’s,80’s and even a pre-mm client in his 90’s. It sounds like you are heading in the right direction. Good luck.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Ronald Neuman says last year

Dear David,

Are you familiar with light chains myeloma? It is one of the types of aggressive MM which about 15% of MM patients have. While the evidence-based nutrition, supplementation and lifestyle therapies appear to benefit MM patients, will the described evidence-based therapies help those who have a free light chain disease such as aggressive light chains myeloma?

Thank you for your response.

Reply
    David Emerson says last year

    Hi Ronald,

    I will reply to your post directly via email. Thanks.

    David Emerson

    Reply
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gina says 3 years ago

I think you are wrong about sugar. I am receiving immunotherapy for my MM and I have Krispy Kreme donuts after every infusion. My M-protein is zero. Gina

Reply
    David Emerson says 3 years ago

    Hi Gina,

    I’m not sure what you mean about being wrong about sugar. While I and many studies encourage reducing sugar I don’t believe that anyone can totally eliminate all sugar from their diet. Regarding a donut after every infusion, my guess is that the mind-body benefits of a donut outweigh the negatives regarding sugar:-)

    I would add fruits and veggies to your diet however. MM is a marathon not a race. Congrats on an M-spike of zero.

    thanks

    David Emerson

    Reply
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Tara says 4 years ago

My father has a large lump on his neck and he will not go to the doctor but i am pretty sure it is cancer of his lymph node. I have tried to get his to at least start taking some natural things like Teas and hash oil topically…. is there any advice you can give me to pass on to him about types of treatments and or things he could try at home?

I have read that taking alkaline things can stop cancer growth…. any suggestions might help.

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Tara-
    The key to your father’s quality and quantify of life going forward is a function of him getting a diagnosis for his neck. Please tell your dad that he does NOT have to do anything that his doctor tells him. Your dad is simply trying to figure out what the lumps are.

    Good luck,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Leslie says 4 years ago

My mom had breast cancer, stage 2, estrogen positive and her (+), in 2000 which she underwent chemo for and one of the chemo’s damaged her heart.

Two weeks ago she was diagnosed w/ liver and bone cancer. The biopsy shows it is the return of the breast cancer…. estrogen positive but this time her (-).

I would like to research natural/alternative healing vs. chemo. I can’t find any places in central TX anywhere online that treat other than w/ chemo as the main treatment.

Any suggestions on possible treatments to look into or doctors/practitioners, etc. would be greatly appreciated!!

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Leslie-

    I am sorry to read of your mom’s BC relapse. I want to understand your situation clearly. Are you saying that your mom’s breast cancer, first diagnosed in 2000 has metastasized to her bones and liver?

    I am asking as my recommendations for therapies vary depending on the survivor’s situation.

    Let me know and we can discuss therapy specifics.

    David Emerson

    Reply
    valerie says 4 years ago

    My mom went through a similar experience and she too healed herself through a natural process by an herbalist she got in contact with.
    .She had dysplaysia and detrimental cancer stage 3c. Here she is a year later and she is cancer free. It was a lot of work taking those herbs but she did it without chem. Her Dr told her she’d be dead in a year, well with chemo she probably would have. Fight the fight and keep on fighting. still have the contact of herbal Dr if you want to give it a try. Blessings.

    Reply
      David Emerson says 4 years ago

      Hi Valerie-

      Thanks very much for your story. Do you remember what herbs your mom took?

      David Emerson
      MM Survivor
      MM Cancer Coach

      Reply
Rebecca says 4 years ago

I’ve had a reaccurence of lobular breast cancer. I am trying to avoid chemo and radiation. I had a nightmare experience with this last surgeon, which caused another tumor to appear within 6 weeks. I am using Aztec indian healing clay. This seems to make the area feel very sore. I had a biopsy on it 4 days ago. Could this be the reason for the pain. Could this be that its pulling out toxin? should I continue using the clay. Would it be possible to reply on my email? Presently, also, I am doing parts of the Gerson Institute program and taking Poly MVA. Bekk

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Rebecca-

    I will reply to your email address.

    David Emerson

    Reply
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Reply
Debbie says 4 years ago

HI David,
I had a bilateral mastectomy Nov 25, it has been a roller coaster ride but I am feeling almost like myself now. Still waiting for incisions to heal they had to open me back up a couple of weeks ago and cut away dead tissue and relieve all the fluid in there. Much better though. I did have the Onca DX test and it came bake only 1% difference for re occurrence if I did the chemo with the hormone therapy. I did take the hormone therapy but turned down the chemo ( I am soon to be 59), my surgeons are ok with it but the onocologist insisted I need chemo, I still said no. Today I am going to talk to the radiologist because a couple of specs were seen in the lymph nodes. What are your thoughts/suggestions on this???

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Debbie-

    Thank you for reaching out. I am sorry to read of your BC diagnosis though it sounds as if you are doing as well as can be expected. If I understand your post correctly, you underwent the Oncotype DX Breast Cancer Recurrence Score and “came back only 1% difference for recurrence.” I take you to mean that your chance of BC relapse is only 1%. Are you saying that Oncotype is only accurate if you have chemotherapy too? If you underwent a double mastectomy and if you underwent hormone therapy you will reduce your risk of relapse.

    In answer to your question, “What are your thoughts/suggestions on this???” You must ask your oncologist if chemotherapy and or radiation will FURTHER reduce your risk of relapse that offsets your increased risk of side effects and secondary cancer. In other words, will chemo and or radiation be worth it to you?

    My personal belief is that conventional oncology minimizes the risks of chemo and radiation. However I don’t know enough about your particular situation to advise you one way or another.

    If your oncologist “insisted I need chemo” ask him/her to be specific. Will the benefits outweigh the risks?

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Marinko Bleko says 4 years ago

This is a great site. I did not read all of it but what I did makes lot of sence.

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Thanks Marinko-

    Reply
https://is.gd/b3DWcV says 4 years ago

You are ɑ very intelliggent person!

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Thank you.

    Reply
Lori says 4 years ago

I have been diagnosed with an aggressive Lymphoma cancer based on pathology report on excised tumor removed from lacrimal gland. Have just went through PET, MUGA, Bone marrow extraction and MRI of brain and Eye sockets. I am totally against Chemo and oncologist says I can not survive without it. Are there other alternatives out there to consider. Any questions I need to ask Oncologist to get a better idea of what exactly is going on?

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Lori-

    I am sorry to read of your lymphoma diagnosis. Your therapy plan will depend largely on your specific stage at diagnosis. Meaning, what specific type of lymphoma have you been diagnosed with? And then what stage of that specific type of lymphoma? While there are many evidence-based types of therapies for you to consider, your challenge will be to find those therapies that research shows can produce a remission or a cure.

    I can give you more info based on your type and stage of lymphoma.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Fraser Card says 4 years ago

Hello David :
at age 51,2002 diagnose Prostate Cancer. They removed the Prostate,(2003) a nick off the bladder, bed of the Prostate and the\Seminal Glands, along with some “other’ soft tissue. O.R. time involved, 10.5hrs. My Gleason was a score of 8 at the time. Two years later,(2006) 39treatments of Radiation.

2009 left Kidney removed, save the Adrenal Gland

Jan 2016 my PSA was 5.9 so March saw the start of Hormone Therapy. I got my first shot March, shot two June and at that shot Chemo Pills was brought up…but I told them I’m riding my bike to L.A., Cal., come mid July….felt I didnt have room on my bike for them…they are not happy, then my third shot was Sept and they were even LESS happy when I told them that shot was my last……freaking side effects I can tell ya. Sept PSA was .057. So I’ve decided to stop the Hormone Therapy…..at least until the PSA gets to a 6 or so ? Maybe ?

My Prostate was NOT saturated. It had cancer only but on one half of the gland. Eight samples were taken from the gland, 3were cancer. Yet every thing around and away from my Prostate was cancer, like my Sem Glands, the bed of, well….. you get the drift here right ?

Question : is it possible……the cancer started in my back area and traveled TO my Prostate ? Because……every one at the hospital I knew who had the very same as me, RE: Gleason Score our PSA’s….. are all gone now. In my class if you would, I’m the only one left, and the doctors are very surprised I’m 5yrs to the good at this point. I’m still working full time by the way, self employed, K ? 17,000K’s in less than 3weeks, on my Motorcycle in July/Aug

So ya Eh ? have you heard or talked to other guys who thought their cancer may have started else where first THEN moved into the Prostate ?

So there ya have me question Eh ?

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Fraser-

    I am sorry to read of all of your PCa challenges. To be honest, I am not qualified to offer comment on your question “? have you heard or talked to other guys who thought their cancer may have started else where first THEN moved into the Prostate?” Your situation is intricate. Conventional oncology should be able to look at your health history and offer more information.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Mariola says 4 years ago

Hello,
My good friend has cancer in the stomach, liver and bones. She had her ovaries removed because they had tumors. She is taking Traditional Chinese Medicine for this and Peruvian herbs. She is considering taking colloidal silver and B17. Is this a good idea? Is there anything else she can do? She is done with chemotherapy, it has poisoned her completely and the doctors tell her she is going to die.
She has four small children and her husband is hospitalized after surgery due to cancer as well. We desperately want her to survive!
Thanks,
Mariola

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Mariola-

    I am sorry to read of your friend’s stomach cancer that has metastasized to her liver and bones. Re your question ” Is there anything else she can do?” Yes, but at this point your decision-making is difficult as there is little if any available research to support non-conventional therapies.

    Your friend’s cancer is advanced. There are non-conventional therapies such as nutrition, supplementation, etc. Let me know if you would like additional research done on the available non-conventional therapies.

    David Emerson
    Cancer Survivor
    Cancer Coach

    Reply
Keith says 4 years ago

I have recently been diagnosed with prostate cancer. I am at a loss as to which treatment to chose. My first instinct is to remove it, get rid of it…..surgery. I have been given the option of full radiation over 34-36 treatments or Brachytherapy with 15 treatments of radiation. I am overwhelmed at what choice to make. Surgery could involve incontinence etc. and of course an incision and longer recovery time. I will need three injections of hormone treatments before brachytherapy but it is less invasive to my body and has less side effects. Of course my one and only concern is making it go away. I don’t know which way to turn. I am 66 years old no in mid range of severity.

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Keith-

    I am sorry to read of your prostate cancer diagnosis. I understand being challenged by a dizzying array of therapy choices each with their own risk/reward or pro/con trade-offs. Keep in mind that there are evidence-based non-conventional therapies for each of the conventional therapies that you mention that may reduce your risk of side effects.

    Meaning, for example, there are therapies for you to undergo with radiation that will reduce your risk of collateral damage. In addition, I encourage you to add evidence-based, anti-prostate cancer nutrition, supplementation, bone health and lifestyle therapies to your regimen.

    I am both a cancer survivor and cancer coach. I work with cancer patients to research and design programs to manage their cancer based on their goals. You are relatively young as PCa patients go. You should be able to manage your cancer for years to come with minimal side effects.

    What are your PSA and Gleason scores? Have you been given a stage?

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Tanya says 4 years ago

I was diagnosed with DCIS, stage 0. Don’t know which type yet. I have an appointment to speak with the surgeon tomorrow but this is frustrating because some say it’s abnormal cells that MAY become cancer and others day its precancerous. I Changed my diet and began exercising immediately. I’ve lost 10 pounds in 11 days. Not sure if surgery is the right things for this as it’s not really cancer and unnecessary surgery has its own side effects. Any information in this? Thx so much!

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Tanya-

    I apologize for the slow reply. Major holidays slow my cancer coaching.

    I am sorry to read of your DCIS. Keep in mind that many consider a diagnosis of DCIS to NOT be cancer but a sort of PRE-cancer. First and foremost you should know that you have already reduced your risk of a full BC diagnosis by changing your diet, exercising and losing 10 pounds. A growing number of studies document frequent, modest exercise and weight loss to be effective therapies for BC.

    Regarding surgery. You are correct when you say that surgery has it’s own side effects. Any therapy after a diagnosis of DCIS should be able to slightly reduce your risk of BC. Slightly. Many women have a lumpectomy after a DCIS diagnosis. It is an open question as to whether further therapy will improve your risk/reward outcome.

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Monique says 4 years ago

Hi David,
My Dad is 75 and was recently diagnosed with Stage 2 esophageal cancer. I am interested in any information you can offer as to maximizing his treatment. He is meeting his oncologist tomorrow and the plan is chemotherapy and radiation for 4-6 weeks then his surgeon plans on removing the tumor after another 4 weeks following chemo. Is it possible to help open up his esophagus with cryoablation for example while undergoing his other treatments. I am concerned that with his esophagus blocked by the tumor 70% that this will start to seriously impact his ability to eat. I am interested in any information you might have to offer. Thank you so very much for your kindness and your efforts to help people educate themselves on the best options available.

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Monique-

    I apologize for the slow reply. Major holidays always slow my cancer coaching. I am sorry to read of your dad’s EC diagnosis. I can provide evidence-based integrative and complementary therapies though it is difficult for me to know enough about your dad’s situation to be able to answer your question about his throat, cryoablation, etc. This is something his oncologist must speak to.

    An example of an integrative therapy is curcumin in combination with the possible standard chemotherapy regimens cisplatin and 5-FU-

    I encourage your dad to take integrative therapies for radiation as well. Let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Sarah says 4 years ago

Hi there,

I was recently diagnosed with Stage IV colon cancer with spread to the liver and I am already aware of the extremely low prognosis, I was wondering if you had any ideas of what I should do as a last resort? My oncologist told me that surgery would not be an option at this point and the best we can do is go full-out with chemo and hope for the best. I am very wary of this as, with the state I am in, chemo will most likely weaken my body even more. What would you recommend to me at this point? I am at a crossroads as I fully believe in natural therapies but I don’t want to take too much of a risk of making it worse. Also keep in mind that I am only 18 (which made my cancer diagnosis even more of a shock)
Thanks

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Sarah,

    I apologize for the tardy reply. I am sorry to read of your metastatic stage 4 colon cancer diagnosis. As for your question ” I was wondering if you had any ideas of what I should do as a last resort?” I would use every evidence-based therapy, conventional and non-conventional, that I could identify. For example, I would combine evidence-based integrative therapies with chemo in an effort to enhance the chemo while moderating its toxicity, I would pursue nutritional therapies, I would take supplements that have been shown to be cytotoxic to colon cancer, etc.

    I too believe in natural therapies as they are non-toxic for the most part however keep in mind that your cancer is advanced enough that you many not have enough time to allow natural therapies to work.

    The fact that you are young (18) can be viewed as a positive… sort of. Meaning your body should manage the shot gun approach I outline above. The older average cancer patient (65-70) cannot handle the rigors of cancer therapy generally speaking.

    I am both a cancer survivor and cancer coach. I work with cancer patients to design therapy plans like the one I am advocating for you. Let me know if you have any questions.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Sarah-

    I came across an article just now that may be of interest to you. I will link the article and also excerpt that content which I think applies to your. Keep in mind that your current oncologist/center may not provide this therapy. You may need to research those cancer centers that do provide this therapy. While you do not have “Peritoneal carcinomatosis” the therapy discussed below might be useful for you combined with nutrition, supplementation, lifestyle, etc. Again, you are young so go for it…

    HIPEC in Colorectal Cancer With Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

    “As CRS and HIPEC are still accumulating data, there are a limited number of clinical trials off which to base regimens. One study showed a median overall survival of 19.2 months in patients treated with CRS and HIPEC.4 The overall survival was increased to approximately 32 months when there was complete CRS. Another study demonstrated an overall median survival advantage when comparing CRS and HIPEC (22.3 months) to palliative surgery combined with systemic chemotherapy (12.6 months).5 A systematic review reported improved medial survival—33 vs 12.5 months—and 5-year survival—40% vs 13%—when comparing CRS and HIPEC to palliative surgery and systemic chemotherapy.6”

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Clement Lisanke says 4 years ago

Hi David: I was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2006, biopsy, T2b and my PSA at 6.5. Symptome: Nocturna, getting up 6 or so times a night.
and taking a watch and wait approach. In 2015 my PSA 93 and in April
took hormone shot which dropped Psa to 5.Now Psa back to 23. I am not
in favor of doing another biopsy, risks involved. Do you know any other
way of dropping PSA then going back on hormone shot? Now, I’m 76 years old. Thanks for your suggestions.

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Clement-

    If I read your post correctly you are in favor of balancing quality with quantity of life. Meaning you do NOT want to undergo aggressive therapies and run the risk of short and long term side effects.

    There are a host of evidence-based, non-toxic prostate cancer therapies. Yes, these therapies are slow acting compared to therapies such as radiation or prostate removal. But there are few if any side effects.

    Further, there are evidence-based therapies that integrate with hormone therapy (androgen deprivation therapy). I understand your desire not to have another biopsy but you should keep an eye on your prostate cancer. How about another PSA test?

    David Emerson

    Reply
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c says 4 years ago

My father was diagnosed only 2 weeks ago with stage 4 Metastatic Prostate cancer, spread into the bone and impacting the bladder. He was in medicine before his retirement, but always appreciated integrated medicine and had us on many naturopathic remedies as kids. I’m told that the proscribed regimen: hormone therapy, radiation, and later bone building therapy; will give him great relief of pain in the short term a great prognosis for recovery in long term. BUT it involves getting a bone biopsy he does not want. Now he is debating the whole regimen. What naturopathic or other treatments are available with some evidence of success? Currently he cannot walk unassisted due to size of prostate and impairment of bone, and I fear if he does not begin something ASAP he will lose what is left of his strength.

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Caroline-

    I am sorry to read of your father’s metastatic PCa diagnosis. This is a long reply so be sure to ask me anything that you find confusing.

    I’m not sure but I think you left out the word “not” in the sentence about pain relief and long-term prognosis. I will be direct. Once prostate cancer grows outside of a man’s prostate gland, there is no conventional curative therapy. The therapies prescribed for your dad, hormone, radiation, bisphophonates (bone strengthening) are all therapies that slow your dad’s PCa but they cannot cure it.

    Keep in mind that while these therapies are designed to “give him great relief of pain” they will also give him short and long-term side effects. Hormone therapy is also called Androgen Deprivation Therapy. Radiation may cause damage to surrounding tissue.

    I don’t know what the bone biopsy is for. I don’t believe his oncologist will not allow the above mentioned therapies to proceed if your dad does not have a BMB.

    There are many evidence-based, yet non-conventional (not approved by the FDA) therapies for PCa and for bone pain. All are complimentary meaning that they will not interfere with his conventional therapies.

    MR imaging-guided focused ultrasound for treatment of bone metastasis.

    What stage does your dad live in? CBD oil has been shown to be cytotoxic (kill) PCa while giving pain relief and helping people sleep.

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson
    Cancer Survivor
    Cancer Coach

    Reply
Terri says 4 years ago

I was diagnosed with a benign brain tumor (on the left outside, next to my skull). they want to do surgery, I am using frankincense oil on the roof of my mouth for now and taking Keppra, have some swelling around the tumor. Having some headaches is all.

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Terri-

    I am sorry to read of your benign brain tumor. Good luck.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Rosie says 4 years ago

Hi David,

I wonder if you have ever stumbled on anything useful regarding NF1.

My son is 3 y.o., and has this gene mutation making him prone to tumors. He has optic nerve gliomas on both sides, at present I am sticking to diets (as much as possible with such a small toddler), curcumin, reishi, organic sulfur, aloe gel, Hoxsey tonic, … my list is long. His last MRI shows no progression, which is a victory in itself. But I’m always looking for a fresh look on his protocol and ideas how to maybe make it even better. Have anything in your sleeve for gliomas or NF1? For toddlers?

Thank you in advance!

Have a wonderful weekend!

Rosie

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Rosie-

    If I understand you, your 3 year old son has optic nerve gliomas that are benign and not growing? If this is correct, yes, your efforts are in fact a victory in itself. By this I mean that conventional oncology has little to offer you. And you are managing your son’s situation successfully with non-toxic therapies. I know of no specific therapy for NF! gene mutation.

    However I will say that I believe that genetic expression can be changes through diet, supplementation and lifestyle- like you are doing- aka epigenetic. Therefore you appear to be doing as much as possible in your situation.

    I wish I could offer more info and therapies. Let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Derek G. says 4 years ago

I need a second opinion from a chemotherapy doctor. My chemo oncologist has told me that I would not be able to receive chemo here in Canada if I traveled abroad for immunotherapy and then had a later recurrence. In testing, immunotherapy has shown to be more more potent against my particular cancer than Xeloda. My cancer advisor has told me to get a second opinion but I don’t know where to start. Do I ask my family doctor to set it up or do I just start phoning around?

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Derek-

    I am sorry to say that I do not have an answer for you. I am not a medical doctor. Further, we have different rules here in the states.
    I am sorry that I cannot be more help.

    David Emerson

    Reply
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Ericka Moore says 4 years ago

Hi, David I just had surgery to remove a type 2 hemangiopericytoma it was total recession.
On August 31st. And now I am second guessing my self about radiotherapy (radiation) for the tumor bed. The questions is should I do this?

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Ericka-

    I am sorry to read of your HP. I am sorry for my tardy reply. Several points for you to consider in answer to your question “And now I am second guessing my self about radiotherapy (radiation) for the tumor bed. The questions is should I do this?”

