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Diagnosed with SMM, SPB, or MGUS?

Learn how you can stall the development of full-blown Multiple Myeloma with evidence-based nutritional and supplementation therapies.

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MGUS & SMM Reduce Risk of Progression to Multiple Myeloma

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“A recent pilot study found that curcumin, in certain patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), decreases the paraprotein load…”

A diagnosis of pre-myeloma, SBP, MGUS or SMM isn’t necessarily worrisome by itself. It is the possibility of a diagnosis of full-blown multiple myeloma (MM) that causes fear, anger and depression. At least my pre-myeloma diagnosis did for me back in early 1994.

What if you could undergo evidence-based, non-toxic therapies shown to reduce the risk of MM?

Even if you have been diagnosed with either MGUS or SMM you may not have the diagnostic information about your pre-multiple myeloma to be able to determine your risk of progression to MM.

And even if you are able to determine your risk of progression to MM, experience has shown me that evidence-based, non-toxic therapies can reduce your risk of progression to MM. Please understand, I did everything my oncologist told me to do and I still relapsed and reached end-stage MM. Back in the fall of 1997.

My experience is that conventional oncology just doesn’t understand pre-multiple myeloma- AKA

  • Single bone plasmycytoma (SBP)
  • Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS)
  • Smoldering Multiple Myeloma (SMM)

I’ve included the information in the studies linked and excerpted below in this post because it gives you a sense of where the understanding is about the risk of pre-mm becoming full mm in 2011.

MGUS at a glance- click the illustration below:MGUS png Mind Map

If you do not want to “watch and wait” to see if your MGUS/SMM progresses to Multiple Myeloma please watch the short video below:

Consider MGUS Therapies such as:

  1. non-toxic, cytotoxic/apoptotic supplements,
  2. foods that starve MGUS/SMM and MM
  3. evidence-based mind-body therapies,
  4. detoxification therapies,
  5. Non-conventional bone health therapies

David Emerson

  • MM Survivor
  • MM Cancer Coach
  • Director PeopleBeatingCancer

Recommended Reading:


Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM): novel biological insights and development of early treatment strategies

“Monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) are asymptomatic plasma cell dyscrasias, with a propensity to progress to symptomatic MM.

In recent years there have been improvements in risk stratification models (involving molecular markers) of both disorders, which have led to better understanding of the biology and probability of progression of MGUS and SMM.

In the context of numerous molecular events and heterogeneous risk of progression, developing individualized risk profiles for patients with MGUS and SMM represents an ongoing challenge that has to be addressed by prospective clinical monitoring and extensive correlative science.

In this review we discuss the current standard of care of patients with MGUS and SMM, the use of risk models, including flow cytometry and free-light chain analyses, for predicting risk of progression. Emerging evidence from molecular studies on MGUS and SMM, involving cytogenetics, gene-expression profiling, and microRNA as well as molecular imaging is described. Finally, future directions for improving individualized management of MGUS and SMM patients, as well as the potential for developing early treatment strategies designed to delay and prevent development of MM are discussed…

Predicting progression with current clinical risk models-

The Mayo Clinic risk stratification model for MGUS identifies 3 major risk factors for progression:

  • non-IgG isotype,
  • serum M-protein concentration > 1.5 g/dL, and
  • a skewed FLC-ratio (normal reference: 0.26-1.65).19

At 20 years of follow-up, absolute risk of progression for MGUS patients with 0, 1, 2, and 3 risk factors is

  • 5%,
  • 21%,
  • 37%, and
  • 58%, respectively (Table 2).19

For SMM, risk factors for progression include

  • bone marrow plasma cells > 10%,
  • serum M-protein concentration > 3 g/dL, and
  • a skewed FLC-ratio (normal reference: 0.125-8.0)

Cumulative risk of progression at 10 years for SMM patients with 1, 2, and 3 risk factors is:

  • 50%,
  • 65%, and
  • 84%, respectively (Table 2).20

Curcumin for the prevention of progression in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance: A word of caution

“A recent pilot study found that curcumin, in certain patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), decreases the paraprotein load and the urinary N-telopeptide of type 1 collagen bone turnover marker…

 

Leave a Comment:

32 comments
Judymorgan says a couple of days ago

David, I have just been diagnosed with multiple myeloma if could please let know what kind of diet or food I should be eating. I would appreciate your help. Judymorgan

Reply
    David Emerson says a day ago

    Hi Judy-

    I will send you the MM CC program nutrition guide via email.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Cheryl says a few days ago

I want to purchase the materials you mentioned. MGUS since 2014

Reply
    David Emerson says a few days ago

    Hi Cheryl-

    I emailed you the information directly.

