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Integrative Lung Cancer Therapies

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They found that, in mice, treatment of follistatin in combination with platinum chemotherapy caused lung tumours to shrink and more animals to survive longer.

The most important statement in the study linked and excerpted below is the one that reads:

“Despite advances in immunotherapy for , most patients are still treated with chemotherapy based on a drug called cisplatin. However, less than a third of these patients will see benefits, and they often develop serious side effects including kidney damage…” 

I say this because everything I see and read about lung cancer (which is a lot based on my interest in all things cancer) is how immunotherapy is a game changer for lung cancer patients. And how immunotherapy can “help you live longer or tag lines to this effect. So which is it? Are lung cancer patients living longer with immunotherapies or, like the article says, are most lung cancer patients still treated with ineffective cisplatin?

If you have been diagnosed with lung cancer then you know the answer to this question. At least you to in your own situation. If you are undergoing cisplatin you can enhance the efficacy of this chemo with follistatin as well as other evidence-based, non-toxic therapies linked below.

I am both a long-term survivor of an incurable cancer called multiple myeloma and I am a cancer coach. As you have learned by now, depending on the stage at diagnosis, lung cancer is an aggressive cancer with miserable five year average survival averages.

That’s the bad news. The good news is that my cancer also has miserable five year averages. After I was told that “nothing more could be done for me” I pursued a host of evidence-based, non-toxic therapies. I reached complete remission from my cancer in early ’99 where I have remained since.

While I don’t believe that evidence-based, non-conventional lung cancer therapies are the answer for all lung cancer patients, I do believe that lung cancer patients must use nutritional, supplementation, and other non-conventional therapies before, during and after conventioal (FDA approved) therapies.

To learn more about evidence-based therapies for lung cancer, please watch the short video below:

Click here to follow along with the FREE Introduction Guide.

Click here for your FREE First Questions Guide.

Have you been diagnosed with lung cancer? What stage? What therapies are you considering? Please scroll down the page, post a question or comment and I will reply to you ASAP.

Thank you,

David Emerson

  • Canceer Survivor
  • Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


Turbo-charging chemotherapy for lung cancer

“A naturally occurring hormone could help make chemotherapy much more effective for many Australians with lung cancer, according to new findings from Sydney and Melbourne researchers.

And the hormone—known as follistatin—also appears to prevent , a serious side effect of chemotherapy…

Despite advances in immunotherapy for , most patients are still treated with chemotherapy based on a drug called cisplatin. However, less than a third of these patients will see benefits, and they often develop serious side effects including kidney damage.

In an effort to improve outcomes for , Professor Neil Watkins (Petre Chair in Cancer Biology, Garvan) and his team, including Dr. Kieren Marini (Hudson Institute), discovered that a protein called activin is a culprit in both chemotherapy resistance and chemotherapy-induced kidney damage.

“In chemotherapy-resistant tumours in mice, activin gets switched on in response to the damage caused by chemotherapy,” says Prof Watkins. “Cancer cells can then enlist activin to protect themselves. At the same time, when activin is switched on, it promotes kidney injury.”

Luckily for Prof Watkins (who began the research at Hudson Institute), the key to blocking activin happened to be across the hall…

Prof Watkins and his team put follistatin to the test. They found that, in mice, treatment of follistatin in combination with platinum chemotherapy caused lung tumours to shrink and more animals to survive longer. Remarkably, they found that kidney damage was also prevented.

“Discoveries like this one—a combination therapy that actually reduces damage while improving effectiveness of chemotherapy—are exceedingly rare in cancer research,” says Dr. Marini, who undertook the research as part of his Ph.D. at Hudson Institute…

Many of us have heard about the devastating side effects of chemotherapy in cancer patients. Our discovery has the potential to not only increase the effectiveness of platinum chemotherapy, but also give patients a better quality of life by preventing kidney damage,” says Dr. Marini.

Prof Watkins says the use of follistatin is likely to be a safe and effective approach to making chemotherapy more effective in lung cancer.

“Because follistatin is a hormone already found in the human body, there is much less potential for toxicity than with other drugs used to reduce chemoresistance….”

Curcumin sensitizes lung cancer cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis through superoxide anion-mediated Bcl-2 degradation.

“These findings indicate a novel pathway for curcumin regulation of Bcl-2, which could benefit the development of a cisplatin sensitizing agent.”

Resveratrol enhanced anticancer effects of cisplatin on non-small cell lung cancer cell lines by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and cell apoptosis

“In conclusion, results from the present study demonstrated for the first time that resveratrol inhibited H838 and H520 cell proliferation, and induced apoptosis in NSCLC cells through mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Resveratrol enhanced the proliferation inhibition and apoptosis inducing effects of cisplatin at least partially through this pathway.”

 

 

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