    I will link and excerpt a study below that pertains to your situation.
    Hemangiopericytomas grade II are not benign tumors.

    “With respect to the available literature and our own experiences, the aggressiveness, especially of differentiated grade II HPs, seems to be underestimated…”

    “Complete surgical resection could be achieved in 60% of cerebral and in 25% of spinal HPs”

    “in this study, we could not detect a single patient showing any recurrences or systemic metastases after complete surgical resection of grade II HPs..”

    “With respect to our results, radical surgical resection offers the best treatment option to control tumor progress. In case of subtotal resection or histopathologically diagnosed anaplasia (WHO III), radiotherapy seems to be indicated; however, chemotherapy did not show effectiveness to control tumor progress.”

    This study concludes that grade II HP’s that achieve COMPLETE resection did not benefit from chemo or radiation. Keep in mind that this is a rare cancer and this is a small study of a rare cancer.

    There are evidence-based, non-conventional therapies that are cytotoxic to various cancers including brain cancers. I would have to research/look for for specific therapies for grade II HP however. I mention this because I pursue non-toxic to manage my own cancer. As a cancer coach I research non-toxic therapies for other cancers.

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson

    Reply
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Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

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    Reply
Gurbachan Singh Bassan says 4 years ago

I am 70 yrs and was diagnosed as Blood cancer patient in Aug.2016.I am avoiding chemo.(light dose)and taking Ayurvedic medicines and garlic and termeric powder.i am also doing yoga exercises and go for average walk.My neutrofils had gone to 0.2% on 25 Aug.16 then came to 0.3% on 6th.Oct.16.Yesterday i went for blood work and again neutrofils have gone down to.0.2%.What to do.My Doc.briefed me about side effects of tretment.

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Gurbackan-

    Can you tell me which blood cancer you have been diagnosed with? Leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma?

    David Emerson

    Reply
Robert (Bob) Brooks says 4 years ago

David,
How fortunate can I be? I was looking for alternatives to MM treatment and look where I landed. It almost 10:30 out here in San Diego. I’m normally in bed by 7. So I’m getting sleepy. But I read your article and tomorrow when I not so tired,I’ll read it again. I don’t yet know how you can help, but hopefully I’ll find out tomorrow. I’ll try now to give a brief summary of where I’m at with MM.

I was diagnosed 2 years ago and they wanted to start me on Revlimid. When I read the history of the drug, I balked. I’m old enough to remember the Thalidomide babies and a classmate of mine actually had one of those children. She died at birth.

I got a second opinion from Mayo in Rochester and decided to delay any treatment but just be monitored.

This January, the ONC told me I couldn’t delay any longer. She thought my kidneys were being affected and in months I may need dialysis. So I started treatments that day. Because I was in very good condition for 83, she prescribed an “aggressive” treatment. I can’t remember the names but each Wednesday I got 40 mgs of a steroid, 14 capsules of some chemo drug and a shot in the belly. Side effects were minimal – a little bloating for a few days. But the s hit the f on Mother’s Day. The pain from my waist down my legs was so awful that I went to the ER twice before they knew I was really in a lot of pain. I hate to say it but the pain killers didn’t work.

But they released me and about 10 days later I saw my PCP who put me on both Morphine and Percocet. That finally relieved the pain. But I continued treatments despite the pain until the end of June. ONC decided that the bad was outweighing the good. I’ve spent the ensuing 4 months trying to get back to health. Last week was the first time since Mother’s Day that I can say I’m on the road back. I am walking 2 miles each day and I’m starting a program at the Y in November to get some strength in my muscles.

Last week I had a meeting with the ONC. The critical test (I don’t know what it’s called) but it went from a low of 0.9 in July, to 1.1 in August and to 1.7 in October. The next day she referred me to an associate who is Myeloma-only. After about 10 minutes, he said “you can’t wait any longer, you must start Revlimid next week.” The hated word Revlimid is back.

I haven’t met with my ONC since then but I’ve been thinking and I think I want to see if there’s something else that I should consider. Btw, I’m not afraid to die. The thought probably bothers my wife and children more than me. I just don’t want to die a painful death.

I’ll be back at your site tomorrow. thanks for being here.
bob

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    HI Bob-

    I am sorry to read of your MM diagnosis and therapy side effects. While MM is a complicated blood cancer you do have options- both conventional and non-conventional. It is difficult for me to list your options with pros and cons so I will list a few general areas for you to think about.

    Conventional FDA approved chemotherapy regimes such as Velcade (the shot in the belly), Dexamethasone (the steroid), and Revlimid (pills)”

    While conventional oncology works to adhere to “standard” regimens (cocktails) and doses, you to not have to only choose yes or no. For example if a dose of Revlimid of 10mg daily causes a negative reaction than you can lower the dose to 5 mg.

    Evidence-based integrative therapies:

    There are a number of well-researched, non-conventional therapies that have been shown to increase the efficacy of a specific chemo (Revlimid again) while reducing possible side effects.

    Complementary therapies:

    Frequent, moderate exercise is an excellent example of an anti-MM complimentary therapy. As a MMer myself I have researched and practice an anti-MM program daily, weekly, etc. All non-toxic. All based on research studies.

    The blood test that you refer to is probably a serum protein electrophoresis- while your numbers increased a bit they are still low relatively speaking.

    My overall point is that you can focus on both length of life and quality of life by combining conventional and non-conventional therapies.

    If you would like to talk more please switch to my email address David.PeopleBeatingCancer@gmail.com– email is easier for communication.

    David Emerson
    MM Survivor, MM Cancer Coach

    Reply
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Ron says 5 years ago

My breast cancer recently came back after being in remission for 16 years, I am a 70 year old MALE, doctors say it is very treatable, been on two chemo pills for 6 weeks now, plus cannibals oil that was recommended by my oncologist, going for another petscan oct 3, will keep you updated !

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Ron-

    Yes, please keep me posted.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Mich says 5 years ago

Hello and congrats on your survival! I was a 2 time cancer survivor. I am working on my 3rd time survival now. I must say this time I am not as optimistic and I’m letting it get to my head some days.

So, rare cancer at age 8. (Rhabodomyo sarcoma) treated with surgery, chemo (back in the 80s and it was PURE HELL) radiation.

age 28- diagnosed with ovarian cancer stage 3 (borderline-low grade serous micropapillary ). Hysterectomy, chemo (Carbo/taxol) 6 rounds. Then being deemed remission for 10 years and then “cancer free” once the 10 yr mark after chemo hit.

Flash forward to last year. At year 11 was diagnosed with recurrence of Ovarian cancer. Ca-125 at time was 129. I asked what stage and was told by onc.cancer isn’t ‘staged’ but considered ‘reoccurence’. Doing my homework I would be stage 4. It has spread throughout abdomen, onto lower lung and liver. My lymphnodes in neck and groin were tender-and enlarged- but no “masses” inside of them per CT. They were never biopsied. She said treatment would remain same even if nodes were positive.

She states Im resistant to chemo since it came back. ( I feel I wasn’t since it was maybe dormant for 10 years?). She started me on Avastin IV every 21 days. — CT scans after every 6 treatments. CA-125 dropped to 12 (Thank you Jesus!) and the ‘measurable’ tumors were shrinking 0.5 to 1 cm per 6 treatments. But, theyre still there. The last CT showed no shrinkage of tumors this 6 rounds of chemo and CA-125 went up 5 points (30%) which freaks me out. (they aren’t concerned with that number) I’ve read that Avastin only works short term and the cancer figures out how to get around it.

I am a “need proof” kind of person. I have never been into alternative treatments because I worked in med.field for so long and I know that drugs DO work in some cases. Now, I am open to different types of therapy. I just want my cancer to be (of course gone-but if not an option–) controlled so that I may continue living. I DO NOT WANT TO DIE OF CANCER OR ANYTHING RELATED TO IT (chemo etc).

I have essential oils people coming out of woodwork, total vegans saying I’m killing myself, people telling me “sugar feeds cancer as well as dairy”, convert to an alkaline state body etc. I am so torn and don’t know what to think because my Oncologist disputes all of these and has a “good” explanation of why they all wont work.

I have been looking at getting second opinions from John Hopkins, MD Anderson, Ketter memorial and then also possibly a holistic or natural approach dr.

I am open for new approaches for my type of cancer. Please advise what you would do.

I used to be in the “survivor” category. Now, I’m back in the “fighter” category. This fighting is wearing me out!!!

Sincerely,
Mich.

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Is Mich short for Michelle?

    HI Mich-

    And I thought I had been through the cancer ringer. I am impressed with your survival history. I too get down sometimes. A pain in my lower back while getting out of bed will make me wonder if I have relapsed.

    I too am a “need proof” person. While I live a non-FDA approved lifestyle every therapy I take is evidence-based. There is lots of research that supports various therapies that have nothing to do with the FDA.

    Avastin is an anti-angiogenic chemotherapy. It is working. I believe that you should focus on this therapy. I follow an anti-angiogenic lifestyle through nutrition, supplementation, lifestyle and mind-body therapies. The mind-body therapies aren’t anti-angiogenic…

    An example of an anti-angiogenic therapy that is non-toxic is curcumin. Curcumin is anti-angiogenic and is synergistic with avastin.

    I am both a long-term cancer survivor and cancer coach. I work with patients and survivors to research and design evidence-based, non-conventional programs to manage their cancer.

    Let me know if you would like to learn more about cancer coaching. Hang in there.

    Avastin

    David Emerson

    Reply
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Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi 63 year of male-

    I am sorry to read of your PCa diagnosis. Do you have a question?

    David Emerson

    Reply
      Ron says 5 years ago

      Just curious to know how many people try Canabas oil ?

      Reply
        David Emerson says 5 years ago

        Hi Ron-

        This is a good question but there is no way to know for sure.

        David Emerson

        Reply
        c says 4 years ago

        Someone recently mentioned that to me—that it has some evidence based outcomes? also CBD?? is that the same thing? I also heard about Turkey Tail Mushroom achieving some good outcomes in trials. Do you know about any truth to any of that?

        Reply
          David Emerson says 4 years ago

          Yes, turkey tail mushroom extract has been shown to kill PCa.

          As I mentioned in my previous email, there are a number of evidence-based supplements that are cytotoxic to PCa. And yes, Cannabidiol (CBD oil) fights PCa too. Great for pain management depending on the strain and ratio of Cannabinoids and THC.

          The bottom line is that conventional oncology is designed to prescribe conventional FDA approved therapies. Evidence-based but non-conventional therapies such as CBD oil, mushrooms, curcumin, anti-PCa nutrition, lifestyle therapies, non-toxic bone therapies, etc. all are outside the expertise of conventional oncology. I am both a long-term cancer survivor and cancer coach.

          Let me know if you have any questions.

          David

          Reply
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Jerry Hartford says 5 years ago

Hi, my dad has stage 2 bladder cancer it’s in the muscle now. First they said it would have to be removed along with the prostate. Then later another doctor said he has two options. Chemotherapy with 50%chance or remove it and wear a bag. He decided on removal. But last year he had 3 blocked arteries and had 3 stints put in. His heart doctor said he wouldn’t make it through the 5-6 hour surgery that he would die on the table. There has to be something else besides chemo.

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Jerry-

    If I understand your email, your dad’s recommended therapy for stage 2 bladder cancer was Radical cystectomy (bladder removal). Due to the condition of your dad’s heart function, his cardiologist has recommended against bladder removal surgery. You don’t like the chemotherapy option and are looking for other options/therapies for your dad’s bladder cancer?

    The key issue for you and your dad is what his oncologist meant when he talked about “chemo” as a therapy. The study linked below refers to two different chemo cocktails. As you will read, both cocktails are valid treatments for your dad’s cancer. However, there are different integrative therapies available depending on which chemo your dad has.

    An example of an integrative therapy would be a chemo drug called cisplatin and an antioxidant called curcumin. Integrative therapies will enhance the effectiveness of the chemo regimens (depending on which chemo you choose) as well as reduce the toxicity which is important for your dad.

    Curcumin reduces cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells.

    Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Systemic Review and Two-Step Meta-Analysis.

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Bella says 5 years ago

I been diagnosed with cervical cancer. The doctor told me I have only a few months. I do not have any side effects which told me. I am looking into
LRHT hyperthermica, high dose vitamin c, mistletoe.
Could you please answer me and tell me what you think or maybe you know
other options. Thank you

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Bella-

    My apologies for this tardy reply. I am sorry to read of your cancer diagnosis. Personally I don’t believe oncologists should give dire prognoses. I was told I was terminal in 1997. Boy was she wrong…

    Ironically, by giving you a grim prognosis your oncologist may have done you a favor. It meant that the standard of care techniques for your cancer and stage would not have resulted in a positive outcome.

    As the two articles linked below indicate, a combination of intravenous vitamin C therapy and deep tissue hyperthermia may result in the positive outcome that you are looking for.

    Your challenge will be 1) to find those cancer centers that have expertise in these two therapies and 2) getting your health insurance to pay for these therapies.

    According to my research Mistletoe helps people cope with side effects more than it actually fights cancer.

    I am both a long-time cancer survivor and cancer coach. My value would be in finding institutions with the experience you are looking for as well as researching and presenting those evidence-based therapies that are cytotoxic to cervical cancer. Among other therapies I will recommend anti-angiogenic nutrition, supplementation, anti-cancer lifestyle therapies and mind-body therapies.

    Let me know if you would like to learn more about Cancer Coaching. Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Intravenous Vit. C and chemotherapy

    Cervical cancer: radiotherapy and hyperthermia.

    Reply
Eric Schuttler says 5 years ago

Hi David! I’m a 45-y.o. male who has been diagnosed with colorectal cancer (stage 4, metastasized to liver) 7 mos ago and after 6 months of chemo, my colon has returned to normal appearance and function and the tumors I have in the liver have also responded to treatment, but my liver surgeon wants me to have radioembolization soon, as my liver still has enough tiny calcified spots of cancer interspersed throughout to make surgery / resection impossible at this time. So he wants to go after the handful of tumors on both sides of the liver.

I’m looking for a second (or third) opinion on whether this is the right way to go.

Scans have shown no cancer outside of the liver; I’d rather not go thru more chemo but I imagine I will eventually. I’ve been taking a couple of supplements (Renafood, Drenamin) but that’s about it so far. Been feeling good throughout the treatments and have been maintaining a positive attitude from the beginning, I just wanted to make sure radioembolization is the correct next step to take. Thanks for your help!

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    HI Eric-

    Several things. First of all, I need a little more time to research your questions. I am amazed that you are doing as well as you are considering your original diagnosis. Next, you know that I am not a certified onc. I am a knowledgable cancer survivor but not an oncologist of any kind. Lastly, what were the names of the chemotherapies that you underwent?

    Yes, you should get a second opinion- ideally from an oncologist who will understand you cancer and your therapies. And yes, I will give you a different kind of second opinion. Get both.

    This may be a stupid question but are the “handful of tumors on both SIDES of the liver” on the outside of the liver? Is so why can’t the onc. cut them out with regular surgical techniques?

    I will do some more research. Please answer the questions above.

    thanks

    David Emerson

    Reply
      Eric Schuttler says 5 years ago

      Hi David, thanks for the quick reply!

      I looked at my notes and here’s what I was taking during the first round of 6 treatments (infusion every 2 weeks):

      500mg Avastin
      900mg Adrucil
      896mg Leucovorin
      190 mg Eloxatin

      and then I’d have about 300ml of FU-5 (fluorouracil) in a pump that dispenses over 46 hrs afterwards.

      In Jan, I had CT scans done and it was determined since I handled the chemo without too much trouble, that I should do another round of 6 infusions with additional chemo, but I still need to find out what was added along to the above list.

      To clarify, I meant both halves of my liver, not sides. Sorry about the choice of words there.

      There are small tumors interspersed throughout and that seems to be why my liver surgeon is recommending radioembolization, after all the chemo I’ve had. I’ve learned that this procedure will rule out surgery in the future, so after speaking with an oncologist at Sloan-Kettering last night, I am getting a sense that my case might need a surgeon with more experience to review my scans and determine whether I truly am currently inoperable, or whether my current surgeon is just uncomfortable with the state of my liver.

      it doesn’t matter whether you have capital letters after your name, the energy you’re giving freely to other cancer patients with your research and this blog is much appreciated and noted.
      Thanks again, Eric

      Reply
        David Emerson says 5 years ago

        Hi Eric-

        To summarize- stage 4 colon cancer has been satisfactorily managed. I don’t want to use the word cure but you underwent a great deal of toxicity and your original cancer seems to be under control. Further, your supplementation of Renafood and Drenamin, also seems to be helping (don’t stop).

        The last piece of your therapy picture is how best to further remove small tumors in your liver. Surgery is out. More chemo is out. Based on the studies below, radio embolism seems to be a reasonable choice meaning should eliminate the tumors with few side effects.

        Radioembolization of Liver Metastases in Patients With Colorectal Cancer: A Nonsurgical Treatment With Combined Modality Potential

        Radioembolism for liver mets in BC patients

        The only other therapy I can think of is to research and undergo evidence-based non-toxic therapies. I supplement with milk thistle to keep my liver healthy. There are other liver therapies for you to consider.

        Thank you for your kind words about me helping cancer patients. Keep in mind that I run this non-profit both with corporate, grand making foundations couple with revenues from my cancer coaching. Thanks.

        Let me know if you have any questions. Thanks.

        David Emerson

        Reply
Nora Burnham says 5 years ago

I was recently diagnosed with Stage 1c Epithelial Ovarian Cancer, with two tumors. One on left, called Serous high -grade carcinoma and one on right called Endometrioid adenocarcinoma. Both were large and removed, along with uterus, cervix, 9 groin lymph nodes and 5 periaortic lymph nodes and peritoneal lining. Nothing else showed up anywhere else. Lucky, huh?! The doc wants me to do 6sessions of chemo.
So I want to go alternative ways, but am open to what you have to say.
Thanks, NB, CA
Please leave my full name off when you respond.

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Nora-

    I am sorry to read of your ovarian cancer diagnosis. If I read your comments as well as the study excerpted below I believe your risk of relapse is extremely low. Further, it doesn’t seem as though chemotherapy will reduce the risk of relapse enough to offset the collateral damage aka side effects.

    When you say “I want to go alternative ways…” I take you to mean that you want to undergo non-toxic or “natural” therapies that will both enhance your immune health while reduce your risks of relapse? I couldn’t tell if you were serious when you said “lucky, huh?” But in a way, you may be lucky. The clean living you follow in the coming years, if you choose to, may result in a better, longer life…

    If this is the case then you can research and undergo those therapies that you believe will help you or you can follow those nutritional, supplement-based, lifestyle and mind-body therapies that I research and present to you. I say “present” because I try not to tell cancer patients what to do. I present studies and make recommendations based on research and my own experience as a long-term cancer survivor and you then decide what is best for you.

    I am both a long-term cancer survivor who lives an anti-cancer lifestyle based on my research, as well as a cancer coach. Let me know if you would like to learn more about my cancer coaching.

    Thanks,

    David Emerson

    Prognostic Factors in Patients With Stage I Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

    We analyzed factors predictive of relapse risk in patients with stage I invasive epithelial ovarian cancer: 252 patients from the Princess Margaret Hospital provided a data base for hypothesis generation, and data on 267 patients from the Norwegian Radium Hospital were used for hypothesis testing. The outcomes in most analyses in the two series were very similar, validating the following conclusions. Differentiation (grade) was the most powerful predictor of relapse, followed by dense adherence (which resulted in outcomes equivalent to those in stage II) and, finally, large-volume ascites. When the effects of these three factors were accounted for, then none of the following were prognostic: bilaterality (stage Ib), cyst rupture (stage Ic), capsular penetration (stage Ic), tumor size, histologic subtype, patient age, year of diagnosis, and postoperative therapy. These results allow simplification of stage I substaging, as only differentiation, dense adherence, and large-volume ascites (? peritoneal cytology) need be considered. The 5-year relapse-free rate was 98% in patients with grade 1 tumors in whom both dense adherence and large-volume ascites were absent. These patients are adequately treated by operation alone. Although the relapse risk was high enough in the remaining patients to warrant postoperative treatment, a significant benefit could be shown only for a small subset of patients, namely those with densely adherent tumors treated with abdominopelvic radiotherapy. In grades 2 and 3, none of the therapies used in either series was superior to pelvic radiotherapy or operation alone.”

    Reply
Stephanie says 5 years ago

Hi I’m 23 years old just recently relapsed from hodgkins lymphoma. They want to give me a potent intense chemo along with astem cell transplant. I’ve decided to seek other alternative options. Do you have anything in mind specifically for lymphoma?

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    HI Stephanie-

    Your choices of therapies be they conventional or non-conventional, will be based somewhat on your stage and symptoms. In other words I need to know more about your NHL situation to do more research and to then give you some choices. You are way ahead of the game currently simply by being young and otherwise healthy.

    What stage are you based on your relapse? What, if any symptoms are you experiencing?

    thanks

    David Emerson

    Reply
Julie says 5 years ago

Hi, I am a 48 year woman diagnosed with stage 2A TNBC in left breast, no lymph involvement and clear margins, in Nov. 2015. I had a double mastectomy in Dec., followed in Feb. by chemotherapy 4xDD AC and then planned for 12X weekly paclitaxel. Unfortunately, after the third treatment of paclitaxel, I had the side effect of lung toxicity reaction that resulted in infection – pneumonia (no sign of cancer) and am currently being treated by steroids to treat the lungs and everything is on hold. I have been told that there may not be any other options for chemo treatment if the paclitaxel is deemed to be too risky to retry from a lung perspective (they are looking at pab-paclitaxel) which is a concern for me from TNBC perspective. Radiation is planned after chemo.