    David Emerson

    Reply
MGUS Dx- Cure vs. Control? - PeopleBeatingCancer says 3 weeks ago

[…] MGUS & SMM Reduce Risk of Progression to Multiple Myeloma […]

Reply
Kathryn Guillaum says a few months ago

I hope you are still doing well. You are an inspiration to all you have advised, including me!

Reply
    David Emerson says a few months ago

    Thanks for the kind words Kathryn- yes, I am still doing well. I hope you are doing well too.

    David

    Reply
Marilyn says 6 months ago

All patients should have a vitamin B12 deficiency or Pernicious Anaemia excluded as this can be an underlying cause.

Reply
Marilyn says 6 months ago

All patients should have a vitamin B12 deficiency or Pernicious Anemia excluded as this can be an underlying cause.

Reply
BettyWright says 7 months ago

l have MG US for 14 years. My husband had. Myeloma after my diagnosis and sadly died 10 years ago

Reply
    David Emerson says 7 months ago

    Hi Betty-

    I am sorry for your loss as well as your MGUS diagnosis. You and your husband are a unique couple in the history of MM and pre-MM. If you write your story in an email I will publish it on PeopleBeatingCancer. A small tribute but a tribute…

    Your call.

    David Emerson

    Reply
Laura Jean Falla says 7 months ago

I’ve written you before – I was diagnosed with MGUS in 2013. Asked why this couldn’t be contolled and try to prevent MM. I was told nothing coukd be done until MM is diagnosed. Then the rough journey started!

Reply
    David Emerson says 7 months ago

    Hi Laura-

    I should credit you with starting me on my pre-MM journey! I too was told that nothing could be done for my SBP. Are you still MGUS? What are you doing to manage your health?

    thanks

    David Emerson

    Reply
MGUS- Evidence-Based, Non-Toxic Therapies - PeopleBeatingCancer says 8 months ago

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Ivy Brent says 4 years ago

Hi,

I have been diagnosed with MGUS. it was found suing a routine blood work during a yearly checkup. I have no symptoms. Was referred to a hematologist that I saw this week. Blood was taken for additional testing but I don’t have the results yet. This will be a baseline and I go back in 6 months for another test. If there are no changes then it will be yearly testing based on what the doctor said.

I want to understand as much about this as possible and to do whatever I can to stay healthy.

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Ivy-

    I am sorry to read of your MGUS diagnosis. However please understand that this is a diagnosis of an asymptomatic “blood disorder” and not cancer. Yes, there is the risk of increasing to full blown MM. My experience however is that pre-MM patients can and do live in this state for years.

    Getting a baseline reading is a good first step. Your hematologist should be able to give you your “m-spike” value. While there are other diagnostic readings for MGUS the m-spike is the main prognostic indicator.

    Because your diagnosis is not cancer conventional oncology will not prescribe medications. Your oncologist will probably tell you to “watch and wait.” Which is fine, at this stage. However there are a number of evidence-based non-toxic therapies that studies has shown can reduce your risk of progressing to frank MM. Margaret of Margaret’s Corner has lived in a pre-MM stage for over 18 years- you can search for her blog.

    Re your statement that you want to do “whatever I can to stay healthy,” the pre-MM program is designed for MGUS patients to eat, supplement and practice lifestyle therapies to do just this.

    Let me know if you have any questions. Good luck,

    David Emerson

    Reply
Louis Bajkai says 4 years ago

Free Kappa Lt Chains,s 38.14
Your comments, please.
Louis

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Louis-

    The normal range for Kappa FLC’s is 3.30-19.40 (mg/L). So a level of 38.14 is high. Do you know other blood levels such as your M-spike? Or albumin blood levels? Have you been diagnosed with multiple myeloma? Are you experiencing any symptoms such as

    1) bone pain or damage

    2) anemia (fatigue)

    3) kidney damage

    If so, not to worry. There is a long and growing list of conventional (FDA approved) therapies and a long and growing list of evidence-based, non-toxic, non-conventional therapies. You have many choices to manage your MM.

    Let me know. Hang in there,

    David Emerson
    MM Survivor
    MM Cancer Coach
    Director PeopleBeatingCancer

    Reply
MGUS Blood Disorder says 4 years ago

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anthony sanders says 4 years ago

Can you give more info on the MGUS program? Is it on this website? If so where?

Reply
    David Emerson says 4 years ago

    Hi Anthony-

    The webinar of the MGUS CC Program is in production. I will email you the Introduction that we give to viewers to follow along.

    Have you been diagnosed with MGUS? If so, do you know your m-spike or kappa or lambda levels? Are you experiencing any side effects? I will email the Introduction to your gmail account now.

    Thanks

    David Emerson

    Reply
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