Do you have any other suggestions? I am also interested in other therapies – I have already switched to cancer-fighting diet, moderate exercise, meditation and had been coping well with chemo up until pneumonia. Thanks

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Julie-

    I am sorry to read of your TNBC diagnosis. To confirm, your triple negative BC was localized aka no node involvement? You had 4 time dose dense adriamycin and cytoxan? And after the third round of paclitaxel you developed pneumonia and are on hold?

    Yes, I have several suggestions. Before I begin, I am going to have to be honest with you. Julie, you have undergone a TREMENDOUS amount of chemotherapy aka toxicity. I know that at 48 your are pretty young as cancer patients go but jeez. Understand that my perspective and experience is that of a long-term cancer survivor who has experienced many long-term and late stage side effects from my own chemo years ago.

    My approach as a cancer coach is to manage chemo toxicity where ever and when ever possible. Meaning, if you choose to continue with paclitaxel I would suggest taking those non-toxic interegrative therapies that studies have shown enhance the efficacy while reducing toxicity of paclitaxel. I will link an example below.

    Your other option is based on the idea that your oncologists are giving you so much chemotherapy because TNBC relapses more often than other forms of BC do. The trouble is, as I see it, by giving you so much chemo NOW, your TNBC may become chemo resistant, giving you no options later.

    There are are many evidence-based BC supplements that are cytoxic to BC. I believe your therapy plan should include anti-BC nutrition, supplementation, lifestyle (yes moderate but frequent exercise for example) and even mind-body therapies. My cancer is different from your but I do all the above and I have been in CR since 1999. Myeloma survivors (my cancer) learn to live with their cancer for years. Please read the article about this idea in the medscape article below.

    An Evolutionary Approach: Learning to Live With Cancer

    Potentiation of paclitaxel activity by curcumin in human breast cancer cell by modulating apoptosis and inhibiting EGFR signaling.
    “Overall, our data described the promising therapeutic potential and underlying mechanisms of combining paclitaxel with curcumin in treating breast cancer.”

    Julie, I am a long term cancer survivor and cancer coach. Let me know if you would like to learn more about cancer coaching for you.

    thanks and hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Jeff P. says 5 years ago

I’ve recently (6 mos ago)been diagnosed with metastasized kidney cancer in my lungs after having had a radical nephrectomy. It’s very small right now and my onc doesn’t foresee any treatment for 6-12 mos. I’ve given up red meat, sugar and most carbs. I’m exercising daily and taking fish oil, curcumin, CoQ10, green tea extract, quercetin, D3, milk thistle extract and resveratrol. I have another CT scheduled in a couple of weeks. My question is, do you see any health benefits in adding flaxseed to my diet? What other additions or deletions would you suggest?

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Jeff-

    I am sorry to read of your metastatic kidney cancer. However I have to say you are doing everything I know of to reduce the spot in your lung? And a relapse of kidney cancer too.

    Your questions “do you see any health benefits in adding flaxseed to my diet? What other additions or deletions would you suggest?” Flax seed is another form of omega 3 fatty acids. Since you are already taking fish oil I don’t see the need to take more.

    According to the study linked below, yes, omega 3 fatty acids reduce the risk of kidney cancer (scroll down about half way…)

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2863302/

    In order to speak to adding or deleting any of the supplements that you are currently taking I would have to research each. However I take most every supplement you mention so my guess would be that each provides some anti cancer benefit.

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson

    Reply
MICHAEL GEORGE says 5 years ago

I HAVE BEEN DIAGNOSED WITH GLEASON 6 PROSTATE CANCER WHICH THE MRI INDICATES IS CONTAINED WITHIN THE PROSTATE GLAND. MY PSA ON FEB 4 WAS 6.0. MY UROLOGIST SUGGESTED “WATCHFUL WAITING” AND NO ALARM OR ACTION. ON APRIL 27 WAS PSA WAS 8.1. I WILL GET A SECOND OPINION.

QUESTION: SHOULD I CONSIDER PROTON THERAPY INSTEAD OF SURGERY?

Reply
karen says 5 years ago

my son is 14 and diagnosed with Pre-B ALL he started chemo treatment on Dec 31 2015.Doctors told us at the begining of Feb.he was already in remission but protocol calls for intense treatment for 6,8 mths then 2 years of maintenance.As any parent Im scared of what the chemo can do and realy i dont understand why they have to hit my son so hard with chemo. can you help me to understand why if hes in remission cant the chemo stop

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Karen- I am in the process of replying to you now-

    David

    Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Karen-

    I am not an expert on pediatric pre-B ALL so this is my opinion as an long-term cancer survivor of an adult blood cancer. I believe you have reason to be scared.

    My experience with conventional oncology is that specific protocols have been tested and approved by the FDA. Only by following the protocol for pediatric B ALL are the oncologists able to be relatively sure of the outcome. This outcome is a long-term remission I assume.

    Yes, “intense treatment” of chemotherapy will increase the documented risks of late-stage and long term collateral damage. I cannot sugar coat this as I myself suffer from long-term and late stage side effects from my own therapy in ’95-’97.

    I will say however that I follow a regimen of non-toxic therapies that research shows will reduce the risk of relapse or manage my side effects. In other words, there are a variety of non-toxic therapies that your son can undergo once his active therapies stop.

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Shona says 5 years ago

Mom had breast cancer 2 years ago and it’s come back last week as a secondary distant cancer in the fluid around her lung and no where else at present. The original cancer was triple negative breast cancer stage 2 in March 2014.
It’s now been diagnosed as Stage 4 Adenocarcinoma and Metastatic with a Malignant Pleural Effusion. According to her doctor, it’s incurable and patients survive from a few months to up to a year or sometimes 1 year and a half.
Any suggestions are welcome.

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Shona-

    I am sorry to read of your mom’s stage 4 BC relapse. Triple Negative BC is difficult because it relapses more than other cancers. Once BC relapses it cannot be cured.

    However I would like to present an approach to managing your mom’s cancer that is common with my cancer, multiple myeloma but NOT common with your mom’s cancer. Since it is difficult to discuss complicated therapies in emails, I hope that you will ask me lots of questions in future emails.

    Did your mom have a chemotherapy called paclitaxel when she was first diagnosed with BC? The article linked below talks about controling your mom’s cancer with a series of low-dose administrations of paclitaxel.

    An Evolutionary Approach: Learning to Live With Cancer

    Further, the study linked below talks about how an antioxidant called curcumin ENHANCES the efficacy of paclitaxel.

    Liposomal co-delivery of curcumin and albumin/paclitaxel nanoparticle for enhanced synergistic antitumor efficacy.

    At the same time your mom undergoes low-dose paclitaxel and curcumin I would like you to consider having your mom also undergoing several non-toxic therapies shown to also fight triple negative breast cancer.

    Shona, I was told I was terminal in 1997. Had I listened to my oncologist at the time I would be dead now. Please don’t listen only to your mom’s oncologist.

    Let me know what you think.

    David Emerson
    Cancer Survivor and Cancer Coach

    Reply
Alex says 5 years ago

Hi David,

It is a case of 28 year old woman, diagnosed with cervical/uterus cancer, who underwent surgery 2 weeks ago. Biopsy showed cancer cells in lymph nodes. Doctors advised she would have to undergo radiation therapy after about 1.5 months, and possibly chemotherapy, too. She wants to try any possible alternative methods to avoid these two. She has already started some with soda bicarbonate. She is considering also high dosages of Liposomal Vitamin C (e.g., Lypo-Spheric by LivOn Labs), but is concerned that they can interfere because of opposite pH (alkaline vs. acidic).

Your advice is much appreciated!

Thank you!

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Alex,

    I agree that there are non-toxic therapies to undergo before chemo and radiation. However I also recommend integrative therapies to those cancer patients I cancer coach. In other words, my research and personal experience has taught me that both enhancing chemo/radiation while reducing collateral damage aka side effects of toxic therapies should be a cancer patient’s primary focus.

    Thanks and hang in there,

    David Emerson
    Long-term Cancer Survivor and Cancer Coach

    Reply
Scott M says 5 years ago

I have two types of Leukemia. One is Essential Thrombocytosis, where my platelets are manufactured like crazy. This seems to be getting under control. The second kind is CLL (chronic Lymphatic Leukemia) With that, I am at stage 0. I have been trying a ketogenic diet, coffee enemas, and infra-red sauna. I am still losing too much weight, but could that be from all these things I’m doing? I’m also hearing way too many conflicting arguments on what the best diet is. SO confused and getting pretty scared. What do you think?

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Scott-

    I have to be honest with you. Your diagnosis of two types of leukemia is complicated enough that it is over my head. My experience would say that a ketogenic diet, coffee enemas, etc. are excellent forms of therapy. However, I just don’t have any experience with a person with two leukemias.

    If, as you say you feel as if you are getting the ET under control and then if the CLL is stage 0 then I think you are doing well. I am not surprised that you are confused. Blood cancers are complicated.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Eileen says 5 years ago

I am a 50 year old female diagnosed with colon cancer after routine colonoscopy. I had a right hemi colectomy where colon lymph nodes were removed. Should I have chemo if only a few lymph nodes end up being positive? Chemo seems like such a toxic option if it’s only a few lymph nodes.

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Eileen-

    I am sorry to read of your colon cancer diagnosis. Cancer therapies are based on cancer diagnoses- a certain therapy for stage 1, stage 2, etc. If a cancer is contained in an organ such as your colon, then it is contained and may not required therapy beyond surgery. Once a cancer shows up outside an organ, in a lymph node for instance, it means that the cancer has spread.

    The bad news is that your cancer has spread beyond your colon. The good news is that there are non-toxic therapies that work to enhance and or reduce the toxicity of whatever chemotherapy you undergo. An example would be a common chemotherapy for colon cancer called 5-fu (5-fluorouracil) and the integrative therapy would be curcumin-

    Curcumin mediates chemosensitization to 5-fluorouracil through miRNA-induced suppression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in chemoresistant colorectal cancer.

    Those two therapies are examples but there are others. Keep in mind that there are other completementary therapies that studies have show to reduce the side effects of chemotherapy.

    My point is that chemotherapy does not need to by a toxic, side effect causing horror show. I’m not saying that integrative/complementary therapies make chemo easy. I’m saying that there is a middle ground.

    If you would like to learn more please ask your oncologist what chemotherapy regimen he/she recommends for you. I will research integrative therapies for you to consider.

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson
    Cancer Survivor, Cancer Coach

    Reply
      Eileen says 5 years ago

      Hi David,

      I have begun chemo for stage 3 colon cancer, stage 2 removed tumor. 3 of 31 lymph nodes had cancer. Doctor has said I can take curcumin, but I don’t know what form or how much it is recommended to take. It’s not an official recommendation from the doctor, so wondering if you can give me insite. On 5-fu,oxaliplatin, and leucovorin.
      Thanks,
      Eileen

      Reply
Vanessa Severe says 5 years ago

My grand daughter was diagnosed at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Jan 2015 with stage 3 & 4 Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. Witching the 1st month they gave her MRSA n a month long hospital stay that made her deathly ill. She completed her 1st round of Chemo n 6 months later diagnosed as “Cancer Free” but still has a 10 X 11 cm mass on her heart. She has never wanted to take any of the horrible Cancer drugs that traditional medicine has to offer. Problem #1 Children’s Mercy has hot lined many families for seeking second opinions or deciding to decline their treatments. Often these children are being taken away from their families, and parents being arrested. Problem #2 How can my grand daughter be Dx.. As “Cancer Free” if she still has a mass on her heart? Problem #3 The hospitals suggestion is now “Radiation” I know as a nurse the Radiation is a “Death Sentence”. How can we protect my grand daughter from Children’s Mercy Hospital n not have her taken by DFS and get her cancer cured naturally? Plz help! I am desperate! Thanks in advance!

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Venessa-

    I am sorry to read of your grand daughter’s health challenges. While I have some understanding as to how complicated and difficult your decision-making must be I am afraid I am not experienced enough with pediatric blood cancers to offer any help.

    Good luck,

    David Emerson

    Reply
      Mario says 5 years ago

      I went to see my oncologist april 11-2016;this is 2 years now that he has been seing me.After i got really upset about his very poor communicative skills,becouse after 1 1/2 finally he told me that i had MGUS-,next visit he said i had multimyloma,
      2 months later i had myloma;yesterday he gave me a death penalty”YOU HAVE STAGE 4 LYMPHOMA AND WE MUST START CHEMO++++ IMMEDIATELy,BECOUSE THE LONGER WE WAITH-THE WORST IT WILL GET!!!!!!””I told him,that this is a very poor way of incompetence and communication;i am going to try the IPPOCRATIS WAY(NATURAL CURE AND REMEDIES) and i will take as long as i need,and if i die………..”BETTER THE IPPOCRATIS WAY THEN THE”CHEMO” WAY!!!””” I have ordered a 3 month supply of “” STEMCELLS””I am a vegetaeian and a firm beliver of natural health remedies………..i take an average of 16 vitanins a day……I don’t yet know what to use to cure and maybe destroy ..this lymphoma………ANY HELP WOULD BE VERY MUCH APPRECIATED..THANK YOU ONE AND ALL…………MARIO PS> I AM SEING A NEW ONCOLOGIST EARLY NEXT MONTH.

      Reply
        Yvette Gipson says 4 years ago

        you should read about the Bud Wig protocol and Artemisinin for all cancers…

        Reply
          David Emerson says 4 years ago

          Hi Yvette-

          Yes, I have researched and written about both therapies.

          thanks,

          David Emerson

          Reply
adele barbre says 5 years ago

MY Mum had agressive chemo to treat cervical cancer, they also removed some of her bowel…6 months later its now in her bones and liver and her oncologist has told her that there is nothing else they can do – she wanted to try the Holt method of radio wave therapy but no one seems to practice this – what can you suggest – she is 64, always been fit and healthy -please, please can you help us, suggest something, anything

kind regards – Adele

Reply
    adele barbre says 5 years ago

    please let me know if you need any more info – thanks

    Reply
      David Emerson says 5 years ago

      Adele- (great name…)

      Please read my previous email.

      David

      Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Adele-

    I am sorry to read of your mother’s metastatic cervical cancer. Since you expressed interest in the Holt Cancer Therapy and since you sound like you live in England, I have linked the Holt Foundation below. If you go to the website you can get the address and phone number of the foundation in Warrenton, England.

    If you choose not to pursue the Holt therapy I can research and provide anti-colon therapies to include nutrition, supplementation, lifestyle and mind-body therapies all evidence based, researched to confirm they are cytotoxic (kill) colon cancer. I am a cancer coach as well as a long-term cancer survivor.

    http://www.jhcancersupport.com

    Thanks and give my best to your mom.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Kim says 5 years ago

Hi David,
My fiance has been diagnosed with adrenal carcinoma. It is in his esophagus and more. He is 62 yo.
Kim

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Kim-

    I am sorry to read of your fiancee’s cancer diagnosis. If I read your email correctly, the cancer began in his esophagus and metastasized (spread) to one of his adrenal glands.

    If the above it true then your situation is rare. Your fiancee is relatively young compared to the average cancer survivor and therefore has a lot to live for. However, the two of you may want unbiased support in thinking through the decisions you will face in the days and weeks ahead.

    I am not experienced in this type of cancer. I do however encourage you to get a second opinion. Let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Deb Peterson says 5 years ago

I have recently been told about UMAC CORE phyton plankton to be effective but am still learning about it, are you aware of this product. It comes from British Columbia. I have had a ct scan on my left lung as they have found a small lump, but have not recieved the results yet, also lymph nodes in my throat are enlarged. I will not be doing any traditional cancer treatments as I don’t think the pain and suffering is what I want to do. I do know someone who was a client of mine who had stage 4 in her back and lung, she was on supplements and ate organic, and stayed away from proteins and sugar. She passed 1yr ago but had 7yrs of great quality of life with only one round of radiation, I want to follow her path. Her Dr. was Dr. Gonzales in New York and he uses supplements and purges.

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Deb-

    Please let me know if you are diagnosed with lung cancer. While phytoplankton, blue green algae, etc. are important immune boosting superfoods, there are supplements that research has shown to be cytotoxic to lung cancer. An example is milk thistle/silibinin.

    While I understand not wanting to undergo traditional chemotherapy of any kind please understand that there are many integrative therapies that can both enhance the efficacy of a chemotherapy while reducing its toxicity.

    Negative review of UMAC CORE

    My point is that you need to know your opinions to make the best decisions.

    Let me know if I can help.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Anne Houselog says 5 years ago

My mother is 85 years old and was in excellent health until 2/8/16 when she was found to have lesions/tumors in her brain. We opted for radiation of the brain, she does not want chemo and we did not want surgery before the radiation, the 2 tumors were large and causing confusion/dymentia like symptoms for her. They told us she could stroke out during surgery and we had to shrink the tumors quickly. After 14 radiation treatments, she is mentally back to normal, but is failing fast physically. The doctors were not sure if the tumors were lymphoma or an aggressive cancer. She had a body scan done and no other tumors were found in her chest, abdomen or pelvic areas. I find it difficult to do nothing as she continues to fail, what would you suggest to get her stronger? How would you procede from here as far as treatment? We do have an MRI scheduled next week to look at her brain to see if the tumors are gone, we were told we had to wait until 2 months after her radiation ended so the brain could heal a bit.

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Anne-

    I am sorry to read of your mom’s cancer diagnosis. Without a specific diagnosis (brain cancer or lymphoma) it is difficult for me to give you any advice. I don’t believe there is any curative therapy available to you. Therefore your focus should be on quality of life-in my opinion.

    I will not speak to you as a cancer coach but as a son/caregiver. If it was my mom I would work to do three things.

    First of all, radiation is debilitating even to young people. I would try to boost her energy and immune system in every way. Healthy foods, immune boosting non-conventional therapies, restful sleep (melatonin), mild exercise if possible (walks around the block?). Lifestyle therapies.

    Secondly I would learn about and pursue palliative therapy for my mom. There are physicians who specialize in managing the side effects of cancer. This is NOT hospice though you may need hospice care at some point. A growing number of studies show that early palliative care can result in longer lives.

    Lastly I would try to figure out how my mom wanted to spend her time. I don’t think most people want to specifically talk about “end of life” pursuits but this is what I am thinking about. It might be as simple as spending time with family and friends. It might be something like talking to a sister or family member that your mom had a falling out with a long time ago.

    Anne, I’ve worked with people who push toxic therapies on the parents they are caregiving in the hope for a “cure.” While I understand the desire or intention, I know enough about cancer to understand the limits of conventional cancer care. Aggressive treatment is highly toxic.

    I hope this helps. Let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson

    Reply
jerry keenan says 5 years ago

david my wife has stage 4 colon cancershe had an mri and a cat scan and was found to have spread to her liver they want to give her 5 radiation treatments then cemo she is 76 and was very healthy and active.we need help

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Jerry-

    I am sorry to read of your wife’s metastatic colon cancer. Your wife’s health and active lifestyle should help her in the coming weeks and months.

    I will be direct. I encourage you and your wife to take an integrative approach to her therapy. This means that she take supplements that research has shown can enhance her chemo and radiation while reducing its toxicity.

    An example would be “integrative” therapy for a possible colon cancer chemotherapy called 5-FU.

    Curcumin Chemosensitizes 5-Fluorouracil Resistant MMR-Deficient Human Colon Cancer Cells in High Density Cultures

    Chemotherapy and radiation are needed to attack an advanced cancer and stage such as colon cancer stage 4. Yet, with out integrative therapies the toxicity that you wife endures will be difficult.

    I would also recommend anti-angiogenic nutrition, lifestyle therapies and mind-body therapies, again, all evidence-based.

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Steve Good says 5 years ago

Hi
Your responses are worthwhile intelligent guesses. My review us from having just gone thru treatment for prostrate cancer. And still getting ADT therapy and your comments to people with this cancer.
So after I get my mm diagnosis I will contact you.
Thanks. Steve

Reply
Nancy Hendrix says 5 years ago

Hi David,/
I had breast cancer three years ago and had a mastectomy and four rounds of chemo. All seemed well. In February of this year I was diagnosed with colon cancer. Twelve inches of colon was removed, as well as, 23 lymph nodes which were all determined to be “clear.” Since I had had breast cancer before, a PET scan was performed to see if any other areas of cancer showed up. Sure enough, there is a small spot on my lung. The current plan is to do radiation for the lung.
A friend of mine told me about 35% food grade hydrogen peroxide taken with distilled water. Are you familiar with this? Another friend recommended alkaline water, and my cousin swears by a tea that he brews from a product he can only get on line. What are your thoughts?

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Nancy-

    I am sorry to learn of your original BC diagnosis and doubly sorry to learn of either your BC metastasis (spread to your lung/colon) or secondary cancers. The good news is that the colon and lung cancers appear to be contained.

    Since you asked, I will give you my thoughts. In short, you have a lot of work to do. It is my belief that you will need to employ both conventional (FDA approved) and non-conventional therapies in order to maintain the highest quality of life while you work for the greatest length of life. Any cancer can be curable.

    As you can see from the links below, you have lots of information to consider.

    I am both a long-term cancer survivor of an “incurable cancer” and a cancer coach. I can help you figure out your options. Yes, I ask for a reasonable donation to PeopleBeatingCancer, a 501c3 non-profit. This is a tax deductible donation and is fully refundable.

    Beat cancer with 35% hydrogen peroxide

    Is Alkaline Water Extra Healthy or a Hoax?

    Let me know if you have any questions. Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
chris says 5 years ago

my wife ( age 47 ) was diagnosed with stage four non small cell carcinoma lung cancer ,1 1/2 years ago. she has had some radiation, and has been on dna targeting ( one pill a night ) she is mostly stable, how ever she has some growth in her bones that gives her pain. they told us they cant cure her. ive been reading about linus pauling, but I cant find anything about the dosages of vitamin c she should take interveiniously. if you can help me , I will be greatful.

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Chris-

    I am sorry to read of your wife’s NSCLC diagnosis. It is good to read, however that she is responding to DNA targeting therapy. I understand that conventional oncology does not have therapy that is curative for your wife but as a person who was also told he was terminal (in ’97), I believe that it is important to research and identify non-conventional (non FDA) evidence-based therapies.

    Intravenous vitamin c therapy is one such therapy. Yes, there are studies citing its success yet it has not been approved by the FDA. The clinic that provides int. vit. c therapy will determine the doses for your wife based on her weight.

    Anti-lung cancer supplementation, nutrition, lifestyle therapies, mind-body therapies, should all have a place in your wife’s treatment. I am a cancer coach who has been providing this type of research to hundred’s of cancer patients for years.

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Flora Margalit says 5 years ago

female, 72 , breast cancer + lymph nodules in armpit. Metastasis to head of femur, radiation and FASLODEX +BONEFOS FOR 2 YEARS. Mid 2014process of metastasis reactivated, to other places of thje skeleton.
2015 frustrated attemts with PALBOCICLIB, XELODA, FEMARA.
Since December 2015 TAXOL, which after 9 sessions of reduced dosis (137mg), reduced a bit the level of absorption of the stuff ingested/inoculated before the PET-CT. Was told to go on with treatment until it stops working OR my body can not bear the side effects anymore. Any suggestions? Thanks

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Flora-

    I am sorry to read that your breast cancer has metastasized to your bones. I don’t mean to sound alarmist in any way but I encourage you to think beyond conventional oncology. I do not mean for you should chase therapies that are not evidence-based. I will offer therapies and studies below.

    My primary suggestion is that you take an “integrative” approach to your treatment. Supplement with those antioxidants that studies have shown will enhance chemotherapy (taxol in this case) while reducing its toxicity. An example of this integrative approach to taxol (paclitaxel) would be curcumin.

    Paclitaxel-sensitization enhanced by curcumin involves down-regulation of nuclear factor-κB and Lin28 in Hep3B cells.

    Further, please learn about and consider anti-BC lifestyle, nutrition, and mind-body therapies. Again, those supported by studies. I can send you information about all the above. I am a long-term cancer survivor myself and coach cancer patients. Yes, I charge money but the registration fee modest ($149) and is a tax-deductible donation to PeopleBeatingCancer, a registered 501c3 nonprofit. The fee is one time only and is fully refundable.

    Let me know if you have any questions. Hang in there,

    David Emerson
    Cancer Survivor, Cancer Coach

    Reply
Kimberly Landreau says 5 years ago

Hi David
My name is Kimberly and I have been diagnosed with breast and Lymph node cancer, grade 3, stage 3A. My chances of it reoccurring without treatment I am told is 70% and half that if I get Chemo and Radiation. My treatment would be 8 treatments of Chemo aggressively and 25 treatments of radiation after Chemo. I am scared. I have had surgery and he took out the tumor from the breast 1.7 cm and 20 lymph nodes and 4 lymph nodes where cancer as well and 1 lymphnode had a tumor of 1.8 both oncologists, and my natural path doctor is saying I need to do this or its a great possibility that this cancer will come back. 🙁

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    HI Kimberly-

    I am sorry to learn of your breast cancer diagnosis. While I agree with your staging of 3A your diagnostic specifics (tumor size, lymph node involvement) indicate that you are early or just barely 3A. Yes, you have a significant risk of recurrence but with the right multimodal mix of therapies you will greatly reduce your chances of relapse.

    Chemo and radiation are toxic therapies and will lead to side effects if you do not learn about integrative therapies to both enhance efficacy and reduce toxicity.

    Examples of integrative therapies for a typical breast cancer chemotherapy, docetaxel for instance, is curcumin.

    Phase I dose escalation trial of docetaxel plus curcumin in patients with advanced and metastatic breast cancer.

    In addition I recommend evidence-based nutritional, anti-BC supplementation, anti-BC lifestyle therapies- all evidence-based meaning all these therapies have been researched and provide studies to read.

    My point Kimberly, is that your oncologists and naturopath are correct. Your stage does have a high risk of relapse. That is why I am encouraging you to include those therapies that studies have shown are cytotoxic to breast cancer and reduce the risk of relapse.

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    thanks and hang in there,

    David Emerson
    Cancer Survivor, Cancer Coach

    Reply
      Kimberly Landreau says 5 years ago

      Hi David
      My name is Kimberly and I have been diagnosed with breast and Lymph node cancer, grade 3, stage 3A. My chances of it reoccurring without treatment I am told is 70% and half that if I get Chemo and Radiation. My treatment would be 8 treatments of Chemo aggressively and 25 treatments of radiation after Chemo. I am scared. I have had surgery and he took out the tumor from the breast 1.7 cm and 20 lymph nodes and 4 lymph nodes where cancer as well and 1 lymphnode had a tumor of 1.8 both oncologists, and my natural path doctor is saying I need to do this or its a great possibility that this cancer will come back. 🙁

      Thank you for the information, I really do appreciate it. Can you tell me how you’ve become so knowledgeable about the different types of cancers. And I will be looking at the therapies you have sent me. My Natural path has set me up with
      Theracurmin-Pro 600 Melatonin working up to 20mg, Coriolus, and a multistrain probiotic. Before surgery she set me up with 4 homeopathy remedies, and after I was on arnica and a couple of others. For emotional support. Also I use essential oils and a good diet, alkaline diet. When I first found out about my cancer, I tried to shrink the tumors with DMSO and a mixture of sodium clorite and citric acid. There was a small difference in size. This method seems to do something but it takes time. This type of cancer doesn’t have that time, but I did what I could until conventional kicked in. Again thanks for the advice. Everything helps.

      Reply
      Kimberly Landreau says 5 years ago

      Hi David

      Are the therapies you are talking about a multi b source, I looked it up on google and I got lost in the language. Can you explain to me a little clearer the supplementation and lifestyle of anti BC.

      Reply
        David Emerson says 5 years ago

        Hi Kimberly-

        I would have to do more research but examples would be supplementation or nutrition that studies indicate are cytotoxic to BC. Your nat. path. recommended theracumin because it kills BC. Actually, curcumin kills BC. Theracumin is a specific formula that studies show is more bioavailable that other curcumin formulas.

        Curcumin induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cells through p53-dependent Bax induction

        An example of a lifestyle therapy that reduces the risk of BC relapse would be frequent, moderate exercise. Both of these therapies are true for MM as well.

        David

        Reply
Frank says 5 years ago

Hit with a PSA of 1,666 first week of 2016. Obviously been growing for a while, metastasis
of spine, legs, neck, etc.

Taking Degarelix (Firmagon) got PSA down to 8.4. Dr. is now saying chemo is next step, which I want to avoid at all costs (only as last resort).

Where is a good place to go for immunotherapy? Suggestions regarding diet? I am a vegetarian. Eat eggs and fish for protein.

Supplements?

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Frank,

    I will be direct with you. I am a cancer coach. Your situation is complex. Not impossible but there is a lot to do.

    I am sorry to read of your prostate cancer (PCa) diagnosis but I am glad to read that you have responded so well to Degarelix. I agree that you should avoid the toxicity of chemotherapy “at all costs” but keep in mind that your options will be limited with a diagnosis of metastasized prostate cancer.

    My point is that you may want to throw all evidence-based therapies at your cancer as you can in an effort to live as long and as well as you can. In my experience, the spectrum of therapies can include chemo, nutrition, non-toxic supplementation, and maybe even some careful local radiation.

    Since you are currently undergoing a chemo treatment your next steps are to:

    1) Understand the possible FDA approved chemotherapies for PCa- Docetaxel (Taxotere) Cabazitaxel (Jevtana) Mitoxantrone (Novantrone)
    Estramustine (Emcyt) for example. All have strengths and weaknesses. All cause short, long-term and possibly late stage side effects. Understanding the possible side effects will enable you to take therapies to either reduce or prevent the collateral damage caused by a specific chemotherapy. An example would be the peripheral neuropathy (tingling, burning) caused by taxotere. Supplementing with omega 3 fatty acids may reduce or eliminates the damaging affects of taxotere.

    2) Understand those therapies that are “integrative” to those FDA approved anti-PCa chemo therapies. An example would be the supplement curcumin enhancing taxotere (docletaxel).

    3) Understand those non-conventional therapies that studies have shown are cytotoxic (kill) PCa. An example would be green tea extract

    4) Understand anti-PCA nutritional therapies- again evidence-based.

    5) Understanding those lifestyle based therapies that either promote bone health or are cytotoxic to PCa.

    6) Understanding evidence-based mind-body therapies that are anti-cancer. These therapies may seem a bit touchy-feely to some people but my role as cancer coach is to do the research, present the information to you and let you decide.

    If you would like evidence-based research about the above therapies please consider hiring me as your cancer coach. To learn more go to-

    PeopleBeatingCancerCoaching.org

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    thanks and hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
karen bruggeman says 5 years ago

I have DCIS with microinvasion 1 had lumpectomey and lymph nodes removed everything looks good…Is there stilll a need for radiatin? Thanks

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Karen-

    Your question ” lumpectomey and lymph nodes removed everything looks good…Is there stilll a need for radiation?” continues to be debated. My personal belief is that local radiation causes as many risks as benefits. But I am not a BC survivor so I can’t say. Please consider having an Oncotype DX assay performed. You will receive a score that will help you decide whether or not to undergo local radiation.

    Oncotype DX for DCIS

    Please consider undergoing those antioxidant supplements, anti-angiogenic nutritional and lifestyle therapies that studies have shown reduce the risk of breast cancer relapse.

    David Emerson
    Survivor, Cancer Coach

    Reply
Pat says 5 years ago

I am 67 and had a hysterectomy 1 year ago, went through radiation last summer and now cancer has spread to other organs. Trying to find a good place in US for alternative cancer treatments to get rid of this nasty disease. Can you help?

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Pat-

    I am sorry to read of your cancer. I’m not sure what you are asking me. Yes, I can research and identify US clinics that administer therapies such as Insulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT). The first step however is for you to consider those conventional and non-conventional therapies to help you manage your cancer.

    In order to provide this information I need to know what cancer and stage you have been diagnosed with/at. Let me know if you want to talk further.

    thanks,

    David Emerson
    Survivor, Cancer Coach

    Reply
Eugene Staudinger says 5 years ago

Hello I have a prostate 17 count. A biopsy shows cancer. Doctor says removal of prostate and potential radiation. Whats your opinion as I know a bit about herbals as my wife is a herbalist retired. I am 64 yrs old in good health otherwise.

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Eugene-

    When you say “prostate of 17 count.” I will assume that you mean you PSA test (prostate specific antigen) indicated a score of 17. The 3 forum post linked below convey that this PSA level is high but not that high.

    When you say that a “biopsy shows cancer” it’s important to note two things. First, most of us over the age of 50 have some cancer growing inside our prostates. Second, the issue then is 1) how MUCH cancer is inside your prostate and 2) how FAST is the cancer growing.

    To determine how much cancer and how fast is your cancer growing, your physician should be able to tell you how many of the cores taken during your biopsy showed cancer. For example, if half of the cores taken during your biopsy showed cancer then your cancer is half as big as your prostate.

    To speak to your question about herbals, yes there are many non-conventional therapies, including herbal supplements that studied show slow or kill prostate cancer. Further, there are studies that also cite anti-prostate cancer nutrition and lifestyle therapies to also kill cancer.

    Eugene, please understand that there will be considerable collateral damage caused by prostatectomy (prostate removal) and radiation. Permanent damage such as urinary incontinence and or erectile disfunction among others.

    The issue then, is to balance your risks with potential side effects. If you can tell me how many “cores” showed cancer I can provide studies that will offer several different therapies to you all that have different levels of risks/ collateral damage.

    If the amount of cancer that is in your prostate then you can watch and wait and undergo non-conventional therapies such as herbal therapies, antioxidant supplements, nutrition and lifestyle supplements.

    My point is that I will provide studies so that you and your wife can make the decisions.

    Let me know what you think. David Emerson

    Others who have PSA of 17

    Reply
Rick Williams says 5 years ago

Thanks for your caring David, 54 year old male, could loose 20 pounds. On digital exam urologist found a small lump on my DRE. I freaked and paid for a MRI (I am Canadian and didnt want to wait in line so I paid). The findings in my MRI:
Radialogist IMPRESSION: 9×5 mm focal lesion seen in the medial right base peripheral zone could represent tumour. PI-RADS 4

I had biopsy – non-specific and all negative.

One year later, no change in the tumour, PSA in NOV2014 0.39/DEC2015 0.26

Now they want me to go have a direct biopsy of the tumour. Is there a chance the needle poke can cause spreading of the cancer cells (
I feel I should leave it for now because everything seems so fine, but I have a lot of living to do and don’t want in 5-10 years someone tell me that I should have had it removed.

Being this small what do you think about that radiation pin pointing ray thing-a-ma-bob work?
your opinion)?

Also In 5 years they can be disclosing NEW treatments rather than radical prostate removal surgery.

Thanks for your time David!!!
Rick

All other blood work is spot on NORMAL 🙂

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Rick-

    Normally I begin my cancer coaching comments with the words “I am sorry to read of…” but in your case you have not be diagnosed with cancer. Frankly I don’t think you have anything to worry about but let me present my thinking below.

    Let me respond to several of your diagnostic issues and then reply to your questions below. As you probably know, all of your diagnostic testing pointed to little if anything for you to worry about. Your PSA of 12/15, 0.26 is lower than 11/14 and is lower than mine…Granted, a PSA test is not a perfect test. But a PSA level of less than 1 is pretty good. Also a non-specific biopsy and normal blood work is pretty good news too.

    It is important to note that most men over 50 (I’m 56) have some sort of lesion growing in their prostate. The question for all of us is whether or not the cells in our prostate will turn aggressive…in our lifetime. Will we die of prostate cancer or something else?

    The only diagnostic indicator that possibly raises a red flag in this regard is your PI-RADS level of 4.

    “PI-RADS 4: high (clinically significant cancer is likely to be present)”

    I will lay out your therapy choices below:

    1) Watchful waiting. No side effects other than possibly worrying. There are a host of inexpensive, evidence-based, non-toxic therapies shown to reduce the risk of prostate cancer. I take several of these myself. I have prostate cancer in my family…

    2) HIFU therapy- this form of therapy was recently approved by the FDA in the US. I don’t know about Canada. Minimal side effects, non-toxic. Worth understanding. I can research the who, what and where is you are interested in learning more about this therapy.

    3) Radiation- yes, several possible long-term side effects. You need to understand the pros and cons of this therapy.

    4) “direct biopsy of the tumour” another diagnostic test depending on the course of therapy. Unlikely to spread cancer but yes, there are documented side effects from biopsies. Further, the main benefit of prostate biopsies is to measure growth of a tumour over time. One biopsy only tells you how big the lesion inside you is. Not how aggressive it is.

    Rick, I think you are okay for now but if you would like to learn more about any or all of the issues in 1-4, please register to become a cancer coaching patient by clicking the blue button-

    I hope to talk with you further. Thanks and hang in there.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Sap says 5 years ago

My father was diagnosed with bladder cancer on new years eve. He had a kidney transplant year and half ago. We are not exactly sure what to do for treatment, can you please help in determining who would be the best person to talk to for conventional and non conventional treatment?

Thank you

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Sap-

    I am sorry to learn of your father’s bladder cancer diagnosis. Your choices of both conventional and non-conventional therapies will depend on several factors. I can make specific recommendations based on your answers to the questions below.

    1) what stage is your dad’s bladder cancer? As you can read from this explanation, early stage bladder cancer is treated much differently then late stage bladder cancer.

    2) what, if any, are his symtoms? How does he feel?

    3) You mentioned that your dad has a kidney transplant 1.5 years ago. What is health like? How old is your dad?

    To put my questions into perspective, I talked with a man recently who had his bladder removed. Tom had extensive surgery but has recovered well. On the other had, if your dad diagnosis is early stage bladder cancer (see the study linked and excerpted below), your dad’s treatment options will be much different.

    Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer risk stratification.

    “Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) comprises about 70% of all newly diagnosed bladder cancer, and includes tumors with stage Ta, T1 and carcinoma in situ (CIS.)…”

    I will try to address your questions based on the info you relay to my questions. Thanks.

    David Emerson

    Reply
sue says 5 years ago

HI THERE
i have Papillary thyroid cancer for one year so far and i did blood test which is CEA and back normal,nothing in my blood , but biopsy said i have cancer I’m on natural bath and doing good. tumor was 2.3 now 1.7 .i have anther one but not cancerous .same size .nodule.
But doctors keep pushing me for surgery and radiation which im not going with ,and saying tumor will not go away .
your advice pleae .
what do you have for this cancer .
and biosey can be wrong ?
I dont believe it is cancer .im doing very good.
Thanks
sue

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Sue-

    While a normal CEA blood test is positive it is not completely conclusive. Please read the content about CEA levels linked and excerpted below.

    I’m not sure what you are saying in the sentence ” but biopsy said i have cancer I’m on natural bath and doing good. tumor was 2.3 now 1.7 .i have anther one but not cancerous .same size .nodule.”

    I think it is possible that you have a small tumor that may never be a health issue. Please understand that I cannot tell you what to do. I am not a medical doctor. Please read the article linked below that cites several studies that examine over diagnosis and over treatment in thyroid cancer.

    Thyroid cancer over-diagnosis and over-treatment- do you care?

    “What are the limitations of CEA testing?

    CEA is not an effective screening test for hidden (occult) cancer since early tumors do not cause significant blood elevations. Also, many tumors never cause an abnormal blood level, even in advanced disease. Because there is variability between results obtained between laboratories, the same laboratory should do repeat testing when monitoring a patient with cancer”

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    Thank you,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Anita Kimball says 5 years ago

Thank you for your website.
I was diagnosed in 9/22/15 with Adenocarcinoma after losing 30 lbs since May 2015 (thought stress).
Since diagnosis I have had 23 treatments of radiation and 5 rounds of chemo. I was on a feeding tube for 2 months.
After the 30 day waiting period, my new scan showed a couple of new cysts on my liver.
My oncologist has now ruled out the esophagectomy and intestinal resection that had been planned.
She wants to start a new palliative rounds of 3 types of chemo on Jan 4, 2016.
She says worst case is a few months but 1-2 years with the new chemo.
Should I go somewhere else for a second opinion? Should I try hemp oil as an alternative? How can I find out if there are trials/options overseas?
Many thanks in advance.
Also, I am 55 y/o and had a gastric sleeve in March 2011. I apparently suffered from silent acid reflux and had absolutely no clue of my problems until I started throwing up. The first biopsy in July came back benign.

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Anita-

    I am sorry to learn of your adenocarcinoma. In order for me to research possible therapies for you I must confirm a few things.

    1) Am I correct in thinking that your diagnosis is “esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC)?

    2) What stage was your original diagnosis?

    3) How is your health otherwise?

    Answers to your questions above until I get additional info are 1) therapies to boost your immune health such as CBD/Hemp oil, frequent, moderate exercise, anti-cancer nutrition/diet, antioxidant supplements in general are good therapies for cancer patients undergoing aggressive therapies such as chemo and radiation. 2) a second opinion is always a good idea. Your prognosis is difficult to determine at this point in time. Talking to another oncologist may help you think through your options.

    Thirdly, palliative therapies, in general, are a good idea at this stage in your cancer experience. Please keep in mind that palliative therapies do NOT preclude curative therapies if you choose. Palliative therapies are simply directed at managing your side effects or symptoms.

    As for overseas therapy options, I can research possible options if you would like. As an example, I researched clinics in Germany and Mexico when I was told that my onc. had nothing more to offer me back in ’97.

    Please answer the questions above if you would like me to provide more info for you.

    In the meantime, hang in there.

    David Emerson

    Reply
      Anita Kimball says 5 years ago

      thank you for responding so quickly!
      My esophageal cancer is located at my lower esophageal sphincter…the reason for my feeding tube for the two months. The treatments shrunk the tumor and I am able to eat soft foods and some other limited things. I was told not to eat meat because it would be too hard but wonder if I could purée some chicken salad…
      I was staged at Stage 2 with 0 node and 0 metastasis is. I was told at my follow up that I was not told originally that I had a couple of liver cysts but that a couple of more had developed and that concerned them. The biopsy revealed the cancer had metasticized to my liver and she wanted to start the palliative chemo Jan 4.
      I tend to be weary. Before diagnosis, I worked almost 70 hours a week – 8-4:30 day job and 5:30-11:00 at my night job. After 15 years of this schedule, I thiught I was just wearing out!
      After the feeding tube was removed, I was told to drink Boost and anything else I could tolerate for the calories….no specific diet to increase my immune system nor “fight” cancer.
      I have purchased a Ninja to blend kale and berries that my ex-husband brought me so as soon as I send this I will add that to my diet….mashed potatoes and green beans can only add so much! And it’s so weird, some days I can keep the beans down, some days I can’t.
      would I have to go to Colorado for hemp oil? I know both Alabama (residence) and Tennessee (Vandy hospital) have seizure studies for hemp oil but which states have cancer studies?
      I appreciate your site and responses to everyone and can only tell you that I want to be around for my grandchildren (13,8,3) for a while longer….my 3 y/o grandson would only know from pictures. So thank you for the information and the hope….I do know it’s not guaranteed but hope is a wonderful thing 🙂

      Reply
        David Emerson says 5 years ago

        Hi Anita-

        Thank you for the additional information about your EC. I will enumerate the issues below in my attempt to answer your questions.

        1) “The biopsy revealed the cancer had metasticized to my liver and she wanted to start the palliative chemo Jan 4.” Yes, the liver cysts indicate that your EC has spread. Palliative chemo is given to minimize side effects or the symptoms of your EC. What side effects or symptoms is your onc. worrying about?

        2) “I tend to be weary. Before diagnosis, I worked almost 70 hours a week – 8-4:30 day job and 5:30-11:00 at my night job. After 15 years of this schedule, I thiught I was just wearing out!”

        In my humble opinion you should not be trying to work long hours while you are healing from cancer therapy all the time trying to rid your body of cancer…

        3) “I have purchased a Ninja to blend kale and berries that my ex-husband brought me so as soon as I send this I will add that to my diet” I too have a ninja. I recommend a smoothie at least once a day. If you cannot eat solid foods you must figure out a way to get nutrition into you system.

        4) “would I have to go to Colorado for hemp oil? I know both Alabama (residence) and Tennessee (Vandy hospital) have seizure studies for hemp oil but which states have cancer studies?”

        The hemp oil that we can purchase online does not have either the CBD or THC content that studies have shown will fight cancer. You are correct, only states where medical marijuana is legal will sell CBD oil with CBD and THC.

        5) “I appreciate your site and responses to everyone and can only tell you that I want to be around for my grandchildren (13,8,3) for a while longer”

        I encourage you to fight your cancer with every tool you can find. Nutrition (smoothies), antioxidant supplementation such as curcumin, resveritrol, green tea extract, omega 3 fatty acids, milk thistle (I take these supplements myself-daily). I recommend daily, moderate exercise, plenty of sleep (melatonin) and laugh a lot.

        Please reply with any/all questions.

        Hang in there

        David Emerson

        Reply
Lida says 5 years ago

Hi David;

My 30 year old brother was diagnosed with Follicular Mycosis fongoides 2 years ago. At first they though it was Mycosis fongoides but after 6 months of therapy which includes phototherapy there was no result (he was told there is no need for chemo in his case) and he was told that was an aggrassive form which is called Follicular mycosis fongoides. He started having big patches all over his body including some tumors on the bottom of his leg. then they put him on Acutan and interferon for another 6 months yet the result was not impressing. After all this time now he is asked to start radiation for 3 weeks on a daily basis following that he would need a chemoteraphy and then stem cell transplant. I was wondering what your opinion would be on that? ! I honestly don’t know who is right and can’t trust them no more. I appreciate your help. Thanks alot

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Lida-

    I am sorry to learn of your brother’s Follicular mycosis fongoides. A cancer diagnosis is difficult and a diagnosis of a rare cancer is even more so. The reason why you don’t feel as if you can trust your oncologists, in my opinion, is because this is a rare form of cancer. As such, there is little research, little experience for your oncs. to follow.

    The therapy path that you describe- phototherapy, acetone, interferon and then more aggressive therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy and possibly a SCT is the path of therapy that is outlined in my research of this form of t-cell lymphoma.

    The only opinion I can offer is to find an oncologist who is as experienced with Follicular mycosis fongoides as possible. My suggestion would be to talk to a cancer center with experience in blood cancers (hematology/oncology). My suggestion would be to search the Dana-Farber website for oncs who have experience with your brother’s cancer.

    To be clear, I am not saying that your current oncs are incorrect with their therapy recommendations. If a phone consult with an experienced hem/onc. at Dana-Farber reveals similar info as what you have already done then you can have confidence in your current oncs.

    Dana-Farber

    Follicular mycosis fongoides

    Please don’t hesitate to ask me additional questions.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Borbor says 5 years ago

My mom has colon cancer. She had about a foot of her colon removed. She is now going thru chemo. I saw a video about a drug that is quit old, called DCA. In tests done in mice, it showed that DCA forces the cancer cells to basically commit suicide. The problem is that no drug company owns the patent for it. I was wondering what could be done to have the cancer foundations to research this drug. They keep advertising on TV all these cancer foundations and such. Yet noone actually want a cure. So what could be done, through petitions etc., to have people act on these easy cures?

Reply
    Borbor says 5 years ago

    I meant the foundation to act on funding research for those easy cures.

    Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Borbor-

    When you talk about “easy cures” or specific therapies such as DCA you are highlighting one of the greatest debates in cancer care today. You are correct when you say that Foundations frequently talk about “research” but then don’t do any research on those therapies that are controversial.

    As for your question “So what could be done, through petitions etc., to have people act on these easy cures?” I can only tell you what I do in response to my own cancer, multiple myeloma.

    Though I have been cancer-free since ’99 I live with the idea that my cancer may relapse someday. I pursue many lifestyle therapies and I suggest that your mom pursues these anti cancer lifestyle as well. Your mom’s risk of relapse after her chemotherapy ends will continue to be significant for years to come.

    The anti-cancer lifestyle therapies that I do and recommend are 1) daily, moderate exercise (brisk walk around the block each day kind of thing…), 2) anti-cancer nutrition (no smoking, no alcohol, little processed sugar, etc.), 3) antioxidant nutritional supplementation with curcumin, resveritrol, green tea extract, omega 3 fatty acids (all can be purchases on Amazon.com), some sort of mind-body therapy such as yoga, mediation, sleep (melatonin), spirituality, etc.

    All the therapies that I talk about above are evidence-based with studies to support their anti-cancer action.

    Yes, I wish there was more research on non-conventional therapies like DCA. Until there is your mom and I will have to do our own research and pursue our own therapies.

    Let me know if you have any questions. Good luck and hang in there.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Gaetano Lo Faso says 5 years ago

Hi thank you for your work and guide to lost souls like me. Tomorrow it will be 5 years I had surgery for the removal of my stomach ..entire stomach. It has been a journey as the side effects, constant pain , loss of 65 lbs as I was not that over weight to begin with 165 lbs. , loss of appetite and many others making it difficult to work thus loss of clients.

In any event I had an endoscopy done about 6 months ago and based on those results my oncologist has advised I am cancer free. I am not convinced though I would like t be. When should I have my next endoscopy, or scan or whatever objectively determines that the cancer is gone. How do I know I d not hhave cancer of the stomach and or any kind of cancer in the event that it may have spread on attacked differ organs or part of the body.

I would like to be worrisome free , if possible and thus what should I do to firmly say : I AM CANCER FREE.

Thanks in advance for your time and interest. Gaetano

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Gaetano-

    I am sorry to learn of your cancer issues but I disagree with your appraisal of yourself as “…lost souls like me.” You have managed to weather five years with a difficult “new normal.” In my book this fact puts you above most healthy people.

    In answer to your questions above, I will innumerate and address each below-

    1) “When should I have my next endoscopy, or scan or whatever objectively determines that the cancer is gone” The frequency of your testing is up to your oncologist. He/she has the full knowledge of your cancer- diagnosis, treatment, etc.

    2) “How do I know I d not hhave cancer of the stomach and or any kind of cancer in the event that it may have spread on attacked differ organs or part of the body.” I do not know of any cancer that is guaranteed not to relapse. My own cancer, multiple myeloma, always relapses and is considered to be incurable by conventional oncology.

    I live my life as if my cancer may relapse someday though I have been cancer-free since 1999. Please understand me. I do consider myself to be CANCER-FREE. However I think you and I must live an anti-cancer lifestyle.

    There are many studies that cite the fact that moderate, frequent exercise (walking, swimming, etc.) reduces the risk of relapse. Your weight loss, while difficult, also greatly reduces the risk of relapse. Antioxidant supplementation with curcumin, omega 3 fatty acids, green tea extract, and resveritrol all lower the risks of many cancers. These nutritional supplements probably lower your own risk of relapse too.

    I do all the lifestyle therapies above and I encourage you to do the same to lower your own risk of relapse. Lastly, in your case, I would add nutritional support. I have no study to point to for cancer survivors who have had their stomach removed but I have to believe that your body’s ability to get nutritional support from the food you eat has been seriously impaired. As such you may be nutritionally deficient. I suggest WHOLE FOOD supplementation. Not synthetic vitamin supplementation.

    I recommend Standard Process Supplements.

    Please let me know if you have any questions. Hang in there.

    David Emerson

    Reply
George Henry says 5 years ago

Needle biopsy of left kidney produced only a few ‘cells’. Ultrasound and CT scans used. Needle may have gone in a little ‘off’. Surgeon advises ‘keeping an eye’ on it. By ultrasound in 3 months. Small tumour. Your thoughts, please, would be so appreciated.

Reply
Ndia says 5 years ago

Hello Dr. My great grandmother is 87 years old and this year recently, 2015 she has been diagnosed with abdomen cancer. The cells are in all her organs, liver, cervix, kidney, etc and it’s spreading. The doctor says at her age she would be uneligible for surgery/ treatment. What is your opinion on this matter? I really want my great grandmother to live as long as possible and help please.

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Ndia-

    I am sorry to learn of your great grandmother’s (G.G.) cancer diagnosis. When you say “The cells are in all her organs, liver, cervix, kidney, etc and it’s spreading.” I take you to mean that your great grandmother has evidence of cancer, perhaps tumors or lesions, “all in her organs. I am saying this only to confirm that your great grandmother’s cancer has spread significantly. This evidence of metastasis indicates that her cancer is advanced.

    When her onc. tells you that your G.G. is ineligible for surgery or other treatment he/she is saying that conventional cancer therapies will be too hard on your G.G. physically but the onc. is also saying that any conventional cancer treatment will do nothing to increase your G.G. length of life and will certainly decrease her quality of life.

    Certainly I don’t know your G.G. Therefore it is impossible for me to give you any sort of prognosis. I based my thinking above only on what you have told me in your email. Yes, there are non-conventional therapies for you and your G.G. to consider. What I am saying, and what your onc. is saying is that advanced, metastatic cancer is extremely unlikely to be stopped, slowed or managed in any positive way.

    Please believe me, if there where any therapies that I knew of that offered any reasonable hope of success I would be the first to offer them.

    This is not my opinion but rather my experience based on many example of advanced cancers.

    Please let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Jeff P says 5 years ago

I had a kidney removed in Feb of this yr due to papillary cell renal cell carcinoma. I was just diagnosed with metastatic rcc on my lungs. The nodules are too small to biopsy right now but it appears to be slow growing. My onc thinks treatment won’t begin for 12-18 months. I am pretty much in shock as my onc indicated a max 10 yr prognosis once he starts treatment. I’m 63 yrs old now and I feel like time is closing in on me. I have no idea how to deal with this dx. Can you give me some suggestions?

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Jeff-

    I am sorry to learn of your RCC diagnosis. I understand the shock of a cancer diagnosis or of a metastatic cancer diagnosis, however you have a number of factors in your favor. Read the info below with the understanding that in my own cancer case chemo/radiation/surgery did little for me. It was the pursuit of non-toxic therapies coupled with lifestyle therapies that put me into complete remission where I remain today. Being told that a cancer is incurable (as my cancer is, multiple myeloma) is depressing to be sure. But keep in mind that this statement only means that the onc. sitting across from you doesn’t know how to treat your cancer for the long term.

    Take a deep breath and begin learning about those therapies that are available to you.

    First and foremost “small, slow growing” nodules is a positive. You can use the 12-18 months to learn about and pursue non-toxic therapies. As the studies linked below indicate, there are numerous antioxidant supplements that show evidence-based RCC killing ability. Further, all of the antioxidants discussed below are low-cost and can be purchased through Amazon. I buy all my supplement online…

    I take all below though at a lower maintenance dose as I have been taking them for years now.

    “Renal cell carcinoma”

    “…Lifestyle[edit]
    The greatest risk factors for RCC are lifestyle-related; smoking, obesity and hypertension (high blood pressure) have been estimated to account for up to 50% of cases.[13] Occupational exposure to some chemicals such as asbestos, cadmium, lead, chlorinated solvents, petrochemicals and PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) has been examined by multiple studies with inconclusive results.[14][15][16] Another suspected risk factor is the long term use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).[17]”

    Please consider quitting smoking if you do. Consider frequent, moderate exercise which over time may help you lose weight and lower your blood pressure. I don’t know what your job is but if you coming in contact with the chemicals listed above figure out how to avoid them.

    My general point is that exercise, lifestyle, environment, etc. may slow or even reverse your RCC. I’m big on plan B thinking. If you do need chemo someday, you will be “pre-habilitated.” Meaning, you will be in better physical condition and therefore will handle chemo better.

    Molecular mechanisms of curcumin-induced cytotoxicity: induction of apoptosis through generation of reactive oxygen species, down-regulation of Bcl-XL and IAP, the release of cytochrome c and inhibition of Akt.
    Influence of curcumin on HOTAIR-mediated migration of human renal cell carcinoma cells.
    Modification of Antitumor Immunity and Tumor Microenvironment by Resveratrol in Mouse Renal Tumor Model

    Milk Thistle
    Omega 3 fatty acids and RCC-

    Quercetin

    Vitamin D3

    Green Tea Extract-

    Please let me know if you have any questions about any of the information above.

    David Emerson

    Reply
      Jeff P. says 5 years ago

      David,
      Thanks so much for the information. I have never smoked, can’t take nsaids because of an allergy and am now retired. I will be getting the supplements you recommend and begin my own journey to beat this disease. I will be a regular reader of your site.

      Reply
        David Emerson says 5 years ago

        Hi Jeff-

        All good. Please read all the studies that I linked. I try not to simply tell people what I do and what I think they should do. I think it is important for cancer patients and survivors to understand what they are doing and why they may or may not follow a given therapy.

        Good luck and please keep in touch.

        thanks

        David

        Reply
          Jeff P. says 5 years ago

          How do I know what dosage of these supplements are right for me? It appears there are a myriad of choices. Should I just pick one at random or choose the largest dose? How do you decide?

          Reply
cs says 5 years ago

David thank you for all the good advice you give to help others think about dealing with their cancer another way. My friend was diagnosed with breast cancer a little over 2 years ago. She underwent chemo and had a mastectomy of one of her breast. Back in January she developed a bad cough and her doctor ran test and did a chest X-Ray to rule out lung cancer. It came back negative. However six months later she still had the cough. She finally changed doctors and the new doctor discovered she had neck cancer. She started back with chemo and was responding very good. Just a couple of days ago she started complaining of headaches and was not able to get up. Her family took her to the hospital. After running test she was diagnosed with brain cancer. It is all over in her brain, everywhere. Do you have any suggestions as to some other alternatives she can do. The doctors have told her and the family that radiation therapy will buy her about 2 months fo live. Please help.

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi CS-
    I am sorry for your friend’s cancer difficulties. Based on your email I have to make a few assumptions. I am assuming that your friend’s breast cancer (BC) was treated but has metastasized. I am assuming that your friend’s original doctor missed the early spread of breast cancer to her lungs. A second opinion found your friend’s BC had metastasized to esophageal cancer. Treatment for metastatic BC was going well but she found out a few days ago that the BC has spread to her brain.

    Your question to me is if there are any therapies available to your friend?

    I agree that radiation to your friend’s brain will buy little if any length of life while causing extensive collateral damage severely limiting her quality of life. Surgery is out as a therapy as well.

    At this point I can only confirm what you already know. And that is your friend’s situation is very serious. While you and her family’s instinct is to push more therapy on your friend, such as chemo and radiation, the reality is that toxic therapy will only limit quality of life while minimizing quantity of life.

    It is important for me to tell you that I have no personal experience with those systemic or whole body therapies that I can discuss with you. I do a great deal of research on the Internet and have read about several non-conventional therapies that may or may not help your friend.

    You may want to learn about and consider pain management in the form of both opioids as well as medical marijuana- both cannabidiol and THC. My understanding is that MM helps manage pain as well as has anti-cancer properties. Since I don’t know where your friend lives I cannot speak to where or how you might source the MM.

    Also, please learn about and consider a systemic or whole body therapy called PolyMVA.

    Please read up on and consider Ketogenic Diet and Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy as Cancer therapy-

    Please read up on and consider Avemar cancer therapy

    Please read up on and consider Intravenous Vitamin C therapy-

    CS- the above non-conventional therapies are relatively simple, depending on where you live, and should be relatively cost-effetive. Again, much depends on where you live.

    Please let me know if you have any questions.

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Bren says 5 years ago

Hi, David. I’m wondering if you have any suggestions for me. I was diagnosed with malignant melanoma. A 7mm tumor was removed from my hairline (behind my ear and directly above my shoulder). My hairdresser noticed a bump there 10-15 years ago. I’ve had it checked over the years, but the doctors thought it was a plugged hair follicle. I had terrible pain going down my shoulder and into my bowel on my right side for all those years. I would ask if something could be pressing on a nerve, maybe even that little bump, and the doctors always said no. Finally I decided to get it removed because I was noticing it when I combed my hair. I thought I was being vain. I had a pre-op and ultrasound to check it and everything pointed to a plugged hair follicle or cyst. The results came back malignant melanoma. Interestingly I had no pain in my shoulder or bowel after it was removed. I needed a larger surgery and skin graft because the margin was positive, but no ulceration. That neck surgeon said that the tumor had indeed been pressing on a nerve. My oncologist suggested interferon (only a 5% or less chance to boost immunity) and possible radiation. The CT scan did not show any masses, as they expected, and it did not get into the lymph system. I live in western Canada. I do not want to do the interferon as my surgeon told me I would be offered but it would make me very sick and would not extent my life. I think my husband understands my decision. I just think there are other options. Any suggestions would be helpful!

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Bren-
    I am sorry to learn of your malignant melanoma diagnosis. I have limited experience with the Canadian medical system so my suggestion may or may not be available to you. I hope that’s okay with you. Further, I am not a medical doctor. I am a long term cancer survivor who has been studying cancer since 1999.

    You should read about and possibly undergo several new immunotherapies- Opdivo, Keytruda,Yervoy Your response will depend on the genetic or molecular make-up of your melanoma. I will link info below. All these therapies are new and not well understood by oncology.

    Further, I understand that Cannabis oil or CBD oil is legal in Canada. This therapy is not well researched here in the states. I am only offering CBD oil as your therapies are limited and you may want to learn more about this option.

    FDA Approves Nivolumab (Opdivo) for Advanced Melanoma
    As for non-conventional therapies,
    Cannabis Oil for melanoma

    There benefit of antioxidant supplementation for melanoma is controversial. Therefore I cannot recommend anything here.

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    thanks

    David Emerson

    Reply
Karen says 5 years ago

In August 2015, my 64 year old husband was diagnosed with Stage 4 Melanoma metastized to the stomach. He had malignant chroidal melanoma (ocular) cancer in 2001, which resulted in the removal of his left eye. They followed him for 5 year to check to see that there was no leakage of any cancer from the optic nerve. When none was ever found, the oncologist released him and life has been good. So when it reappeared in August, we were stunned. They gave him 10 weeks of Opdivo/Nivolumab and when they did a follow-up cat scan, they said the medicine did not work at all, he had more tumors and now some fluid in the lungs. Again stunned as they said this was a miracle drug, though they were careful not to promise anything. They did assure us that it was not genetic, and just a freak of nature. It may as well have been water. Plan B, and the last option, is to try Mekinist/Trammetinib, but so far the insurance company has denied it, so we are now in the appeal process. We were able to do some research and get some of the CBD oil and he has been using it for 2 days now. Any thoughts, suggestions you can provide would be appreciated.

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Karen-

    I am sorry to read of your husband’s cancer diagnosis. In response to your question “We were able to do some research and get some of the CBD oil and he has been using it for 2 days now. Any thoughts, suggestions you can provide would be appreciated” there are several difficult issues regarding medical marijuana, cannibis, canabidiol, CBD, etc.

    As you know MM is still illegal on the federal level in the US. Therefore, there is little if any cancer research being conducted. In cases where there is little if any evidence-based research cancer patients and survivors often look to anecdotal evidence. I have linked an entire page of Internet results that you may learn from.

    I wish that I could provide more info for you. Please note that there are antioxidant supplements that studies have shown work to enhance conventional chemo will moderating side effects. If your husband is planning to undergo a specific chemo or combination of chemotherapies, please let me know and I will research possible integrative therapies for you.

    Melanoma CBD oil therapy

    Do you have any questions?

    David Emerson

    Reply
mindy paquin says 5 years ago

Hi again Dave and thank you for your prompt reply! Much appreciated! I guess Bill should not have asked his doctor how long do I have? Who REALLY knows,right? How much should he take of all or any of the supplements or enzymes you mention here? I have been using Healthforce antioxident extreme for the last few months. Is it advisable for Bill to take that also? He did for awhile, then I got nervous about it and made him stop. I will buy the NOW stuff right away, but need to know how much he should take. Do you personally feel he is at the end of the line? His doctor said his lung is currently 90% healthy. I guess if that changes a lot he can always live with one lung. Thank again,
Mindy

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Mindy-

    You are correct. Asking “how long do I have doc?” doesn’t do anyone any good.

    Without knowing Bill I can’t really talk about supplement doses. I suggest you work with a Naturopath or dietician in your area. After going through my own “terminal” experience I never think anyone is at the end of the line. But turning things around will require effort on your and Bill’s part.

    Good luck

    David Emerson

    Reply
      mindy paquin says 5 years ago

      Thank you so much! I have now subscribed to your newsletter.

      Mindy

      Reply
mindy paquin says 5 years ago

Hello David- I am a 64 year old wife of a 57 year old husband Bill who has been battling GIST cancer since 2004. He had surgery at Fox Chase in Philadelphia in early 2005 to remove a very large tumor near his stomach and lost 20% of his stomach and the frontal lobe of his liver. He went on Gleevec and it worked wonderfully (with one or two small but manageable recurrences) until late last year when his doctor found another tumor growing in his pelvis (very rare place for a rare cancer like GIST to occur) and they felt Gleevec was no longer working. They tried radiation which worked for about one month and then he went on Sutent. He was on Sutent till early July when they decided it was not working and they gave him Stivarga. This drug nearly killed him, with very high fevers and a leper-like rash all over his body. Around this time it was also found that there was a 1 cm GIST tumor in his right lung. This is a lot more serious than the pelvis,although his ability to walk is now being compromised by pain from the pelvic tumor. He spent several weeks of the summer in the hospital between his lung biopsy and his adverse reaction to Stivarga. They decided he could go on a clinical trial but until then, put him back on Sutent and added Rapumune to it. As of today, the tumors have both grown and these 2 drugs will be discontinued. We are now going to start Pazopanib (although Dr Von Mehrens does not expect much from it). He cannot start the clinical trial till January. Dr. Von Mehrens feels his life expectancy is definitely NOT 10 years and possibly not even 5. I am of course, totally devastated by this news. I do not know what to do–should we contact MD Anderson, or should we go to a Mexican clinic? Thanks for any advice. He is just too young!
Sincerely,
Mindy Paquin

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Mindy-

    I am sorry to read of your husband’s cancer diagnosis. Though I have to say that Bill has done well to manage a serious cancer for more than 10 years. Yes, you two have been through the ringer. But depending on Bill’s stage at diagnosis, he appears to be beating the averages.

    As for your next therapy steps, based on your email it appears that conventional chemotherapy and radiation have run their course. I don’t believe that MD Anderson or any other conventional cancer center will be able to offer curative therapies.

    Therefore you may want to consider integrative therapies. By integrative I am referring to those nutritional supplements and lifestyle therapies that may enhance your next chemo, Pazopanib, while trying to reduce the side effects. Pazopanib inhibits angiogenesis. This means it tries to stop the growth of blood vessels to the tumors.

    There are several antioxidant supplements that act similarly and can act integratively with Pazopanib. These nutritional supplements include curcumin, resveritrol, green tea extract and others. I have linked a blog post about systemic enzymes (Wobenzyme N and n-acetyl carnatine) as well for you to read and consider.

    At this point in Bill’s therapies I believe that pursuing nonconventional therapies may provide possibilities.

    Pazopanib

    Gastrointestinal Cancer- Think Non-Conventionally

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    Hang in there

    David Emerson

    Reply
Owen says 5 years ago

Dear David:I am a 71 year old male. I have a defibrillator and sever COPD. I have just undergone three surgeries for throat cancer. They removed 42 lymph glands. Finding three with tumors. One 6 cm the other two in the 1.5 cm range. They removed my tonsils took a number of biopsies from my tongue and throat. Did not find any thing else. The pet scan does not show any more tumors. A fourth surgery had to be done to repair bleeding from the previous surgery.I have difficulty talking can not eat. Feeding myself through a feeding tube. All within 50 days. I am not recovering very well at this time. My question is what are the advantages and /or the disadvantages in my taking Chemo and Radiation? I have and am still a very sick man.This is not quality life. They assure me my speech will most probably get worse and not likely to improve afterwards. It will take somewhere from 5 to 6 months to get through it and a lot more pain than what I have already gone through. IS there any real numbers that show reason why someone would want to put themselves through it?

Thank you.

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Owen-

    I am sorry to read of your health challenges. I have to say that though you call yourself “a very sick man” I have to add that you are both a very sick man and an incredibly TOUGH man. I am not an oncologist I am a cancer survivor like you do take what I say accordingly.

    To answer to your question “My question is what are the advantages and /or the disadvantages in my taking Chemo and Radiation?,” while there may be long-term benefits (maybe) to chemo and radiation, there are many more short term disadvantages.

    The tone of your email indicates that you already understand the basic equation.

    From a cancer standpoint, by surgically removing your cancer you have already “debulked” your cancer. You have greatly reduced the amount of cancer in your body. Chemo and radiation may kill a few more cancer cells but at the same time chemo and radiation will surely cause a great deal of collateral damage.

    I encourage you to take the steps necessary to heal yourself. Moderate exercise (walking daily), nutrition (when you can eat solid foods) etc. all will make you feel better, live better. Healing is good, more pain is bad.

    Finally, “is there any real numbers that show…?” I knew an accountant once that said that she could make the numbers look ANY WAY she wanted them to look. Yes, there may be numbers out there that recommend chemo and radiation. However I can make a convincing argument for NOT doing any chemo or radiation and working on healing yourself. This will result in quality and length of your life.

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Ovila Doiron says 5 years ago

Hi David,
I was diagnosed with multiple myeloma going on 5 years ago. My body is quite healthy with all I have been through up to now. | am now on Revlimid and the side effects are horrible. I try to tell this to my mm specialist but he tells me the side effects are caused by stress. I really don’t agree with him however, he wants me to go on medication for anxiety or depression or…. I just feel stuck with the whole situation. I was under the impression there was no cure for mm. I just looked up Dr B website to help a friend and saw he was treating mm.
I know he has had success treating your mm. does he have success with a lot of people who have mm? I am desperate to find a solution but am not having much success with the medication I am told I have to take.

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Ovila-

    I am sorry to read of your MM diagnosis and therapy-related side effects. Yes, living with cancer does cause stress but I agree with you that chemotherapy, including Revlimid, causes very real collateral damage aka side effects.

    Before I talk about antineoplaston therapy (ANP) through the the Burzynski Research Institute (BRI), I would like to mention those anti-oxidant supplements that research has shown to ENHANCE the efficacy of revlimid and velcade while REDUCING the toxicity.

    By supplementing with omega 3 fatty acids, curcumin, resveritrol, green tea extract and vitamin D3 studies show that your chemo will work better while you feel better. And you may choose to reduce your daily or weekly dose of chemo.

    Let me know if you would like to see the studies and or would like brand info and dosing information. I can tell you what I take…

    Regarding ANP, yes, I was terminal in ’97 began ANP in 11/97 and over the next 17 months became MM free where I remain to this day. There are many issues that you should understand before going to the BRI to begin ANP. If you would like to learn more we should talk on the phone. Too many issues to try to email, too much Q and A.

    The main issues are that your health insurance probably will not pay for ANP and the fact that there are only three MMers who have written about their experiences on the Burzynski Patient website, me being one. Though there are several other blood cancer testimonials.

    We should talk is my point. Let me know if you would like more info.

    thanks

    David Emerson

    Reply
Dianne says 5 years ago

I turned 61 right after being diagnosed, good health, so they said at the center. I have been diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma. The lump in left breast is quite large (size of med. egg). I’ve had 2 drained of fluid in previous years that were fibrocystic breast disease. They do not show on mammo or ultrasound. Biopsy came back positive. MRI showed clear in lymph nodes and right side. It is slow growing, estrogen fed, I’m taking Letrozole to shrink tumor, oncologist is leaning toward mastectomy anyway after it shrinks. And I am candidate for double mastectomy with or without reconstruction due to density. I do not want to take chemo due to poisoning that I keep reading and hearing about. Also, I’ve gone to a leading cancer center yet friends and family encourage me for 2nd opinion. Are you familiar with the documentaries showing last week and this on “Truth about Cancer” which is alternatives to Chemotherapy in most cases ie: diet, hbot therapy, red light sauna, micronutrients, etc. Thank you for your opinion.

Reply
    David Emerson says 5 years ago

    Hi Dianne-
    I am sorry to read of your invasive ductal carcinoma diagnosis though there are several positives in your email.

    1) “MRI showed clear in lymph nodes and right side.”
    2) “It is slow growing, estrogen fed, I’m taking Letrozole to shrink tumor,”
    3) and you are in good health.

    When you say “They do not show on mammo or ultrasound.” I will assume you are referring to your breast cancer.

    Regarding your questions:

    1) A second opinion is always a good idea. Most health insurance plans cover the cost. You may simply confirm what the first oncologist said or you may learn of options or alternatives that you didn’t know about before.

    2) “Are you familiar with the documentaries showing last week and this on “Truth about Cancer”” Yes. I am a long term cancer survivor myself who pursues diet/nutrition, sauna (had one this a.m.), I supplement and moderately exercise 6 mornings weekly. I do not consider these therapies to be replacements for surgery, chemo and radiation but complimentary or therapies to go along with conventional therapies.

    Yes, chemotherapy and radiation are toxic and may cause collateral damage aka side effects. The decision you must make is about the RISK of breast cancer relapse. When you undergo a certain therapy, what are the chances that the cancer will return?

    Several things for you to consider_

    1) single or double mastectomy or surgical removal of your cancer greatly reduces the risk of cancer relapse.

    2) according to your diagnosis your cancer has NOT spread. “Clear lymph nodes.”

    3) please consider the oncotype DX test for invasive estrogen positive (you) BC- The test results will give you more information about the risk of relapse.

    http://breast-cancer.oncotypedx.com/en-US/Patient-Invasive/GettingTested/AmIEligibleForTheTest.aspx

    Feel free to email me with questions and please contact me again after you have the oncotype DX test and you want to talk over your next
    steps.

    Hang in there, good luck and let me know.

    thanks

    David Emerson
    Survivor, Director, PeopleBeatingCancer

    Reply
kim says 6 years ago

There are so many different natural ways to help to destroy or prevent cancer it can be over whelming.How do we know which ones are scams and which arent?I have been diagnosed with stage 3 colorectal cancer.I got a second opionion from the cancer center of america in newnan georgia.the doctors here in augusta wanted to give me a colostomy bag and start chemo right away.when i got second opinion from cca they said they could take care of it with chemo and 6 weeks radiation which i did.there was also a mass that light up on the pet scan that the surgically removed in feb along with one of my ovaries.both were benign.there was a spot on my lung that had showed up on the pet scan as well it was 5mm went i went back for scan in july it had shrunk to 3mm they are watching it.they have not taken a biopsy of that spot yet.I have since had a spot on my face that was cancerous and i had it scraped off 2 weeks ago.my question is which protocol would you recommend and what web sites could we go on for this info.I do take zeal apricot seeds with zinc so the body can absorb the vitamin b-17, baking soda vitaminc and greens on the go kambucca.I rub my feet with frankinsense oil and have thought about the cannibus oil. I pray every night that God would give us wisdom.could you please recommend a homopathic doctor near aiken south carolina?thank you in advance for your information.

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Kim-

    I am sorry to read of your colorectal cancer diagnosis though it sounds as if you are working to take control of your health. A second opinion, debulking other possible cancers, complementary therapies, and your spirituality are all forms of evidence-based therapies that will help you fight your cancer.

    Several things. Yes, a diagnosis of cancer is overwhelming. It is difficult to be certain about any therapy be it FDA approved or not. Much of it depends on the personal judgement of the cancer patient. In this case this is you.

    Sometimes qualified oncs. can differ on treatment options for a given cancer diagnosis. I wrote a blog recently when I read an article that talks about a situation similar to yours. Much of the treatment discussed below is up to the patient. The answer to your question “my question is which protocol would you recommend and what web sites could we go on for this info?” is my blog post below. There is two sides to the outcome for a diagnosis such as your. Some people will do anything to avoid a colostomy bag but others in the article linked below talk about how they have gotten used to one.

    http://peoplebeatingcancer.org/rectal-cancer-diagnosis-read-this-to-learn-the-challenges/

    As I mentioned above, all of the complementary therapies you mention above, b-17, vitamin c, kambucha, essential oil, etc. are all good. The evidence on these is controversial but I think complementary therapies to boost one’s immune system is important.

    I will add info about several specific anti-oxidant supplements that have proven to by cytotoxic to colorectal cancer. If you choose to undergo chemo please note those supplements that are proven to enhance the efficacy of your chemo in the post linked below.

    Colorectal cancer non-conventional therapy supplementation-

    Lastly, regarding a homeopath near you, I have no personal experience with any of the referrals below.

    http://www.handsonhealth-sc.org/golocal/golocal.php?nid=L55&regnum=0&mcity=0&county_id=2&filter=L55

    My homeopathic doctor that I highly recommend is named Dr. Douglas Falkner. douglas falkner Dr. Doug lives and works in Ashland, Oregon. I live in Cleveland, Ohio. We work through email and over the phone.

    http://thefalknerschool.com

    Kim, please read over this info and reply with any questions you may have. You are at the start of a long journey and education and information is the best way for you to make the best decisions for you.

    thanks and hang in there.

    David Emerson
    Survivor, Creator and Director PeopleBeatingCancer

    Reply
susan lauder says 6 years ago

Hi David,

Question:

What supplements do you recommend for Mets BC?

I am currently taking:
– Vitamin D
– Magnesium
– Multi-vitamin
– Fish Oil
– Tumeric

Thoughts?

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Susan-

    Did you reply to one of my emails asking me to provide supplement recommendations? If so I apologize.

    About your question for nutritional supplementation for BC that has metastasized, there majority of research that I have found is directed at reducing the” risk of breast cancer.” There is little if any research for supplementation for metastatic BC. My belief is that anti-oxidant supplementation that reduces the risk of a FIRST BC diagnosis is cytotoxic to BC. But I have no research to support my thinking. Also, there is the idea of supplementation and lifestyle to strengthen bones. In addition to nutritional supplementation I would add bisphosphonate therapy. This prescription must come from your oncologist.

    Yes, all of your current list is supported by research. Actually, the multi-vitamin is debatable but I feel strongly that a healthy immune system fights cancer. I believe in whole food vitamins not synthetic vitamins but again, this is controversial.

    1) vitamin D- the issue is what serum blood levels to reach. Most studies cite a minimum of 20 nanograms/milliliter- Other studies cite 50 ng/ml to be the best level. I have to admit that if I were metastatic I would consider 50 ng/ml to be the level I would want to reach but again, I have no research to support my thinking. I have my vitamin D blood levels tested through Life Extension Foundation’s blood testing service. I have my blood drawn locally and the results are emailed to me. I can give you more info if you want.

    FYI. I supplement with 2000 mg daily. My blood serum levels as of last fall was 32 ng/ml. vitamin d blood levels

    2) Magnesium- I supplement with mag. because a) bone density, 2) heart health, 3) nerve health and 4) brain health. I recommend this for bone density.

    3) Selenium- I have no personal experience with selenium but this research says it helps met. BC- http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23613334

    4) Omega 3 fatty acids- I just blogged about fish oil and met. BC. Very thorough article citing much research- Plus I link to the amazon entry for the fish oil that I use. PBC is an amazon affiliate- if you purchase we get 5%- I feel strange saying this but I believe in transparency.

    http://peoplebeatingcancer.org/omega-3-fatty-acids-reduces-breast-cancer-relapse/

    5) curcumin/turmeric is another supplement with thorough research. Please consider supplementing with the formula that combines both curcumin and ginger.

    http://peoplebeatingcancer.org/?s=curcumin+breast+cancer&submit=

    6) green tea extract- http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4127621/

    7) resveritrol- https://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=resveratrol+and+breast+cancer+treatment&hl=en&as_sdt=0&as_vis=1&oi=scholart&sa=X&ved=0CBsQgQMwAGoVChMIr9er142xyAIViMo-Ch3Trg3W

    If my cancer had metastasized I think I would supplement aggressively. Further I believe strongly in frequent moderate exercise. If you are able I highly recommend something daily.

    I do all but 3) but at maintenance doses. Please let me know if you have any questions.

    thanks

    David

    Reply
Maria says 6 years ago

I was clinically ( gynocology ) diagnosed with cervix cancer .

Laboratory tests , confirmed cervix and vaginal cancer ( no diagnosis ) as to which one was primary

Further tests revealed specifically CT scan and MRI …. Revealed swollen lymph nodes in two areas

One liver and one around rectum

Colonoscopy … Find one polyp . ( no lab results ) clinical look … No cancer

Present team at Princess Margaret in Toronto … Speared headed by radiologist ( wanting / intending to treat radiate lymph node as cancer , w/ diagnosis

1. Iam undergoing a Ct pet scan and my question is what other tests if any should I undertake to diagnose this nymph node issue …. And should I not and why can I note obtain a concise and clear diagnosis

Can you assist me and how …

Maria

Sent from my iPad

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Maria-

    I am sorry to read of your cervical cancer. I will address your question below but before I do I want to offer information, research, etc. with respect to possible therapies, possible side effects from those therapies and ways to minimize those side effects (aka collateral damage from chemo and or radiation).

    In other words, I have learned from my experience as a long term cancer survivor that knowledge is power- the more you know, the better decisions you will make, the better you will feel.

    Your question ” my question is what other tests if any should I undertake to diagnose this nymph node issue …. And should I not and why can I note obtain a concise and clear diagnosis?.”

    Your goal is to determine if your cancer has metastasized or spread. This is what your onc. is trying to confirm. A CT. PET scan should determine this. Good news that you do not have colon cancer.

    If you are interested in more info, let me know what your onc. says about your CT/PET scan, possible therapy, surgery, chemo, radiation possibly. Based on your feedback I can provide research for you to consider your options.

    Hang in there.

    David Emerson
    Survivor, Director PeopleBeatingCancer

    Reply
Kathy says 6 years ago

I am a 62 year old female who was diagnosised with breast cancer 15 years ago. I had a lumpectomy with chemotherapy and then radiation. about a year ago I was diagnosised with stage 4 breast cancer that has mets to bone liver and maybe lungs. I changed my diet and have been taking sacred franchinsence drinking esiac tea jasmine ands enchanted tea . I also take fresh ginger mixed with fresh turmeric and then mix them with honey. I eat it teaspoon 4 times per day. take about 5000 mg vt. C. Avoid sugar and eat primarily meats with no hormones or antibiotics . Drink a plant based protein shake every morning and add vt. D cells forte max 3 . I do see onogoligist monthly for an injection that is suppose to keep cancer in the bone from spreading and I take a daily pill to suprpress estrogen as my cancer is estrogen fed. My cancer counts have been going up the past few months. Do you have any suggestions to help me ? MD is not giving me any hope and does not know I am doing alternative therapy. I have thought about trying B17 or maybe peach extract.

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Kathy-
    My apologies for taking so long to reply. You are doing so much that is right,(by my way of thinking), that it took me a couple of days to think about offering ideas or therapies that may be useful to you. First and foremost, please try not to think about your dr. not giving you any hope. My onc. told me I was terminal back in 1997. Conventional oncology is limited in it’s thinking.

    For the sake of my input below I will state my assumptions. The injection you refer to is a bisphosphonate or bone hardening therapy. You are supplementing with vitamin C, curcumin and vitamin D3. Your diet is good. You are suppressing your estrogen production.

    I would continue all these therapies. I will list therapies below with links to the evidence-based research. I have found a number of studies that cite nutritional supplements acting synergistically with each other. By taking curcumin, resveritrol, omega 3 fatty acids together their apoptotic effect may be enhanced.

    Please consider supplementing with resveritrol. I’ve been taking resveritrol (I can email my brand dose if you would like) for more than five years now.

    Please consider supplementing with omega 3 fatty acids- Again, I can email the brand I take.

    Please consider supplementing with green tea extract-

    Please consider supplementing with milk thistle-

    The last therapy is both well studied as a breast cancer therapy yet is not really pushed by BC oncologists. I am linking a study below authored by Dr. Dean Ornish. Dr. Ornish studied prostate cancer patients but I believe that the ability to change gene expression holds for breast cancer patients as well as prostate cancer patients.

    Dr. Ornish advocates DAILY, moderate exercise. I work out six days a week but moderately. I spend 30 mins. on an elliptical every other day and I lift weights moderately. The weights are so light that you may think they are TOO light. Do multiple reputations until you get tired.

    Here is the study by Dean Ornish-

    Lastly, regarding the last sentence about B17 aka apricot seeds, while I don’t know much about this therapy other than what we all have read, I am happy to research this therapy if you ask me to.

    Let me know if you have any questions.

    Hang in there.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Bill Jenkins says 6 years ago

David I have prostate cancer and my scores were 8-9 very aggressive. My scans show that it has not spread yet. My Urologist said I must have my prostate removed because I am only 50. My friend knows Laurens Pierce who used Tomo Therapy and has been cancer free for nine years without all the side effects. If this works why would they want to remove my prostate? What do you think?

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Bill-

    I am sorry to read of your prostate cancer diagnosis. I will assume that by “scores were 8-9” you are referring to your Gleason score. The fact that your PCa has not spread aka metastasized is good. Have you been given a stage of your cancer? A stage will help you make a decision as well.

    With aggressive therapy there is always the risk of side effects. The question is whether or not a radical prostatectomy (complete prostate removal) will result in greater collateral damage than tomotherapy.

    Tomography is relatively new as a prostate therapy. Therefore you and I have limited studies on which to base our decisions. I have linked and excerpted a Pubmed study below that I think applies to your situation. I will list issues that you must deal with if you choose to proceed with tomotherapy. I have read many studies citing the collateral damage of a radical prostatectomy and you are correct in your thinking- surgical prostate removal can cause a great deal of collateral damage.

    1) It is clear from my research that the specific tomotherapy device is important in your therapy.

    2) Further, it is important to find the radiation oncologist with as much tomotherapy experience as possible.

    3) lastly, it is important to confirm with your health insurer that they will pay for tomotherapy at whatever facility you go to if you choose tomotherapy.

    Keep in mind that if your Urologist’s hospital (where he works) does not offer tomography then they won’t offer it to you as a therapy.

    I can research tomotherapy locations for you if you are interested.

    Lastly and most importantly there are several nutritional supplements such as vitamin e (broad spectrum) and resveritrol that have been shown to reduce radiation damage. Again, if you are interested I can provide studies and specific brands that have been evaluated and approved. Let me knw.

    Moderate hypofractionation and simultaneous integrated boost by helical tomotherapy in prostate cancer: monoinstitutional report of acute tolerability assessment with different toxicity scales.

    “Based on radiobiology evidence, hypofractionated radiotherapy has the potential of improving treatment outcome in prostate cancer patients. In this study, we evaluated the safety, in terms of acutetoxicity, of using moderate hypofractionated radiotherapy delivered with Helical Tomotherapy (HT) to treat prostate cancer patients…

    Acute toxicity was acceptable, independently from the system used to score side effects. Moderate genitourinary toxicity was more frequent than gastrointestinal toxicity. No correlation between acute side effects and patients’ characteristics or physical dose parameters was registered. EPIC evaluation showed a negligible difference in urinary and bowel function post-treatment, that did not reach statistical significance…

    Our experience confirms the safety of moderate hypofractionation delivered with HT in prostate cancer patients with low, intermediate and high risk.”

    Bill- my research into tomography has been interesting. Thank you.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Lawrence says 6 years ago

Hi David:

I just came across your site, and it is excellent!

David, I am an otherwise fit middle aged man, 56 years old, who was originally diagnosed with Mgus four years ago, on a routine blood test, here in Canada, that showed an abnormally high level of protein in my blood (IGM levels).

My IGM level at the time was 10 g/L, and had stayed around that level for two years.
However, in late 2013, the IGM m spike level started increasing even more, and in subsequent blood tests the last couple of years, the levels started rising to 12.30 g/L, to 15.40 g/L, to 19.10 g/L, and now at 21.70 g/L.
The IGM levels are supposed to be between 0.46-3.04 g/L!

The Oncologist now said that short of doing a biopsy, she firmly believes that I have lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma, or Waldenstroms, and no longer, unfortunately have Mgus.

I went to another Oncologist here in Canada, and she too, confirmed that I have smouldering Waldenstroms.

While all the other blood tests over the last few years of testing have always been normal, with normal readings of the white blood cells, red blood cells, platelets, etc, I also have never had any symptoms at all, and have always been asymptomatic.

I take care of myself, eat organic foods, and have always been interested in the field of alternative health (vitamins, herbs, etc).

Lately I have tried sauna treatments, coffee enemas, and experimented with vegetarian diets, paleo, raw, macrobiotic diets, until recently just having a varied diet of everything.

My concerns are that, although I am not experiencing any symptoms, I am at wits end as to why the IGM levels have steadily climbed over the last two years, and that, not one, but two Oncologists believe that I have smouldering Waldenstroms, or lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma.

David, it is very frustrating for me, and upsetting, to know, that now with this ticking time bomb of an illness, it seems that it is only a matter of time before one experiences symptoms according to these Oncologists.

Yet I feel fine, enjoy working out, however, am depressed to hear that I have the dreaded ‘C’ according to these doctors.

I have also heard from them, that if one is not experiencing symptoms, and even if a biopsy shows that I have this disease, since I have no symptoms, there is no treatment.

Interestingly enough, a friend of mine had Waldenstroms, and although recently he died unfortunately, he would always tell me that the Oncologists should only treat ones symptoms, and not a number (IGM reading) on a blood test, no matter how abnormal that reading might be.

David, although friends may say to just ‘live your life’, yet receiving news that one has Cancer, is not easy at all.

Due to my anxiety levels, and although I am not experiencing any symptoms at present, what are your views on mindfulness meditation?

David, again, I feel good, and am curious to also ask you your opinion on other supplements, other then the Vitamin D, Curcumin, Resveratrol, Co-Q10, grape seed extract, NAC, and a few others you have suggested on your website, would you recommend any other supplements with someone allegedly who has this condition?

Further, you mentioned that you do a sauna once a week, (I have also used a sauna, however used it every day) and am wondering if you think I should continue the sauna sessions, or stay away from it?

In closing, I would like to know, what I can do, if anything, to prevent the IGM levels from continuing to rise?

I mean I would like the levels to say at a stable reading, and to stay around that level, and not having to continue to rise or ascend to the present high level it today.

Any words of advice, would be appreciated,

Thanks David,

Regards,
Lawrence

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Lawrence-

    Thank you for your kind words. I am sorry to read that you are so frustrated with your health. I will excerpt your email below in an effort to provide experience and research that may help your situation.

    1) “I went to another Oncologist here in Canada, and she too, confirmed that I have smouldering Waldenstroms.” A second opinion is always a good idea. Coming out of any pre-cancer is difficult but you lead a healthy lifestyle and you appear to be open to learning about additional lifestyle therapies that may reduce your pre-cancer indicators.

    2) “David, it is very frustrating for me, and upsetting, to know, that now with this ticking time bomb of an illness, it seems that it is only a matter of time before one experiences symptoms according to these Oncologists.” Yes, being diagnosed with cancer is extremely difficult. However I look at your situation differently than you do. You appear to be willing to eat, sauna, moderately exercise, supplement, etc. which I would argue is the best series of non-conventional therapies for your situation currently. You may prevent your blood cancer from further advance to WM.

    3) “although friends may say to just ‘live your life’, yet receiving news that one has Cancer, is not easy at all.” I agree that living with a cancer diagnosis is difficult. My solution (just mine) is to focus on non-conventional therapies. This focus helps me think that I can control my cancer. I say “think” I can control because I don’t really know if I control it.

    4) “I have also heard from them, that if one is not experiencing symptoms, and even if a biopsy shows that I have this disease, since I have no symptoms, there is no treatment.” Oncologists are saying only that Conventional oncology cannot offer any therapies. Frankly, this is a good thing right now. Your non-conventional therapies can be more effective.

    5) “Due to my anxiety levels, and although I am not experiencing any symptoms at present, what are your views on mindfulness meditation?” I do not practice mindful meditation though I believe strongly in the mind-body connection in cancer care. Yes, learn this therapy and practice it.

    6) “David, again, I feel good, and am curious to also ask you your opinion on other supplements, other then the Vitamin D, Curcumin, Resveratrol, Co-Q10, grape seed extract, NAC, and a few others you have suggested on your website, would you recommend any other supplements with someone allegedly who has this condition?”

    While all those supplements are supported by research as therapies to slow or kill MM, I can’t find much research about nutriceuticals and WM. The only study for your situation is linked below-

    Resveratrol and simvastatin decrease IgM secretion in Waldenström macroglobulinemia: One-year follow-up.

    My guess is that there is little research going on since WM is relatively rare blood cancer. I cannot say with any surety if those supplements will benefit you.

    7) “Further, you mentioned that you do a sauna once a week, (I have also used a sauna, however used it every day) and am wondering if you think I should continue the sauna sessions, or stay away from it?”

    My reason for sauna is that 1) studies show that whole body hyperthermia kills cancer, 2) sauna improves endothelial function ( I have heart issues…) and 3) sauna detoxifies you (causes heavy metals to be excreted). Not to mention my sauna relaxes me.

    I think everyone should sauna. Yes, check with your doctor and drink plenty of clean water before but sauna’s are excellent therapy.

    7) “In closing, I would like to know, what I can do, if anything, to prevent the IGM levels from continuing to rise?” I think that if you continue your nutrition, exercise, mind-body therapy, read and perhaps add resveritrol and simvastin, sauna, etc. then yes, I think your IGM levels could stabilize.

    I hope I have addressed your main concerns. Let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson

    Reply
      Lawrence says 6 years ago

      Hi David:

      Thank you so much for the quick reply.

      David, a couple of more questions if that is okay.

      David, I was thinking, that if I did end up having a biopsy done in the near future, to appease perhaps these Oncologists perspectives, and maybe confirm their evaluation observations that I do indeed have smouldering WM, to a more formal diagnosis, I have also heard that having a biopsy could also stir something up, in the body, and if one is not experiencing symptoms at present, is it really necessary then to have one at all at present?

      The Oncologist did say to me to consider having an ultrasound of my spleen, since an enlarged spleen is a sign that it could be WM, however, an ultrasound of the spleen was done in the past, and it was fine.
      I will though get another ultrasound to check it again.

      David, in terms of your answers, one thing I forgot to mention to you with regards to the sauna, was that I had purchased a ‘near infrared sauna’, from ‘Sauna Space’ (www.saunaspace.com) not a far infrared sauna.

      The owner of the company is a wonderful man, and appreciated all his support on the phone when placing the order a year ago.

      It is not a far infrared sauna, rather it is a low emf near infrared sauna.
      I have used it, and enjoyed it, however, unfortunately as mentioned, since my IGM levels went up yet again on the most recent blood test result the other day, this is one of the reasons why I have been questioning everything lately to see why the IGM levels have gone up so much this past year and a half.

      One friend of mine, suggested taking very hot baths, as opposed to saunas, as a way of helping the lymphatic system, and body, (hyperthermia) fight the cancer.

      The other ‘new’ alternative therapies that I have looked into recently, were also the consumption of raw milk, from a local farmer, however, I will stop that, since I have heard that perhaps a little dairy is okay, yet every day, some studies have shown not to consume dairy at all, if one has ‘C’.

      So, the consumption of raw dairy, may or may not have also be a contributing factor as to why the IGM levels have gone up?

      Further, according to the former Dr. Kelly, and his metabolic diet protocol, they had recommended coffee enemas, which I have also tried these last few months, however, it is hard to say if they too may or may not have contributed to the ascension of my IGM levels.

      So, in your opinion, do you think I should continue the near infrared sauna treatments, and coffee enemas, and or, perhaps give them a rest for the time being, or use them from time to time, and, or don’t use them at all until the next scheduled blood test results in December, to see if the IGM levels have stabilized let alone continue to go up?

      Further, an information piece for yourself, and your readers, is that have you heard of the Buteyko method? This method of breathing was invented from a former Russian scientist. It is a very interesting discussion of looking at our breathing, and the fact that one should breathe through their nose, and not through there mouths.

      David, if you want more information about this, google, the name ‘Buteyko’ breathing on the Internet, and let me know your views on this, if you wish?

      David, it is a form of breathing, or reduced breathing by holding your breadth, as a way of improving the oxygen in your body. I tried it in the past, and had gotten away from it, due to my busy schedule, however, will now give it a shot again, and will try the breathing exercises as a way of calming down my body, and mind, as well as improving one’s oxygen levels.
      Wouldn’t it be nice if that contributes to the stabilizing of the IGM levels?!

      David, with reference to your answer about my inquiry about additional supplementation in point #6) you had mentioned with regards to the supplement question to you, that from one study with Waldenstroms, it had stated the use of the drug ‘simvastitin’, to try and bring down the IGM levels.

      Yet I am not taking any drugs, and am nervous about drugs, and have only taken alternative forms (vitamins, herbs, homeopathic remedies) and although I hugely appreciate your findings into nutrition supplements for me, and for people with WM, as opposed to MM, should I ask my Doctor about the simvastitin, or try and find the ingredients of that drug, and see if there is a reasonable equivalent of a supplement to be used, or a homeopathic remedy?

      Further, some alternative doctors in the United States, have recommend mega doses of Pancreatin supplements, for people with Cancer, yet for blood cancer, this is a difficult one to try to figure out.

      David, thank you again so much for your help, support, and assistance in this area, as I am so pleased that I came across your site, and ‘met you’ through your responses to my inquiries, however, the one thing that keeps bothering me David, is trying to figure out why my IGM levels have continued to rise (and although I am not experiencing any symptoms) am so torn inside, as to why this keeps happening to me?

      I understand the importance of being positive, and appreciate your support in my quest to looking into the alternative ways of doing things, such as supplements, breathing, sauna, perhaps coffee enemas, etc, yet am still puzzled that my levels keep rising.

      Hopefully by the next tests in December, I can hear from the Oncologist(s) that the level did not go up next time. Wouldn’t that be nice?!

      Thanks David,

      Looking forward to your response when you have a moment,

      Take care,
      Lawrence

      Reply
        David Emerson says 6 years ago

        Hi Lawrence-

        Again, I will excerpt your questions in order to address as many of your questions as possible.

        1) “David, I was thinking, that if I did end up having a biopsy done in the near future, to appease perhaps these Oncologists perspectives, and maybe confirm their evaluation observations that I do indeed have smouldering WM, to a more formal diagnosis..”

        Assuming that a diagnostic test is covered by your insurance and has no side effects I think that the more info you have to make decisions the better.

        2) “I have also heard that having a biopsy could also stir something up, in the body, and if one is not experiencing symptoms at present, is it really necessary then to have one at all at present?”

        I have read about the general concern that biopsy’s can “stir something up” but I have never found studies to verify this. I don’t know enough about your possible cancer but are there other diagnostic tests (blood or urine) to give the same info?

        3) “David, in terms of your answers, one thing I forgot to mention to you with regards to the sauna, was that I had purchased a ‘near infrared sauna’, from ‘Sauna Space’ (www.saunaspace.com) not a far infrared sauna.”

        Yes, many people are concerned about EMF’s- again, I have found no studies to confirm anything. I,myself take an old-fashioned low tech approach by using a sauna with electrical heated rocks. I cannot offer any info, either way, about near or far.

        4) “One friend of mine, suggested taking very hot baths, as opposed to saunas, as a way of helping the lymphatic system, and body, (hyperthermia) fight the cancer.”

        I think whole-body hyperthermia is an excellent therapy for people with blood cancers (systemic cancer)

        5) “So, the consumption of raw dairy, may or may not have also be a contributing factor as to why the IGM levels have gone up?”

        After reading both pluses and minuses about raw dairy (and red meat too) and cancers, my feeling is that each person metabolizes these differently and as such, may need them (dairy/red meat) or not. The book “Eat right for your blood type” makes this case.

        6) “So, in your opinion, do you think I should continue the near infrared sauna treatments, and coffee enemas, and or, perhaps give them a rest for the time being, or use them from time to time, and, or don’t use them at all until the next scheduled blood test results in December, to see if the IGM levels have stabilized let alone continue to go up?”

        I think detoxification and whole body hyperthermia are both therapies that fit a healthy lifestyle- including nutrition, frequent, moderate exercise, hydration, mind-body therapies, sleep, etc.

        7) “Further, an information piece for yourself, and your readers, is that have you heard of the Buteyko method? This method of breathing was invented from a former Russian scientist. It is a very interesting discussion of looking at our breathing, and the fact that one should breathe through their nose, and not through there mouths.”

        I don’t know of the Buteyko method however deep breathing is also a good general therapy- when I find myself getting tense in say, traffic, I breath deeply in order to relax myself. I will learn more about this therapy. I have an oxygen concentrator and give myself 100% oxygen from time to time. I consider increased oxygen to be similar to sweating and detoxifying.

        8) “…should I ask my Doctor about the simvastitin, or try and find the ingredients of that drug, and see if there is a reasonable equivalent of a supplement to be used, or a homeopathic remedy?”

        Yes, I think that talking to your doctor about simvastintin would be a good idea. Resveritrol as well though this is a nutritional supplement.

        9) ” Further, some alternative doctors in the United States, have recommend mega doses of Pancreatin supplements, for people with Cancer, yet for blood cancer, this is a difficult one to try to figure out.”

        As I mentioned earlier I am a product of what I research and read. I have read specific studies that cite a combination of enzymes that included pancreatin called Wobenzym N to reduce both multiple myeloma and blood clots (DVT). I take Wobenzym N. I don’t mega dose, I follow what directed on the label. Yes I think Wobenzym N is an excellent therapy for blood cancers.
        Wobenzyme N

        10) “David, thank you again so much for your help, support, and assistance in this area, as I am so pleased that I came across your site, and ‘met you’ through your responses to my inquiries, however, the one thing that keeps bothering me David, is trying to figure out why my IGM levels have continued to rise (and although I am not experiencing any symptoms) am so torn inside, as to why this keeps happening to me?”

        I can see how and why you would be torn inside, as you say. I can only offer my own thinking. I have an incurable cancer and I study to learn as much as I can about non-conventional therapies to manage my cancer.

        Please keep me posted about your testing, any symptoms, etc. keep in touch. Thanks

        David Emerson

        Reply
Esther Squires says 6 years ago

Hello, I am Esther Squires. My father has been diagnosed with prostate cancer matastasized to liver.
Here is a brief synopsis of what he has undergone to date. His cancer is the typical adenocarcinoma with very aggressive NEPC. He has taken radiation mostly to help with colon discomfort due to enlargement of prostate. He has undergone 3 rounds of Chemo. They have stopped his chemo because after his CT scan it has shown that it was not effective. He has 1 tumor that was at 10 cm but shrunk to 9.7. He has 2 others that were 1 cm but grew to 3 cm. during the chemo treatments. Those must be the aggressive cancer tumors. He had been on CBD oil and THC but found the high just too much for him. He eats well. There is nothing left for them to do. I would love to find some clinical trials that might fit his diagnosis. Any help would be incredibly appreciated.He is 77 years old. We live in Newfoundland, Cananda.

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Esther-

    I am sorry to learn of your dad’s prostate cancer situation. I will try to offer therapies but I don’t understand the Canadian medical system and therefore I don’t know what is available, paid for, etc.

    Regarding radiation and your dad’s colon discomfort and radiation. If you can find a clinic or hospital that offer hyperbaric oxygen therapy please read the study linked below and consider HBOT to help your dad with his pain. Please scroll down the page to read about HBOT and radiation.

    Secondly, regarding your dad’s cancer metastasizing. Please consider bisphosphonate therapy BEFORE your dad’s cancer metastasizes to his bones. The study linked talks about breast cancer but your dad may find himself in the same situation soon.

    Bisphosphonates for PCa-

    As for therapy to slow your dad’s PCa cancer, if your doctor’s say that both chemo and radiation are not working and if they have not offered other therapies such as a prostatectomy (complete prostate removal) then I am not sure what I can offer.

    RE clinical trials, are you saying that you want to enter into clinical trials in the U.S.? I am happy to research possible clinical trials if you are interested though I don’t know anything about Canadian clinical trials.

    I will I could offer more assistance. Let me know if you have any questions.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Gabrielle says 6 years ago

Hello David: I was diagnosed with breast cancer in May of this year(2015). I underwent a lumpectomy on May 26th. My first visit with the oncologist was on July 29th. At that point in time he recommended chemo…radiation and hormone therapy. Prior to this visit I had been told that the surgery was successful and that I only had to take radiation…every day for 5 weeks and hormone therapy for 5 to 10 years. I refused the chemo at which point the oncologist said he would send the pathology away to determine risk factors of my cancer returning. I have my results and the risk is low..(20) I am as healthy 61 year old woman and I do not want to do any of the other treatments because I think I will be OK. I have never taken very many drugs, only a ton of vitamins!!! My question is, after all that info…Where do I begin to find the information that I would need to battle my cancer naturally?
Thank-you
Gabrielle

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Gabrielle-

    I am sorry to read of your breast cancer diagnosis though I am happy that you are reaching out to me to confirm your thinking. I have been working with a husband and wife team recently who have been working through what I believe is a very similar situation.

    I will list my assumptions below-

    1) “hormone therapy” aromatase inhibitors or tamoxifen-
    2) “determining the risk factors of my cancer returning” is the Oncotype DX breast cancer test. A result of 20 indicates that the risk of relapse is low.

    To answer your question “Where do I begin to find the information that I would need to battle my cancer naturally?” I will link a blog post I wrote awhile back that lists 14 different natural therapies each to reduce the risk of BC relapse. I’m sure that you know of many such as vitamin D3 or curcumin supplementation. Regular, moderate exercise is probably the most effective therapy to reduce the risk of BC relapse though conventional oncology rarely promotes it.

    My point is that the therapies listed in the link below work. And you are choosing wisely to pursue the steps listed in your post to me in addition to the steps listed in the link below.

    Slash Your Breast Cancer Risk of Relapse Now!

    I can recommend specific brands and doses if you are interested- I can relay what I brand/dose of vitamin D3 and curcumin, etc. I take.

    I hope I have answered your question. Let me know if you have any other questions.

    thanks

    David Emerson

    Reply
      Gabrielle says 6 years ago

      Hi David: I am not adverse to the radiation….probably because I don’t know a whole lot about the process. If you have any further information please share. The thing that I absolutely do not want to do is take that drug(forgot the name but it is an estrogen blocker)for 5 to 10 years. I can visualize myself coming apart within this western medical system. I know the doctors mean well but I am listening to my body screaming NO DO NOT DO IT!! Again I am rather chatty so the question is How hurtful to my system is the Radiation? Thanks David

      Reply
        David Emerson says 6 years ago

        Hi Gabrielle-
        Arimidex/Tamoxifen (estrogen blockers) and local radiation to your breast all have toxicities and therefore cause collateral damage. The key to your decision is that your Oncotype DX BC score means that you have less chance of relapse. I cannot say with any specificity “how hurtful to my system is the radiation” because everyone reacts differently.

        If you are interested I can recommend nutritional supplementation that studies have shown reduce collateral damage and melatonin skin cream that again, research has shown reduces damage to your skin. I’m not sure my own radiation burns are fully healed after 17 years…

        If you choose to reduce estrogen naturally please talk to a naturopathic doctor.

        arimidex side effects

        tamoxifen side effects

        Natural estrogen blocker-

        Let me know if you are interested in any of the info above or have any questions.

        Hang in there

        David Emerson

        Reply
          Gabrielle says 6 years ago

          Good morning David; Please send me a list of the supplements that you recommend for my treatment and also more info on how to care for my skin before, during or after my radiation treatments.
          Hanging in there but wobbly;
          Gabrielle

          Reply
          David Emerson says 6 years ago

          Hi Gabrielle–

          In addition to talking about supplements that may protect you from toxicity I want to send you excerpts/links from studies about supplements and radiation so that you can think through what supplements you take. I am not a dr. and I am not comfortable telling cancer patients what to do.

          These supplements are linked to the brands that I take but you can buy anything you prefer at Amazon or your local health food store.

          Let me know if you have any questions. You are shaky but you will do better (statistically) by learning, taking control of your health, taking charge…

          David

          1) Melatonin skin cream-
          2) vitamin E- full spectrum of tocotrenols, tocopherols-
          3) Resveritrol-
          4) Curcumin-

          Resveratrol reduces radiation-induced chromosome aberration frequencies in mouse bone marrow cells.

          Radioprotection and radiosensitization by curcumin.

          The excerpt below is from a book by Ralph Moss. I recommend buying his ebook on breast cancer.

          “Protection From Radiation Damage
          Are there specific foodstuffs or nutrients that can protect against the harmful effects of
          chemotherapy and radiation? There is growing evidence that this is so, as you can see
          from the following examples of research on specific antioxidants.
          Vitamin E studies
          • A 2012 study of 132,000+ individuals in China showed that a high level of
          consumption of vitamin E either from diet or vitamin supplements lowered the
          risk of liver cancer. It was published in the Journal of the National Cancer
          Institute. The study was conducted by investigators from the Shanghai Cancer
          Institute, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and the National Cancer Institute.
          “We found a clear, inverse dose-response relation between vitamin E intake and
          liver cancer risk,” the authors wrote.
          • A 2010 study showed that vitamin E-like tocotrienols “inhibited the growth” of
          breast cancer cells by their effect on the body’s cytokines. “Hence, we report that
          tocotrienols have potent antiangiogenic and antitumor effects….”
          (Selvaduray KR, Radhakrishnan AK, Kutty MK, Nesaretnam K. Palm tocotrienols inhibit proliferation of
          murine mammary cancer cells and induce expression of interleukin-24 mRNA. J. Interferon Cytokine Res.
          2010;30:909-916)
          • A 2009 study from England demonstrated a way of delivering a vitamin E-like
          compound (tocotrienol) that seems to have profound anticancer activity in animals…”

          Reply
Frank Marziani says 6 years ago

I am looking for opinions on proton therapy for prostate cancer. I am in the very early stages of the disease and was thinking about surgery. I have been told that if you start with radiation therapy and the cancer comes back, you can not have surgery. Is there enough data on proton therapy to raise its “cure” levels above traditional radiation?

Reply
Joy Baker says 6 years ago

My husband has lymphoma. Was diagnosed in 2012, had 6 chemo treatments, was supposedly cancer free, but has now been diagnosed with it in the soft tissue in lung, etc. What herbs or vitamins can he take? This second round of chemo is really rough on him. The first time he did fine, but not this time. Please help, any suggestions appreciated. I have also seen and heard that apricot seeds can cure cancer. Do you have any knowledge, thoughts or evidence on this? Thank you, and God bless you.

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Joy-
    I am sorry to read of your husband’s relapse of lymphoma. The key for his treatment will be to learn about and consider “integrative” therapy. Taking and integrative approach to your husband’s therapy means to pair antioxidant supplementation with whatever chemotherapy he is taking.
    An example would be curcumin and resveritrol supplementation with velcade or revlimid. I don’t know if this is one of your husband’s chemo, I’m simply giving an example. I would find and email you specific supplements supported by specific studies.

    What chemotherapy is your husband taking or will take?

    thanks and hang in there

    David Emerson

    Reply
Could a Second Opinion Change Your Breast Cancer Prognosis? - PeopleBeatingCancer says 6 years ago

[…] You owe it to yourself to get a second opinion. […]

Reply
jonathan mico diaz says 6 years ago

Hi david, i am veteran my name is Jonathan mico diaz, and I live in san antonio tx, being 40 years old, my first language is spanish but I will do my best to tell you in shorts words what is happened to me. I was bleading while having bowel movement for several month, then I got a clonoscopy, when they found a tumor at list 40cm, after that, they sent to lab a 1.5 cm and it was possitive as a malign cancer but not stage or level have been secured yet because they are not sure. Right after that the Doctor change my nutrition and I start to juice vegetable and somebody talked to me about a product that is called transfer factor pluss, I start use this for few days before a cam scann. then my numbers came significant better, no was activity of spread cancer, but the doctor going to do a left hemicolectmy to remove the area that is damaged and reconneted the leftover to rectum. I was asking why They do not have a stage level cancer but he told me that it seems like an early stage cancer and it was necesary this surgery to see using little cuts and camera how severe can be. Since I change my nutrition my bleeding stop, today somebody was talking about flor essence and barley green, there is to much opinions so you are a survivor, and I respect what you have to tell, what can I do to prevent spreads cancer, my surgery will be on august 7 2015 but the doctor told me that if want I can delay it for about 45 days. God bless you more.

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Jonathan-

    I would like to clarify some of your email before I offer suggestions.

    When you say “it was positive as a malign cancer but not stage or level have been secured yet because they are not sure.” You are saying that
    1) you have been diagnosed with colon cancer but you don’t know what stage?

    When you say “then my numbers came significant better, no was activity of spread cancer,”
    1) you are saying that your colon cancer has not spread beyond your colon? If not, this is good for your prognosis.

    When you say “I was asking why They do not have a stage level cancer but he told me that it seems like an early stage cancer and it was necesary this surgery to see using little cuts and camera how severe can be”
    1) you are saying that you were not given a stage because your surgeon wanted to do “Laparoscopic” surgery to determine if your cancer had spread outside your colon?

    So your question is “what can I do to prevent spreads cancer?” Your laprascopic surgery is on August 7th? I will assume the above and that your colon cancer has not spread beyond you colon. Also, I will assume that since you are a veteran that you can accomplish what I suggest. What I am trying to say is that if you had the discipline to become a veteran the you will have the discipline to accomplish the below.

    1) Moderate exercise six days a week. Find some form of physical movement that you enjoy. Walking, swimming, golf, tennis, etc. but get your heart going six days a week. Start today. Go for a long walk daily to get in shape for your surgery on 8/7/15.

    2) Your diet- your doctor will give you specific instructions for you you can and can’t eat after your surgery but once you heal, build lots of fruits, veggies, and whole grains into your daily diet.

    3) Read the article that is linked below. I take each of the five supplements that help prevent a cancer recurrence and my cancer has NEVER recurred. I can suggest specific brands if you need me to.

    These three things are the most effective therapies to reduce your risk of relapse.

    5 Supplements That Help Prevent Cancer Recurrence

    Good luck and let me know if you have any questions.

    thanks

    David Emerson

    Reply
      Jonathan mico says 6 years ago

      Mr David Emerson thanks a lot for your time answering these questions. I will put on march your advise and I will feedback to you. Is there is something that I can do to support your dedication to this work that you are doing, let me know what to do, I respectfully wish to you a prosper and healthy life, God bless America and people like you! sincerely. Jonathan Mico

      Reply
        David Emerson says 6 years ago

        Hi Jonathan-

        Yes, there are two things that you can do. First, please follow my advice and remain cancer-free- and yes, please give me your feedback. Second, In May 2016 I hand-cycle in the Cleveland Marathon. I will email all the cancer coaching contacts to ask them to support me and PeopleBeatingCancer. If you feel like it, a donation will support future cancer patients.

        To see me hand cycling please click this 6 second video- IMG_0694.MOV

        Good luck and stay healthy.

        David Emerson

        Reply
Jess says 6 years ago

Aloha David,

My mother has been diagnosed as of last Monday with small cell lung cancer / extensive stage – mass rt lung, upper abdomen, lump under jaw, lump at collar bone. As of Friday MRI, it has not spread to brain. Note she is going to be 81 soon but does not look it. She is still climbing trees, looks very healthy, eats well, weighs 117 (in this case her small frame sounds like a detriment for what’s about to happen). I am not seeing any comments on this site regarding the type of cancer my mother has. I understand this is very aggressive and chemo was suggested not as a curative but palliative care. She is scheduled for her 1st chemo treatment tomorrow in attempt to stop or slow the spread for now and perhaps shrink it to buy her more time. If the 1st round is successful in achieving that, I have read how MDR cells will kick in to overdrive and other chemo treatment will have no effect.
SO educate me on boosting her immune system instead of destroying it and having better quality of her remaining life. I am seeing terms of – immunotherapy, integrative therapies, Protocel. As time is of the essence, there is not a lot of time to do thorough research of everything I am seeing on internet. Point me in in a direction if there is a direction to point me in.
God Bless you and your family for caring and sharing with complete strangers.
I appreciate your honesty and your time. jess

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Jess-

    I am sorry to learn of your mother’s NSCLC diagnosis. I agree with your placing a priority on quality of life rather than quantity of life for a late stage NSCLC patient. I have worked with a number of late stage nsclc patients- several of whom where friends or family. My personal experience of aggressive late stage therapies such as chemo and radiation were…the results were less than the caregivers hoped.

    The challenge you and your mom will face are two. First of all, alternative therapies such as protocol are relatively slow acting. Secondly when considering non FDA approved therapies there is the lack of credible information.

    Do you and your mom have any interest in learning about and considering “integrative” therapies? The blog post linked below talks about nutritional supplements such as curcumin, resveritrol, grape seed extract and omega 3 fatty acids that ENHANCE conventional chemo while reducing toxicity.

    In my experience, taking an integrative approach may get you and your mom the best combination of both quality and quantity of life. Please read the post and studies linked below and let me know what you think or if you have any questions.

    The case for integrative therapy in stage 4 adenocarcinoma lung cancer

    Hang in there,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Janet says 6 years ago

Re: David Emerson’s wife
I too have stage 4 colon cancer – diagnosed in 2012 and given a two year prognosis. I understand your wife’s position and have gone through the conventional treatments…surgery (colon resection, liver resection twice and hysterectomy), chemo (folfuri, folfox, currently panitumumab). My original onc told me “absolutely not, you should not do anything but conventional treatment” That made me angry because I felt there had to be something more that I could do. I decided to research and pursued alternative therapies to use alongside the chemo. I met with a Naturopath who has trained in the treatment of cancer and we determined what would be best for me in terms of my cancer. I have been using the following since July of 2014: curcumin, vitamin C infusions, Cytocalm, B12, B6, and Melaton 5. I also changed my diet by cutting out red meat, processed foods and sugar. Recently I began mistletoe therapy. My current onc keeps telling me how wonderful I look and when I finally asked him how exactly I should be looking given the extent of my cancer, he said typical patients at my stage are jaundiced and their eyes are usually yellowish. Unfortunately he is not familiar with naturopathic treatments and believes it’s the panitumumab, which, by the way, is not working and my tumours continue to grow.
I don’t believe there will ever be a cure for cancer. I do however believe that you can alter your life to make the diagnosis/prognosis a better one. My thoughts and prayers are with you and your wife as you travel though your cancer journey. Stay strong and positive even when the going gets tough!!

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Janet-

    It looks as though you have managed your health challenges with grace and spirit. Thanks very much for this post. I’ll be sure to pass along your sentiments to my wife. Do you mind if I ask you a couple of questions?

    1) Do you continue to get intravenous vitamin C? If so, where do you live?

    2) what brand of curcumin do you take? Daily dose?

    3) did you have a hysterectomy because of mets from your colon cancer?

    If you choose not to answer, no problem. Thanks again for your words.

    David Emerson

    Reply
      Janet says 6 years ago

      First, I must apologize as it was Ron’s posting that I was referring to, so should have read “Ron’s wife”. Can I blame that on chemo brain??

      1) Do you continue to get intravenous vitamin C? If so, where do you live?
      – Yes I do continue to get IV-C and I live in Ontario, Canada

      2) what brand of curcumin do you take? Daily dose?
      – Thorne Meriva-SR, 4 capsules/day

      3) did you have a hysterectomy because of mets from your colon cancer?
      – Yes, the mass was 18cm (7 1/2″) when finally removed in June. Apparently it was the size of a golf ball when discovered in January and why it was not removed then is beyond me. I have since changed oncologists because of that incident.

      Are you familiar with juicing and, if so, how many times a day does one juice and are regular meals also eaten?

      Reply
        David Emerson says 6 years ago

        Hi Janet aka Ron’s Wife-

        While my own chemobrain has improved over the years I continue to blame lots on it. Yes, you can blame chemobrain.

        Thank you for providing the info above. As for your question “Are you familiar with juicing and, if so, how many times a day does one juice and are regular meals also eaten?”

        Yes, I am familiar with juicing. I will assume that you are asking about juicing as a serious therapy and not about juicing for general nutrition.

        When I have communicated with or read about cancer patients juicing as a therapy, there has never been any mention of eating regular foods. I have always assumed that people also eat solid foods. In particular, a multiple myeloma patient named Michael Gerin-Tosh juiced carrots daily for years. Lots of carrots… He wrote a book about it. Perhaps there is talk of solid foods.

        I hope this helps. Thanks.

        David

        Reply
ron says 6 years ago

I would like to know if my wife has a fighting chance she has stage 4 colon cancer and after surgery they said she has 21 spots in her liver she,s been on chemo for 1year and 9 months they had gave her 2 years to live.she still looks the same the only thing is she lost her hiar,and very stressed,sometimes I wonder if they missed diagnoused her.recently they started a stronger chemo,they said the cancer is not responding to the chemo she was getting,now I,m worried maybe they want to put her down faster,i am very frusterated,I even googled the doctors name and found that there is not too much good to say about her.

Reply
    ron says 6 years ago

    hey dave did you get my message

    Reply
      David Emerson says 6 years ago

      Hi Ron-

      Ditto just now- David

      Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Ron-

    I am sorry to read of your situation. Cancer, any cancer, is difficult. Stage 4 colorectal cancer is an especially difficult situation. Let me know if you have any questions.

    Hang in there- David Emerson

    Several issues.

    First of all, I always believe that all cancer patients “have a fighting chance” as you say. I was terminal back in 1997 and my cancer is considered incurable by oncology.

    Like me, you and your wife face long odds. By this I mean that conventional oncology has little to offer you. As you know, the five year survival rate of a stage 4 colon cancer patient is not great.

    The challenge you describe in your email, that your wife’s cancer is not “responding” to chemo not unusual in colon cancer. The key, in my experience, is identifying “integrative” therapies. I’ve listed some examples below. Curcumin is a nutritional supplement that has been shown to ENHANCE 5-FU while it reduces toxicity.

    The challenge that you will face with your wife’s onc. is that while these integrative therapies are evidence-based, they are not approved by the Food and Drug Admin. and therefore may not be prescribed by your onc.

    5-FU and curcumin-

    5-FU and green tea extract-
    5-FU and omega 3 fatty acids-
    Oxaliplatin and curcumin-

    https://www.google.com/search?q=5-Fluorouracil%2C+curcumin&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&channel=sb#channel=sb&q=neuropathy+curcumin+oxaliplatin&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official
    Oxaliplatin and omega 3s” target=”_blank”>Oxaliplatin and green tea extract-

    Reply
Lyne Goulet says 6 years ago

Hello David,
I am from the province of Québec, Canada, near Montréal. I’ll start by saying that, English not being my native tongue, there may be words or expressions that can seem a little strange, please forgive me in advance.
Last January, my husband was diagnosed with multiple myeloma, with total kidney disfunction (caused by the proliferation of cancer cells within). January 6th, he began a chemio treatment (along with daily dialysis), Velcade with dexamethasone. After 4 months of contiuous treatment by injection, the counts were down to 1700 (14000 at the beginning). The treatment stopped functionning suddenly, in May. It had taken 4 months to go down from 14000 to 1700, but only one to jump back to 9000. Jean (translated by John, in English) was then started on Revlimid, also with dex. First cycle, excellent news, looks like it’s working, counts are down to 500. I have to mention that plasmacytomas were regularly appearing, for which he had to undergo radiation therapy, 9 on a 5 month period. The one on his face disapeared totally, the other one, on his chest having reduced by more than half.
In the middle of June, I noticed that pain was coming back to his limbs, he was increasingly tired, and the mass on his chest seemed to increase in volume. On June 15th, he was back in the hospital, for a severe pneumonia. The second cycle coming to an end, he encountered a delay in treatment, which was resumed on June 18th. Back at home, the situation got worse (fatigue, loss of appetite). The appointment with the oncologist was scheduled for July 15Th. I asked that it was moved, I wanted to know, really, which, of the desease or the treatment, was to win the battle…
For a few months now, Jean was back to three dialysis treatments per week, on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. I asked to see the doctor on either a Wednesday or a Friday, days on which I work from home. The other option was to see her at the dialysis department on one of those days while Jean was being treated.
This last Friday, when I went to pick up Jean after his treatment, I learned that she came to see him alone, despite my instructions to be called. I wanted to be there… Jean would not tell me immediately what she told him. We went to have lunch and, back at home… well, my world fell apart. Revlimid also stopped working. Prognosis: 3 to 6 months, at best.
What I don’t quite understand is that dialysis is still on, three times a week. The doctor told Jean that there could be an experimental treatment in Montréal, but that he probably wouldn’t be eligible, not residing on the island. How can geography dispose of a human’s life?
I read about compound 11, also about virotherapy, those being tested in the States, but in Canada?
I also heard about cat’s claw, a remedy from Peru, which is starting to be quite reputed to eliminate cancer cells and regenerate the immune system. I have some at home, but I refreaned from using it up until now, having been told that since it can boost cell regeneration, it can boost the cancer cells as well. I don’t know what to do. If I do nothing, he dies, if I do the wrong thing, he dies…
Please help!

Reply
    David Emerson says 6 years ago

    Hi Lynn-

    It is clear from your communication that you and Jean have had a tough past seven months. I will try to address your questions below but please remember that I too went into partial remission, relapsed, etc. and was given only months to live. Back in 1997. So it is important to remember that myeloma is a tricky cancer that is not well understood.

    1) “What I don’t quite understand is that dialysis is still on, three times a week.” Keeping Jean’s kidney’s functioning is important. Keep up the dialysis treatments.
    2) “Prognosis: 3 to 6 months, at best.” As I mentioned above, this is conventional oncology’s thinking. Yes, Jean’s situation is serious. But please do not give up all hope.
    3) “The doctor told Jean that there could be an experimental treatment in Montréal, but that he probably wouldn’t be eligible, not residing on the island. How can geography dispose of a human’s life?” I have little experience with the Canadian health system.
    4) “I read about compound 11, also about virotherapy, those being tested in the States, but in Canada?
    I also heard about cat’s claw, a remedy from Peru, which is starting to be quite reputed to eliminate cancer cells and regenerate the immune system.”

    With regard to all experimental therapies at this point. Yes, there are a number of non-conventional therapies for MM. Without studies it is difficult to know what may be effective and what may be a scam aka fake. My experience is proof that there is more to MM treatment than what conventional oncology offers but you are on your own at this point.

    I will send you several non-conventional therapies that I take myself and have studies that support their efficacy against myeloma but you and Jean need to talk to each other to decide how to proceed.

    Please look for my email to your gmail account. Thanks

    David Emerson

    Reply
      Lyne Goulet says 6 years ago

      Thank you so much!
      I will do some research on what you wrote in your mess